Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 27:2

"As God lives, who has taken away my right, And the Almighty, who has embittered my soul,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;  
Dictionaries:
Holman Bible Dictionary - Guilt;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Job;   Providence;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Job, Book of;   Right;   Take;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Who hath taken away my judgment - Who has turned aside my cause, and has not permitted it to come to a hearing, where I might have justice done to me, but has abandoned me to the harsh and uncharitable judgment of my enemies? There appears to be a great want of reverence in these words of Job; he speaks with a degree of irritation, if not bitterness, which cannot be justified. No man should speak thus of his Maker.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-27.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

As God liveth - A form of solemn adjuration, or an oath by the living God. “As certainly as God lives.” It is the form by which God himself often swears; see Ezekiel 14:16; Ezekiel 33:11, and is often employed by others; 1 Samuel 20:3; 1 Samuel 25:26.

Who hath taken away my judgment - Who hath rejected my cause, or who has refused me justice; that is, who has treated me as though I was guilty, and withholds from me relief. The language is forensic, and the idea is, that he would make his solemn appeal to him, even though he had rejected his cause. Perhaps there is implied here more than the solemnity of an ordinary oath. A man might be supposed to be willing to make his appeal to one who had shown himself friendly or favorable to him, but he would manifest more reluctance to making his appeal in an important case to a judge who had decided against him, especially if that decision was regarded as severe, and if that judge had refused to hear what he had to say in self-defense. But Job here says, that such was his confidence in his own sincerity and truth, that he could make his appeal to God, even though he knew that he had hitherto gone against him, and treated him as if he were guilty.

Who hath vexed my soul - Margin, as in Hebrew “made my soul bitter.” That is, who has greatly afflicted me; compare 2 Kings 4:27, margin, and Rth 1:20 .

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-27.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 27:2

The Almighty hath vexed my soul.

A vexed soul comforted

The word “who” was put into this verse by the translators, but it is not wanted; it is better as I have read it to you, “The Almighty hath vexed my soul.” The marginal reading is perhaps a more exact translation of the original: “The Almighty hath embittered my soul.” From this we learn that a good man may have his soul vexed; he may not be able to preserve the serenity of his mind. There is a needs be, sometimes, that we should be “in heaviness through manifold temptations.” Even to rivers there are rapids and cataracts, and so, methinks, in the most smoothly flowing life, there surely must be breaks of distraction and of distress. At any rate, it was so with Job. It is also clear, from our text, that a good man may trace the vexation of his soul distinctly to God. It was not merely that Job’s former troubles had come from God, for he had borne up under them; when all he had was gone, he had still blessed the name of the Lord with holy serenity. But God had permitted these three eminent and distinguished men, mighty in speech, to come about him, to rub salt into his wounds, and so to increase his agony. Advancing a step further, we notice that, in all this, Job did not rebel against God, or speak a word against Him. He swore by that very God who had vexed his soul. See how it stands here: “As God liveth, who hath taken away my judgment, and the Almighty, who hath vexed my soul.” He stood fast to it that this God was the true God, he called Him good, he believed Him to be almighty; it never occurred to Job to bring a railing accusation against God, or to start aside from his allegiance to Him. Now go another step, and notice that this embittering of Job’s soul was intended for his good. The patriarch was to have his wealth doubled, and he therefore needed double grace that he might be able to bear the burden. When that end was accomplished, all the bitterness was turned into sweetness.

I. First, I shall speak upon a personal fact. Many a person has to say, “The Almighty hath embittered my soul.”

1. This happened to you, perhaps, through a series of very remarkable troubles.

2. It may be, however, that you have not had a succession of troubles, but you have had one trial constantly gnawing at your heart.

3. I hope that it has become saddened through a sense of sin.

4. It may be that this is not exactly your case, but you are restless and weary.

5. Beside all this, there is an undefined dread upon you. “The Almighty hath embittered my soul.”

II. From this personal fact of which I have spoken I want to draw an instructive argument, which has two edges.

1. If the Almighty--note that word “Almighty”--has vexed your soul as much as He has, how much more is He able to vex it! Now turn the argument the other way.

2. If it be the Almighty who has troubled us, surely He can also comfort us. He that is strong to sink is also strong to save.

III. Here is a healthful inquiry for everyone whose soul has been vexed by God.

1. The inquiry is, first, is not God just in vexing my soul? Listen. Some of you have long vexed Him; you have grieved His Holy Spirit for years. Well, if you vex God’s people, you must not be surprised if He vexes you.

2. Another point of inquiry is this: What can be God’s design in vexing your soul? Surely He has a kind design in it all. God is never anything but good. Rest assured that He takes no delight in your miseries. You forgot Him when everything went merry as a marriage peal. It may be, too, that He is sending this trial to let you know that He thinks of you.

3. May it not be also for another reason--that He may wean you entirely from the world? He is making you loathe it. I think I hear someone say, “As the Almighty hath vexed my soul, what had I better do?” Do? Go home, and shut to your door, and have an hour alone with yourself and God. That hour alone with God may be the crisis of your whole life; do try it! “And when I am alone with God, what had I better do?” Well, first, tell Him all your grief. Then tell Him all your sin. Hide nothing from Him; lay it all, naked and bare, before Him. Then ask Him to blot it all out, once for all, for Jesus Christ’s sake. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 27:2". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-27.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

As God liveth,.... Which is an oath, as Jarchi observes, and is a form of one frequently used, see 2 Samuel 2:27; and is used by God himself, who, because he can swear by no greater, swears by himself, and by his life, which ever continues, as in Ezekiel 18:3; and many other places; and so the Angel of the Lord, even the uncreated Angel, Daniel 12:7; and so should men, when they swear at all, it should be in this manner, see Jeremiah 4:2; though this ought not to be but in cases of moment and importance, for the confirmation of the truth, and to put an end to strife, when it cannot be done any other way than by an appeal to God; as was the present case with Job, it being about hypocrisy, and want of integrity his friends charged him with; and such a case can only be determined truly and fully by God, who is here described as the living God, by whom men swear, in opposition to the idols of the Gentiles, which are of gold, silver, wood, and stone, and without life and breath, or to their deified heroes, who were dead men; but the true God is the living God, has life in and of himself, and is the fountain of life to others, the author and giver of life, natural, spiritual, and eternal, and who himself lives for ever and ever; and as such is the object of faith and confidence, of fear and reverence, of love and affection; all which swearing by him supposes and implies; it is a saying of R. Joshuah, as Jarchi on the place relates it,

"that Job from love served God, for no man swears by the life of a king but who loves the king;'

the object swore by is further described,

who hath taken away my judgment; not the judgment of his mind, or his sense of judging things, which remained with him quick and strong, notwithstanding his afflictions; nor correction with judgment, which continued with him; but, as the Targum paraphrases it,

"he hath taken away the rule of my judgment;'

that is, among men, his substance, wealth, and riches, his former affluence and prosperity, which while he enjoyed, he was reckoned a good man; but now all this being taken away by the hand of God as it was, he was censured as a wicked man, and even by his friends; or rather it is a complaint, that God had neglected the judgment of him, like that of the church in Isaiah 40:27; that he did not stir up himself to his judgment, even to his cause; did not vindicate him, though he appealed to him; did not admit him to his judgment seat, nor give his cause a hearing, and decide it, though he had most earnestly desired it; nor did he let him know the reason of his thus dealing and contending with him; yea, he afflicted him severely, though righteous and innocent, in which Job obliquely reflects upon the dealings of God with him; though he does not charge him with injustice, or break out into blasphemy of him; yet this seems to be one of those speeches which God disapproved of, and is taken notice of by Elihu with a censure, Job 34:5;

and the Almighty, who hath vexed my soul; with whom nothing is impossible, and who could easily have relieved him from his distresses; and who was "Shaddai", the all-sufficient Being, who could have supplied him with all things temporal and spiritual he wanted; yet instead of this "vexed his soul" with adversity, with afflictions very grievous to him, his hand touching and pressing him sore: or, "hath made my soul bitter"F2המר נפשי "affecit amaritudine animam meam", Pagninus, Montanus, Mercerus, Michaelis; so Sept. ; dealt bitterly with him, as the Almighty did with Naomi, 1:20. Afflictions are bitter things, they are like the waters of Marah, they are wormwood and gall, they cause bitter distress and sorrow, and make a man go and speak in the bitterness of his soul; and these are of God, to whom job ascribes his, and not to chance and fortune; they were bitter things God appointed for him and wrote against him.

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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-27.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

[As] God liveth, [who] hath taken away my a judgment; and the Almighty, [who] hath vexed my soul;

(a) He has so sore afflicted me that men cannot judge my uprightness; for they judge only by outward signs.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-27.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

(1 Samuel 20:3).

taken away  …  judgment — words unconsciously foreshadowing Jesus Christ (Isaiah 53:8; Acts 8:33). God will not give Job his right, by declaring his innocence.

vexedHebrew, “made bitter” ( 1:20).

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-27.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

As God liveth, who hath taken away my judgment; and the Almighty, who hath vexed my soul;

Who — Though he knows my integrity, yet doth not plead my cause against my friends.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-27.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

vexed

Heb. made my soul bitter.

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Job 27:2". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/job-27.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 27:2 [As] God liveth, [who] hath taken away my judgment; and the Almighty, [who] hath vexed my soul;

Ver. 2. As God liveth, who hath taken away my judgment] Job well knew the nature and end of an oath, which is to put an end to all strife and controversy among men, Hebrews 6:16. For more authority’s sake, therefore, to his ensuing discourse, by taking God as witness in a matter of so great moment, and that his friends might the better believe him, he doubteth not to begin his speech with a private oath (for a public is that which is taken before a magistrate, who upon just cause may exact it), which, so it be sparingly and warily used, is not unlawful, as appeareth by the example of Jacob and Laban, Boaz and Ruth, Jonathan and David, sc. to help the truth in necessity, and when the other party will not otherwise be satisfied. But what meaneth Job to say that the God, whom he so solemnly taketh to witness, had taken away his judgment? Can the righteous Judge do otherwise than right? Or doth not the plaintiff know that he is punished less than his iniquities deserved? Ezra 9:13. For answer Job was at present under a sore temptation, and being pressed out of measure above strength, he spake unadvisedly with his lips, and is afterwards barely told of it by Elihu, Job 34:5. The best faith, if long tried, may flag and hang the wing. Moses at Meribah, David at Gath, Elijah under the juniper, sufficiently show that every new man is two men; that the flesh soon lusteth against the spirit, and that the best may have their outbursts; yet so as that the seed of grace still abideth in them, and some way shows itself; Job here, for instance. He complaineth of God’s severity, but stormeth not against him. He blustereth, but he blasphemeth not. He holdeth himself hardly dealt with by God; and yet while he so solemnly sweareth by him, he thereby acknowledgeth him a witness of his conscience, a patron of truth, a lover of right, an avenger of perjury, and, lastly, the author and arbiter of his life, which he resolveth rather to let go than his innocence: he can do nothing against the truth, but for the truth, 2 Corinthians 13:8.

And the Almighty, who hath vexed my soul] Heb. Hath embittered. Job should have remembered that bitter portions bring sweet health, and that το πικρον μικρον, the bitterness would soon be past; but he remembered only at present the affliction and the misery, the wormwood and the gall, Lamentations 3:19. "Now no affliction (but especially soul affliction) for the present seemeth joyous, but grievous; nevertheless afterward it yieldeth the peaceable fruit of righteousness unto them which are exercised thereby," Hebrews 12:11. But patient Job wanted patience to wait for that. Adeo nihil est in nobis magni, quod non queat minui; such failings are found in the very best.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 27:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-27.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 27:2. Who hath taken away my judgment Who hath afflicted me so severely, without any notorious blame on my part. Schultens.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 27:2". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-27.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He confirms the truth and sincerity of his expressions by an oath, because he found them very hard to believe all his professions.

My judgment, or my right, or my cause, i.e. who, though he knows my integrity and piety towards him, yet doth not plead my cause against my friends, nor will admit me to plead my cause with him before them, as I have so oft and earnestly desired, nor doth deal with me according to those terms of grace and mercy wherewith he treateth other men and saints; but useth me with great rigour, and by his sovereign power punisheth me sorely, without discovering to me what singular cause I have given him to do so.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 27:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-27.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

Section first — JOB’S RENEWED ASSEVERATION OF HIS INNOCENCE IS CONFIRMED UNDER THE SANCTIONS OF AN OATH, Job 27:2-10. Hengstenberg and Hitzig divide the section into two strophes.

a. The oath of his innocence he takes with the full consciousness of its gravity, and with a determination to maintain it against all gainsayers, Job 27:2-6.

2.As God liveth — Literally, living is God, that is, “by the living God,” an Arabic and Hebrew form of oath. Raschi cites from Rabbi Joshua, that Job must have served God from love, because no one swears by the life of a king unless he loves the king. Compare Psalms 63:11, and Isaiah 48:1.

My judgment, etc. — My right. God has not only rejected his cause, but embittered his soul. This cry of wrong demonstrates that Job is still far from fitted to undo the twisted knot of his sufferings and rise erect in true manhood, renewed through sorrow; while it most admirably paves the way for Elihu.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-27.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Judgment. Chaldean, "my rule of judging." Septuagint, "Live the Lord, who hath judged me thus." Symmachus, "hath despised my judgment." The expression seems very harsh, and may be one of those which God blames, chap. xl. 3. (Estius) (Calmet) --- Yet we shall examine that point later, chap. xlii. (Haydock) --- He may only mean that he is so well convinced of his innocence, that he calls God to witness it, (Calmet) and adores his ways, (Haydock) in not permitting him to appear before his tribunal, (Calmet) to justify himself; (Menochius) so the he is abandoned to the rash judgments of others, chap. xxxiv. 5. Isaias (xl. 27.) and Sophonias (iii. 15.) speak in similar terms. (Calmet) --- God deferred passing sentence, for Job's greater trial. (Worthington)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-27.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"As God lives": This is an oath, "thus asserting that what he was about to affirm was as certain as God"s existence" (Zuck p. 119). Yet Job must swear by a God that he claims that taken away his right, that is, has refused to hear his case, and thus has embittered his soul (7:11; 9:18; 10:1). "Despite his complaints about the justice of God, he still has the confidence to swear by Him. Backing up his oath, Job risks everything he has, is, or will be on the character of God-my justice, my soul, my breath, my lips, my tongue, my integrity, my righteousness, and my heart (2-6)" (McKenna p. 190). 27:2-3 As long as Job has life he will speak the truth, which means maintaining his innocence and disagreeing with the views of his friends. They had advised him to repent, Job believes that such an action would be dishonest and hypocritical (27:4 ). He will maintain his integrity until the end of his days, he also denies any awareness of sins such as his consolers had charged to him (22:6-9). His conscience remained clear!

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-27.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

GOD. Heb El. App-4.

THE ALMIGHTY. Hebrew Shaddai. App-4.

my soul = me. Hebrew. nephesh. App-13.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-27.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

As God liveth, who hath taken away my judgment; and the Almighty, who hath vexed my soul;

As God liveth - (1 Samuel 20:3). As God liveth - (1 Samuel 20:3).

Taken away ... judgment - words unconsciously foreshadowing Jesus Christ (Isaiah 53:8; Acts 8:33). God will not give Job his right by declaring his innocence.

Vexed - Hebrew, made bitter (Ruth 1:20).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-27.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) As God liveth, who hath taken away my judgment.—Job’s faith leads him to see that, though there may be no explanation for his sufferings, yet they are laid upon him by God for purposes of His own, which are veiled from him.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-27.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

As God liveth, who hath taken away my judgment; and the Almighty, who hath vexed my soul;
God liveth
Numbers 14:21; Ruth 3:13; 1 Samuel 14:39,45; 20:21; 25:26,34; 2 Samuel 2:27; 1 Kings 17:1; 18:15; Jeremiah 4:2; 5:2; 12:16; Ezekiel 33:11
taken
10:3; 34:5; Isaiah 40:27
vexed my soul
Heb. made my soul bitter.
Ruth 1:20,21; 2 Kings 4:27
Reciprocal: Judges 18:25 - angry;  Job 19:2 - vex;  Job 23:16 - Almighty;  Job 32:2 - because;  Job 35:2 - My;  Job 40:2 - he that reproveth;  Job 40:8 - wilt thou condemn;  Daniel 12:7 - liveth;  Acts 8:33 - judgment

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 27:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-27.html.