Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 16:1

Then Job answered,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Persecution;   Thompson Chain Reference - Job;  
Dictionaries:
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;  

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

JOB 16

JOB'S FIFTH DISCOURSE:

JOB'S REPLY TO ELIPHAZ AND THE OTHER "COMFORTERS"

Eliphaz had just finished blasting Job with his allegations that, "If Job had been as good as he claimed to be, he would never have had all those troubles. Since the troubles came, they meant, of course, that Job was wicked; and now that he would not even admit it, he was, in addition to everything else, a hardened hypocrite."[1] It is difficult to imagine a more unjust, unfeeling or more evil personal assault upon a suffering human brother than was this devil-inspired diatribe by Eliphaz against Job.

"There was absolutely nothing new in the speech that Eliphaz had just concluded, if we except the bitterness and invective in it."[2] "Eliphaz was merely repeating what he and the others had already said; but, instead of being silent as Job had begged them to be (Job 13:5),"[3] they were merely adding to his troubles by forcing their words upon him.

JOB'S REJECTION OF THEIR SO-CALLED "COMFORTING"

Job 16:1-5

"Then Job answered and said,

I have heard many such things:

Miserable comforters are ye all.

Shall vain words have an end?

Or what provoketh thee that thou answerest?

I also could speak as ye do;

If your soul were in my soul's stead,

I could join words together against you,

And shake my head at you,

But I would strengthen you with my mouth,

And the solace of my lips would assuage your grief."

"Miserable comforters are ye all" (Job 16:2). Job in these words rejected the speeches of his friends as worthless to him.

"Shall vain words have an end" (Job 16:3)? This was Job's way of asking if they were ever going to shut up!

"I could speak as ye do ... but I would strengthen you ... assuage your grief" (Job 16:4-5). Job promised here, that if their roles should be reversed, he would comfort instead of torment them, as they were doing him.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 16:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-16.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then Job answered and said. As soon as Eliphaz had done speaking, Job stood up, and made the following reply.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 16:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-16.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Job 16:1-22. Job‘s reply.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 16:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-16.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 16:1 Then Job answered and said,

Ver. 1. Then Job answered and said] Although he had little or nothing to answer unto but what he had answered before, yet that he might not say nothing, he replieth to Eliphaz’s painted speech, and giveth him to know, that prudentibus viris non placent phalerata sed fortia (as Bishop Jewel was wont to say), that is, that wise men look for matter, and not for words only, from those that accost them.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 16:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-16.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

CHAP. XVI.

Job expostulates with his friends on their unkind treatment; and declares, that if they were in the like distress he would behave to them in a different manner. He sets forth the greatness of his sufferings, but still maintains his integrity.

Before Christ 1645.

Job 16:1. Then Job answered and said Job, above measure grieved that his friends should treat him in this cruel manner, expostulates very tenderly with them on the subject. He tells them, that he should, in the like circumstances, have behaved to them in a very different way: Job 16:2-6; That he, as well as every one about him, was in the utmost astonishment to find a man whom he imagined to be his friend accuse him falsely, and give him worse treatment than even his greatest enemies would have done. But that he plainly saw that God was pleased to add this to the rest of his calamities; that he should not only be deprived of the comfort and assistance which he might have expected from his friends, but that he should be used by them in the most relentless way: Job 16:7-14 That he had voluntarily taken upon him all the marks of humility used by the guilty, though he was really innocent of their charges; that God above knew his innocence, though his friends so slanderously traduced him: Job 16:15-22 that he was sensible he was nigh his dissolution: chap. Job 17:1-3 that he made no doubt, that whenever the cause came to a decision the event would prove favourable to him. In the mean time, they would do well to consider what effect this their treatment of him must have on mankind; and how great a discouragement it must be to the lovers of virtue and holiness, to see a man whose character was yet unstained, on bare suspicion, dealt with so cruelly by persons pretending to virtue and goodness: Job 16:4-9. Would they but give themselves time to reflect, they must see that he could have no motive to hypocrisy, since all his schemes and hopes, with regard to life, were at an end; and, as he expected nothing but death, with what view could he play the hypocrite? Job 16:10 to the end. Heath.

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 16:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-16.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

Job in this chapter is again entering upon his defense. He complains of the unkindness of his friends; pleads for more tenderness from them; shows the pitifulness of his case: and again, as to the charge of hypocrisy, contends that he is not guilty.

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Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 16:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-16.html. 1828.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

JOB’S FOURTH REPLY. Chaps. 16, 17.

1.Job answered and said — He replies to their heartless speeches, that there is a vast difference between the condition of a sufferer and that of his upbraiders. Their windy words have left his grief unassuaged. The conflict rages sore around him. His friends are not his sole antagonists: his startled soul sees on all sides a glaring throng of fiendish foes, into whose power God has cast him headlong. In every form of assault known to warfare the Divine Being has attacked him, until, (so he imagines,) crushed and wounded, he lies weltering in his own blood. The darkest hour, however, is one of hope. The blood of the innocent has power with God. Job’s faith, like that of Abel, is glorified in the juncture of extreme distress. It rises to the certainty that the God who is in the heights sees and feels his woes, and, conscious of this divine sympathy, he ventures to supplicate God himself, to plead with God in his behalf (ch. 17). With the grave beneath his feet, he prays for a mediator. He makes the amazing appeal to God to be his sponsor or bondsman with God. He has faith to believe that his sufferings shall not injure the cause of virtue. “A bitter feeling at the behaviour of his friends extends itself like a red thread throughout the entire discourse.” — Hitzig. See Job 16:10; Job 16:20; Job 17:2; Job 17:4; Job 17:10; Job 17:12.

 

 

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 16:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-16.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 16:1. Then Job answered and said — “Job, above measure grieved that his friends should treat him in this cruel manner, expostulates very tenderly with them on the subject. He tells them he should, in the like circumstances, have behaved to them in a very different way, Job 16:2. That he, as well as every one about him, was in the utmost astonishment, to find a man, whom he imagined his friend, accuse him falsely, and give him worse treatment than even his greatest enemies would have done. But that he plainly saw God was pleased to add this to the rest of his calamities; that he should not only be deprived of the comfort and assistance he might have expected from his friends, but that he should be used by them in a most relentless way, Job 16:7-14. That he had voluntarily taken on him all the marks of humility used by the guilty, though he was really innocent; that God above knew his innocence, though his friends so slanderously traduced him, Job 16:15-22. That he was sensible he was nigh his dissolution, otherwise he could return their own with interest, Job 17:1-3. That he made no doubt, whenever the cause came to a decision, the event would prove favourable to him. In the mean time, they would do well to consider what effect this their treatment of him must have on all mankind, and how great a discouragement it must be to the lovers of virtue, to see a man, whose character was yet unstained, on bare suspicion, dealt with so cruelly by persons pretending to virtue and goodness, Job 16:4-9. Would they but give themselves time to reflect, they must see that he could have no motive to hypocrisy; since all his schemes and hopes, with regard to life, were at an end, and, as he expected nothing but death, with what view could he play the hypocrite?” Job 16:10, to the end. — Heath.

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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 16:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-16.html. 1857.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

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Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 16:1". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-16.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

answered = replied. See note on Job 4:1.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 16:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-16.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then Job answered and said,

No JFB commentary on this verse.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 16:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-16.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XVI.

(1) Then Job answered.—Job, in replying, ceases to continue the argument, which he finds useless; but, after complaining of the way his friends have conducted it, and contrasting the way in which they have treated him with that in which he would treat them were they in his case, he proceeds again to enlarge upon his condition, and makes a touching appeal to Heaven, which prepares us for the more complete confession in Job 19. He ends by declaring that his case is desperate.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 16:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-16.html. 1905.