Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 27:23

"Men will clap their hands at him And will hiss him from his place.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Death;   Oppression;   Rich, the;   Wicked (People);   Thompson Chain Reference - Dishonour;   Honour-Dishonour;   Wicked, the;  
Dictionaries:
Easton Bible Dictionary - Hiss;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Gestures;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Job;   Providence;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Hiss;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Clap;   Gesture;   Hand;   Hiss;   Job, Book of;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Men shall clap their hands at him - These two verses refer to the storm, which is to sweep away the ungodly; therefore the word God, in Job 27:22, and men in this verse, should be omitted.

    Job 27:22; : "For it shall fall upon him, and not spare: flying from its power he shall continue to fly.

    Job 27:23. It shall clap its hands against him, and hiss, וישרק veyishrok, shriek, him out of his place."

Here the storm is personified and the wicked actor is hissed and driven by it from off the stage. It seems it was an ancient method to clap the hands against and hiss a man from any public office, who had acted improperly in it. The populace, in European countries, express their disapprobation of public characters who have not pleased them in the same manner to the present day, by hisses, groans, and the like.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 27:23". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-27.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Men shall clap their hands at him - That is, they shall combine to drive him out of the world, and rejoice when he is gone. The same sentiment was also expressed by Bildad, Job 18:18:

“He shall be driven fromm light into darkness,

And chased out of the world.”

There can be no doubt, I think, that Job alludes to that sentiment, and that his object in quoting it is to show its incorrectness. He does not indeed go into a formal reply to it in the following chapters, but he seems to consider that he had already replied to it by the statements which he had made, and which showed the incorrectness of the views which his friends had taken. He had demonstrated in the previous chapters that their main position was incorrect, and he asks (in Job 27:12 of this chapter), how it was possible that they could hold such sentiments as these, in the midst of all the facts which surrounded them? The whole current of events was against their opinion, and in the close of this chapter he enumerates the sentiments which they had advanced, which he regarded as so strange, and which he felt that he had now shown to be erroneous. In deed, they seem to have regarded themselves as confuted, for they were silent. Job had attacked and overthrown their main position, that people were treated according to their character in this life, and that consequently extraordinary sufferings were proof of extraordinary guilt, and, that being overthrown, they had nothing more to say. Having silenced them, and shown the error of the opinions which he has here enumerated, be proceeds in the following chapters to state his own views on important topics connected with the providence of God, mainly designed to show that we are not to expect fully to comprehend the reason of his dispensations.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 27:23". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-27.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 27:23

Men shall clap their hands at him; and shall hiss him out of his place.

Hissed off the stage

This allusion seems to be dramatic. The Bible more than once makes such allusions. Paul says, “We are made a theatre or spectacle to angels and to men.” It is evident from the text that some of the habits of theatre goers were known in Job time, because he describes an actor hissed off the stage. The impersonator comes on the boards and, either through lack of study of the part he is to take or inaptness or other incapacity, the audience is offended, and expresses its disapprobation and disgust by hissing. “Men shall clap their hands at him, and shall hiss him out of his place.” My text suggests that each one of us is put on the stage of this world to take some part. What hardship and suffering and discipline great actors have undergone year after year that they might be perfected in their parts, you have often read. But we, put on the stage of this life to represent charity and faith and humility and helpfulness--what little preparation we have made, although we have three galleries of spectators, earth, and heaven, and hell! Have we not been more attentive to the part taken by others than to the part taken by ourselves, and, while we needed to be looking at home and concentring on our own duty, we have been criticising the other performers, and saying “that was too high,” or “too low,” or “too feeble,” or “too extravagant,” or “too tame,” or “too demonstrative,” while we ourselves were making a dead failure and preparing to be ignominiously hissed off the stage. Each one is assigned a place; no supernumeraries hanging around the drama of life to take this or that or the other part, as he may be called upon. No one can take our place. We can take no other place. Neither can we put off our character; no change of apparel can make us anyone else than that which we eternally are.

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 27:23". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-27.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Men shall clap their hands at him,.... In a way of joy and triumph, scorn and derision, see Lamentations 2:15; either at the time of his death, being glad they are rid of him, Psalm 52:5; or rather hereafter, to all eternity, while the wrath and vengeance of God is pouring on him; and this will be done by all righteous men evermore; not pleasing themselves with the shocking scene, nor indulging any evil passion in them, from which they will be entirely free; but rejoicing in the glory of divine justice, which will be displayed in the everlasting destruction of wicked men, see Revelation 18:20; and this need not be restrained to good men only, but ascribed to angels also; for it may be rendered impersonally, "hands shall be clapped at him"; or joy be expressed on this occasion by all in heaven, angels and saints, who will all approve and applaud the divine procedure against wicked men as right and just; yea, this may express the glorying of divine justice, and its triumph in the condemnation and destruction of sinners;

and shall hiss him out of his place; from the bar and tribunal of God, where he stood and was condemned; and, as he goes to everlasting punishment, expressing abhorrence and detestation of him and his crimes, and as pleased with the righteous judgment of God upon him. Now this is the wicked man's portion, and the heritage he shall have of God at and after death, though he has been in flourishing circumstances in life; all which Job observes, to show that he was no friend nor favourer of wicked men, nor thought well of them and their ways, though he observed the prosperity they are attended with in their present state; and as for himself, he was not, and would not, be such a wicked man, and an hypocrite, on any account whatever, since he was sure he must then be miserable hereafter, to all intents and purposes.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 27:23". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-27.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

hands — for joy at his downfall (Lamentations 2:15; Nahum 3:19).

hiss — deride (Jeremiah 25:9). Job alludes to Bildad‘s words (Job 18:18).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 27:23". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-27.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Men shall clap their hands at him, and shall hiss him out of his place.

Clap — In token of their joy at the removal of such a publick pest, by way of astonishment: and in contempt and scorn, all which this gesture signifies in scripture use.

His — In token of detestation and derision.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 27:23". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-27.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 27:23 [Men] shall clap their hands at him, and shall hiss him out of his place.

Ver 23. Men shall clap their hands at him, &c.] Heb. He shall clap, &c. Every he shall, or God shall, as some read it. God shall kick him off this stage of the world, and then men shall clap and hiss at him in sign of detestation; as they did once at Sejanus, Phocas, Richard III, whose miseries were a part of other men’s happiness, who looked upon them as wolves and public pests.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 27:23". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-27.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

READER! we have gone over many chapters now of the patriarch Job's controversy, and heard much on both sides. What conclusions have we drawn from all that hath been said? Certainly the reasoning of Job is unanswerable, and as he expressed it in one of the chapters, It is meet to be said unto GOD I have borne chastisement. I will not offend anymore. That which I see not teach thou me. Job 34:31-32. Sin and sorrow are twins and are born together. So that they are inseparable. It ought to be no wonder, that a sinful creature is a sorrowful creature. For man that is born in sin, is born to trouble as the sparks fly upward. And if the best of men were to converse more with themselves, and compare self with the law of an holy GOD this would lower all presumptuous reasonings in the seasons of our afflictions. Reader! let us from Job's sorrows make these improvements. Methinks while I read this man's trials, I would learn to consider more GOD'S holiness and my unworthiness; and while I keep in view the divine law and human transgression; as sin then appears what it really is, exceeding sinful, the burthen of it will be heavy, and the affliction grow lighter; till at length the confession of the church in Babylon, or what is to the same amount, the prophet for the church will be found to suit every case: Wherefore should a living man complain; a man for the punishment of his sins? In an ocean of trouble there is not a drop of injustice. Thou art righteous, O Lord, in all that is come upon us (saith the church) thou punisheth us less than our iniquities deserve. Everything short of hell is mercy.

Precious JESUS! oh how sweet is it to fly to thee, who hast both borne our sins and carried our sorrow's. Thou drankest the cup of trembling dear LORD and hast wrung it all out. One view of thine agony in the garden and on the cross is enough, when GOD the HOLY GHOST opens the eye to see, to silence every complaint and to dry up every tear, which falls for our sufferings, and to cause them to fall in showers, in the contemplation of thine. Blessed LAMB of GOD! I would say, as I view by faith thine agonies, Why LORD didst thou die for me? and whence this bloody sweat? Was it for me? Oh for grace to look, and love, and make the apostle's conclusion mine: If one died for all, then were all dead. And that he died for all, that henceforth they that live should not live to themselves, but to him that died for them, and rose again. Oh LORD! let my life be wholly thine. May I glorify thee in my body, and in my spirit, forever.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 27:23". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-27.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Men, who shall see and observe these things,

shall clap their hands; partly, in token of their joy at the removal of such a public pest and tyrant; and partly, by way of astonishment; and partly, in contempt, and scorn, or derision; all which this gesture signifies in Scripture use; of which see Lamentations 2:15 Ezekiel 25:6 Nahum 3:19.

Shall hiss him, in token of their amazement, detestation, and derision. See 1 Kings 9:8 2 Chronicles 29:8 Jeremiah 25:9 Micah 6:16.

Out of his place; now that he is out of his place and power, which they durst not do whilst he was in his place. Or, the men of his place, that lived with him or near him, and daily felt the effects of his tyranny.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 27:23". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-27.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

23.Men shall clap It or he, used collectively. In the opinion of some, the storm is personified and represented as acting after the manner of men when they condemn and hiss a public character. The text properly supplies the word men. The accumulation of the terminations emo and omo (says Delitzsch) gives a tone of thunder and a gloomy impress to this conclusion of the description of judgment, as those terminations frequently occur in the book of Psalms, where moral depravity is mourned and divine judgment threatened.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 27:23". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-27.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 27:23. Men — Who shall see and observe these things; shall clap their hands at him — In token of their joy, at the removal of such a public pest and tyrant; and by way of astonishment, as also in contempt and scorn; all which this action signifies in Scripture. And shall hiss him out of his place In token of detestation and derision.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 27:23". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-27.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Place. God having waited patiently a long time, at last displays the effects of his indignation, with a sort of contempt, Proverbs i. 26., and Ezechiel v. 13. (Calmet) (Psalm ii. 4.) (Menochius) (Pineda) --- Every passenger who shall witness his fall, and his now abandoned place, shall also testify his approbation. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 27:23". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-27.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

When the wicked are overtaken, people in the world do rejoice or mock their downfall. Compare with Jeremiah 49:17; Ezek. 27:36; Zeph. 2:15.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 27:23". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-27.html. 1999-2014.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Men shall clap their hands at him, and shall hiss him out of his place.
clap
Esther 9:22-25; Proverbs 11:10; Lamentations 2:15; Revelation 18:20
hiss him
1 Kings 9:8; Jeremiah 19:8; Micah 6:16; Zephaniah 2:15 Reciprocal: Numbers 24:10 - he smote;  Job 34:37 - he clappeth;  Proverbs 10:7 - the name;  Jeremiah 50:13 - every;  Ezekiel 25:6 - thou hast;  Nahum 3:19 - shall

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 27:23". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-27.html.