Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 27:8

"For what is the hope of the godless when he is cut off, When God requires his life?
New American Standard

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Death;   Hope;   Hypocrisy;   Wicked (People);   Thompson Chain Reference - Expectation-Disappointment;   False;   Hope;   Hopes, False;   The Topic Concordance - Calling;   Hearing;   Hope;   Hypocrisy;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Hope;   Hypocrites;   Prayer, Answers to;  
Dictionaries:
Fausset Bible Dictionary - Prayer;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Job;   Providence;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Hypocrisy;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Gain;   Godless;   Hypocrisy;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

What is the hope of the hypocrite - The word חנף chaneph, which we translate, most improperly, hypocrite, means a wicked fellow, a defiled, polluted wretch, a rascal, a knave, a man who sticks at nothing in order to gain his ends. In this verse it means a dishonest man, a rogue, who by overreaching, cheating, etc., has amassed a fortune.

When God taketh away his soul? - Could he have had any well grounded hope of eternal blessedness when he was acquiring earthly property by guilt and deceit? And of what avail will this property be when his soul is summoned before the judgment-seat? A righteous man yields up his soul to God; the wicked does not, because he is afraid of God, of death, and of eternity. God therefore takes the soul away - forces it out of the body. Mr. Blair gives us an affecting picture of the death of a wicked man. Though well known, I shall insert it as a striking comment on this passage: -

"How shocking must thy summons be, O death!

To him that is at ease in his possessions;

Who, counting on long years of pleasures here;

Is quite unfurnished for that world to come!

In that dread moment how the frantic soul

Raves round the walls of her clay tenement;

Runs to each avenue, and shrieks for help,

But shrieks in vain! How wishfully she looks

On all she's leaving, now no longer hers!

A little longer, yet a little longer,

O, might she stay, to wash away her stains,

And fit her for her passage! Mournful sight!

Her very eyes weep blood; and every groan

She heaves is big with horror. But the foe,

Like a stanch murderer, steady to his purpose,

Pursues her close, through every lane of life,

Nor misses once the track, but presses on;

Till, forced at last to the tremendous verge,

At once she sinks to everlasting ruin."

The Grave.

The Chaldee has, What can the detractor expect who has gathered together (דשקר ממון mamon dishkar, the mammon of unrighteousness) when God plucks out his soul? The Septuagint: Τις γαρ εστιν ετι ελπις ασεβει, ὁτι επεχει; Μη πεποιθως επι Κυριον ει αρα σωθησεται ; "For what is the hope of the ungodly that he should wait for? shall he, by hoping in the Lord, be therefore saved?" Mr. Good translates differently from all the versions: -

"Yet what is the hope of the wicked that he should prosper,

That God should keep his soul in quiet?"

I believe our version gives as true a sense as any; and the words appear to have been in the eye of our Lord, when he said, "For what is a man profited if he shall gain the whole world and lose his own soul? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?" Matthew 16:26.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-27.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For what is the hope of the hypocrite? - The same sentiment which Job here advances had before been expressed by Bildad; see it explained in the notes at Job 8:13 following It had also been expressed in a similar manner by Zophar (see the notes on Job 20:5, and had been much insisted on in their arguments. Job now says that he fully accords with that belief. He was not disposed to defend hypocrisy; he had no sympathy for it. He knew, as they did, that all the joy of a hypocrite would be temporary, and that when death came it must vanish. He wishes that his remarks should not be construed so as to make him the advocate of hypocrisy or sin, and affirms that he relied on a more solid foundation of peace and joy than the hypocrite could possess. It was by explanations and admissions such as these that the controversy was gradually closed, and when they came fully to understand Job, they felt that they had nothing which they could reply to him.

Though he hath gained - - יבצע yı̂bâtsa‛ The Vulgate renders this, si avare rapiat - “if he avariciously seizes upon.” The Septuagint, ὅτι hoti ἐπἐχει epechei that he persisteth. Dr. Good, “That he should prosper;” and so Wemyss. The Hebrew word (בצע bâtsa‛ ) means properly, to cut or dash in pieces; then to tear in pieces, or to plunder or spoil; then to cut off, to bring to an end, etc. It is applied to the action of a weaver, who, when his web is finished, cuts off the thrum that binds it to the beam. The web is then finished; it is all woven, and is then taken from the loom. Hence, it is elegantly used to denote the close of life, when life is woven or finished - by the rapid passing of days like the weavers shuttle Job 7:6, and when it is then, as it were, taken out of the loom; see this figure explained in the notes at Isaiah 38:12. This is the idea here, that life would be cut off like the weaver‘s web, and that when that was done the hope of the hypocrite would be of no value.

When God taketh away his soul - When he dies. There has been much perplexity felt in regard to the Hebrew word here rendered “taketh away” - ישׁל yēshel A full explanation may be seen in Schultens and Rosenmuller. Some suppose it is the future from נשל for ישל - meaning to draw out, and that the idea is, that God draws out this life as a sword is drawn out of a sheath. Others, that it is from שלה - to be secure, or tranquil, or at rest: and that it refers to the time when God shall give rest in the grave, or that the meaning of the word שלה here is the same as שלל or נשל - to draw out; see Gesenius on the word שלה. Schnurrer conjectures that it is derived from שאל - to ask, to demand, and that the form here is contracted from the future ישאל. But the common supposition is, that it means to draw out - in allusion to drawing out a sword from a scabbard - thus drawing life or the soul from the body.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-27.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 27:8

For what is the hope of the hypocrite?

The character and hope of the hypocrite

I. The character of the hypocrite. By a hypocrite we understand not a self-deceiver, but a deceiver of others. To himself his real character is known, as it is also to God, the Judge of all; but it is hid from his fellow men, who are deceived by his plausible profession and fair speeches. The word implies that, like an ancient stage player, he acts under a mask, and personates a character which does not properly belong to him. The mask he wears is a form of godliness, and the part he acts is that of a religious man. His religion is only a counterfeit.

1. The hypocrite is a person whose outward conduct, upon the whole, is irreproachable in the sight of men.

2. His true character is far from coming up to the requirements of the Gospel. He is one whose heart is not right with God. His heart is unchanged, unrenewed, unsanctified, destitute of faith and humility, and without the love and fear of God.

3. The hypocrite does all his works to be seen of men. It is not God that he seeks to please. Self is the idol which he worships, and to which his incense is burned.

4. The hypocrite is partial and formal in his obedience. His obedience has respect only to some of the Commandments. The principle by which he is actuated is earthly and grovelling, leading him to seek only to have glory of men. Such a man has no portion in the life to come; he has no treasure in heaven.

II. The nature of his hope. Job takes for granted that the hypocrite may gain by his profession. He may, in many respects, succeed in obtaining the object of his wishes or the reward he covets. But what is his hope when God taketh away his soul? Consider--

1. The foundation on which his hope rests.

2. The author of his hope. Not God, but Satan.

3. The effects it produces.

Then let us examine ourselves by this test. There are some who do not go so far even as the hypocrite. Even he pays some deference to religion. What character do we bear? Let us beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy. Avoid hypocrisy and cultivate sincerity. Be Christians, not merely in name, but in reality. Build your hope on Christ alone, counting Him to be your greatest gain. (D. Rees.)

A warning to hypocrites

I. The fearful nature of religious hypocrisy. With all His mildness, gentleness, and compassion, we yet find Christ thundering against the hypocrite. There is a class of men who make a profession of religion which they know to be false. These are the persons whom the Redeemer denounces. A religious profession is undoubtedly an excellence, but this is the honest avowal of the religion that is already in the heart; taking care, that as the hypocrite hides his sins under a cloak, we should not hide our religion under a cloak, but should honestly avow that Saviour whom we profess to believe on in secret. Now that which is uttered and avowed before nil the world, because we have it in secret, is surely a different affair from a mere profession that is allied to an attempt to impose upon men, and setting the omniscience of God at defiance.

II. Vain are all warnings given to hypocrites, because hypocrisy hardens the heart. See the case of Judas. We ought to be made of glass, that every man may see what is our real character. We are more transparent than crystal before the eyes of the eternal God. The sin of false profession infatuates the mind, hardens the heart, and keeps a man always forming such false reasonings and conclusions that they lead at last to the most manifest overwhelming of him with his own crimes and with God’s judgment.

III. How vain are all the things on which the hypocrite places his hope when God arises to judgment. A man may accustom himself to falsehood until he makes lies his refuge, and can scarcely distinguish between the most gross imposition upon himself and sincere safe dealing. When men accustom themselves to a system of deceit, they get perfectly bewildered and know not that which a child would have known and expected.

IV. A life of hypocrisy is likely to end in a death of impenitence. The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination; the prayer only of the upright is God’s delight. We dare not think that a man, after living a life of hypocrisy, need only utter a few prayers and all is safe and well. True prayer is alone the prayer of true penitence. (James Bennett, D. D.)

The hypocrite’s hope

The teaching of the text may be summed up in this plain proposition--the hypocrite’s hope. How happy soever he may seem from it for a while, will leave him miserable when God shall take away his soul.

I. To whom the character of a hypocrite belongs. The word suggests, “one who acts in a play,” representing another person rather than his own. Transferred to religion, it is used to denote such as have put on a form of godliness, and would pass for saints, but are not in reality what they seem. The Hebrew word comes from one that signifies a cloud, as their wickedness is covered; or as they are painted over with another colour, hiding their natural one, that it may not be known. Thus an hypocrite is a real enemy to God, outwardly acting as one of His children. Open his character.

1. An hypocrite is one that pretends to have entirely devoted himself to God, when he has not, but divided his heart between God and the world; and so God has no interest in him at all. It is the whole heart God calls for, and He will have nothing less.

2. He is one that professes a regard to the will of God, as the reason, and to the glory of God as the end, of what he does in religion; when, in the meantime, he acts from other springs, and for lower and selfish ends.

3. He is one that takes more pains to appear outwardly religious than to be really so, between God and his own soul. A true Christian is as solicitous about his heart as about his life. But this is not the hypocrite’s concern. If he has a fair outside, he is little careful how matters stand within.

4. He is one that, in religious duties, puts God off with bodily service, whilst the heart is unengaged and left out.

5. He is partial and uneven in his obedience to God, and in his walk with Him.

II. Such may have a hope which they maintain as long as they live. It is strange that in souls so unsafe this hope should be so tong kept up. It is owing to such things as these--

1. To wretched ignorance of themselves, through neglecting to look into their own hearts.

2. To their not attending to the extent and spirituality of the law, as to what it requires of them, and how far they come short of obedience to it.

3. To the favourable apprehensions others may have of them.

4. To comparing themselves with open sinners, or more loose professors.

5. To the length they may go as to the attainment of what looks like grace.

III. What hypocrites may be said for a while to gain. It is supposed that some advantage they aim at, and may also reach.

1. By the part they act, they may gain more of the world.

2. They may gain the esteem and applause of men, and have the reputation of being eminently holy and religious.

3. They may gain a sort of peace in their own minds.

4. They may hereupon gain a smooth passage through the world, and an easy going out of it.

5. They may have a pompous funeral, and be well spoken of when they are dead.

IV. The vanity and emptiness of the hypocrite’s hope and gain, and the certainty and dreadfulness of his misery when God taketh away his soul.

1. What is the hope of the hypocrite? A hope without ground, without fruit; and a hope that will not hold before the Judge.

2. What is the gain of the hypocrite? It is unsuitable to his soul, his better part. It is bounded within this present life, and can accompany him no further. Then take up with no hope but such as will stand you in stead when God shall take away your soul.

The hypocrite’s hope

I. To whom the character in the text applies. To all those who, in the concerns of religion, act a different part to what they really are. Particularly it applies--

1. To those who pretend entire devotedness to God, while their hearts are divided (Psalms 12:2)
.

2. Who profess a regard to the will of God as the reason, and His glory as the end, of what they do in religion; while, at the same time, they act from other springs, and for lower and selfish ends (Matthew 6:1).

3. Who are more careful to appear outwardly religious, than to be really so between God and their own souls (Matthew 23:27-28).

4. Who put God off with bodily service, while the heart is not engaged in it (Isaiah 29:13; John 4:24).

5. Who are partial in their obedience to God, while the real Christian says Psalms 119:128.

II. The hope and the gain of such a character.

1. Their hope relates to a future state of blessedness.

2. It is groundless, without a solid foundation (Colossians 1:27).

3. It is fruitless. See the Christian’s hope, 1 John 3:3.

4. It will be cut off (Matthew 7:23).

And this false hope is generally owing--

1. To ignorance of themselves; their own hearts.

2. To want of attention to the extent and spirituality of the law of God (Romans 7:9).

3. The favourable opinion others have of them.

4. Comparing themselves with open sinners, or lukewarm professors (Luke 18:11).

5. The length they go, as to the exercise of what appears to be grace; abstaining from many sins; practising many religious duties, etc.

As to their acquisitions; they may gain--

1. More of this world.

2. The esteem and applause of men.

3. A false peace (Revelation 3:17).

4. A smooth passage through life.

5. A pompous funeral. But, behold--

III. The dreadful end of such; expressed in these words, “When God taketh away his soul.”

1. His soul, his immortal part, which he has deceived and ruined.

2. God will take it away; whose power there is no resisting; from whose presence there is no escape.

3. He will take it away; perhaps with violence (Proverbs 14:32), always in displeasure.

4. Take it away from present gains and hopes, to real misery, and to the greatest share of it. To all this he is continually liable, and at no time safe from it. While he is crying, Peace, peace, sudden destruction is coming upon him.

Improvement--

1. Seriously examine as to your own character. Judge yourselves, that ye be not judged.

2. Dread nothing more than the hypocrite’s hope, and frequently look to the foundation of your own.

3. Bless God if you can give a reason for the hope that is in you; but do it with fear and trembling; the final judgment is not yet over.

4. Do nothing to sink your hope, or fill you with overwhelming fear. Think often what you hope for, whom you hope in, and of the ground you hope upon; and thus prepare for the fruition of your hope in eternal glory. (T. Hannam.)

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 27:8". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-27.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

WHAT IS THE HOPE OF THE GODLESS?

"For what is the hope of the godless though he get him gain,

When God taketh away his soul?

Will God hear his cry

When trouble cometh upon him?

Will he delight himself in the Almighty,

And call upon God at all times?

I will teach you concerning the hand of God;

That which is with the Almighty I will not conceal.

Behold, all ye yourselves have seen it;

Why then are ye become altogether vain."

"Will he delight himself in the Almighty, and call upon God at all times" (Job 27:10)? Job here points out the fundamental difference between himself and the wicked, that difference being simply that Job delights in the Almighty and calls upon God at all times. Such things the wicked do not. "Job's friends should have recognized that in Job's persistent crying to God there was the proof that their identification of Job with the godless was false."[7]

"I will teach you concerning the hand of God" (Job 27:11) Job here proposes to teach his friends some basic truths concerning God. Why do they need teaching? "They have become altogether vain" (Job 27:12). They have wickedly judged Job; and throughout this whole section Job emphasizes the fate of the wicked, because by their evil words against Job they have themselves joined the forces of wickedness. Thus his friends need the warning.

Of course, this chapter is disputed, some claiming that it is actually a mislabeled speech of Zophar, not pertaining to Job at all. Franks called Job 27:7-23 of this chapter, "The missing third speech of Zophar";[8] and Watson also accepted the authorship of Zophar for this passage as, "By far the best explanation of an otherwise incomprehensible passage."[9] Anderson noted that this device of making the passage the speech of Zophar, "Has enjoyed considerable prestige among scholars for two centuries."[10]

Nevertheless, this writer rejects this explanation as being unproved and unprovable. Furthermore, there is not anything that Job said in this chapter that is inconsistent either with the truth or with what Job had previously said. The critical scholars have simply misunderstood what Job is saying here, and throughout the Book of Job.

"Job's prediction here of the judgment of God upon the godless is not a belated conversion to his friends' point of view .... Nowhere has Job denied the justice of God; and it is not inconsistent for him to affirm it here."[11] In fact, throughout Job's speeches, the one thing that has separated Job from his friends is their neat little system of making Job a gross sinner because of his sufferings. The two great errors in their allegations were (1) that God punishes all wickedness in this life, and does so immediately after the sins are committed, and (2) that any sufferer, from what ever disease or calamity, is suffering the just reward of his sins. Job never denied either that righteousness tends toward happiness or that wickedness tends in the other direction.

Dr. Hesser stressed these same facts as follows: "Job believed that the wicked will pay for their sins, that sins lead to misery; but what he did not believe was that neat little formula in which exactly the right amount of suffering is immediately dealt out to all sinners. There is therefore no good reason for assigning this passage to Zophar instead of to Job."[12] Jamieson was in full agreement with this.[13]

Matthew Henry also noted another reason why Job in this passage spoke so dramatically about God's judgment of the wicked. "It was fittingly brought in here as a reason why Job would not deny his integrity."[14] We have already noted that it was likewise a fitting warning to his friends who had so wickedly accused him.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-27.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For what is the hope of the hypocrite,.... In religion, who seems to be what he is not, a holy and righteous man; professes to have what he has not, the grace of God; pretends to do what he does not, worship God sincerely and fervently, and does all he does to be seen of men; though such a man may have an hope, as he has, of an interest in the divine layout, and of eternal glory and happiness, what will it signify? what avail will it be unto him? what will it issue in? Job was of the same mind in this with Bildad and Zophar, that such a man's hope is as the spider's web, and as the giving up of the ghost, Job 8:14; however he may please himself with it in this life, it will be of no service to him at death; for it is not like that of the true believer's, that is sure and steadfast, and founded upon the perfect righteousness and sacrifice of Christ; but upon his outward substance, fancying, that because God prospers him in this world, he is highly in his favour, and shall enjoy the happiness of the world to come; and upon his external profession of religion, and found of duties performed by him, but he will find himself mistaken: though he hath gained; great wealth and riches under a guise of religion, and by that means making gain of godliness, and taking the one for the other; so the Targum,

"because he hath gathered the mammon of falsehood;'

and also has great gifts, and a great deal of head knowledge, being able to talk of and dispute about most points of religion, and so has gained a great name among men both for knowledge and holiness, and yet all will not stand him in any stead, or be of any advantage to him:

when God taketh away his soul? out of his body by death, as a sword is drawn out of its scabbard, and which is as easily done by him; or as a shoe is plucked off from the foot, as Aben Ezra, and what he has a right to do, and will do it: and this taking it away seems to be in a violent manner, though not by what is called a violent death, yet against the will of the person; a good man is willing to die, is desirous of it, and gives up the ghost cheerfully; but an hypocrite is not willing to die, being afraid of death, and therefore his life or soul is taken from him without his consent and will, and not in love but in wrath, as the latter part of this chapter shows. Now Job had an hope which bore him up under all his troubles, and which he retained in the most killing and distressed circumstances, and which continued with him, and supported him in the views of death and eternity, so that he could look upon death, and into another world, with pleasure, and therefore could be no hypocrite, see Job 13:15.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-27.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

For what [is] the f hope of the hypocrite, though he hath gained, when God taketh away his soul?

(f) What advantage has the dissembler to gain, seeing he will lose his own soul?
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-27.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

“What hope hath the hypocrite, notwithstanding all his gains, when?” etc. “Gained” is antithetic to “taketh away.” Umbreit‘s translation is an unmeaning tautology. “When God cuts off, when He taketh away his life.”

taketh away — literally, “draws out” the soul from the body, which is, as it were, its scabbard (Job 4:21; Psalm 104:29; Daniel 7:15). Job says that he admits what Bildad said (Job 8:13) and Zophar (Job 20:5). But he says the very fact of his still calling upon God (Job 27:10) amid all his trials, which a hypocrite would not dare to do, shows he is no “hypocrite.”

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-27.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For what is the hope of the hypocrite, though he hath gained, when God taketh away his soul?

Though — Though they prosper in the world. God, as the judge takes it away, to be tried, and determined to its everlasting state. And what will his hope be then? It will be vanity and a lie; it will stand him in no stead.

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Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-27.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 27:8 For what [is] the hope of the hypocrite, though he hath gained, when God taketh away his soul?

Ver. 8. For what is the hope of the hypocrite, &c.] Here Job proveth himself to be no hypocrite, by his and their different character and carriage, especially under affliction. Though God kill Job, yet he will trust in him; but "what is the hope of the hypocrite?" &c. He that maketh a bridge of his own shadow must needs fall into the brook. The common hope thinks it takes hold of God; but it is but as a child that catcheth at the shadow on the wall, which he thinks he holdeth fast in his hand, but soon finds it otherwise; so shall the hypocrite at death, his hope shall be then as the giving up of the ghost, and that is but cold comfort. While he was in health, and had all well about him, he nourished strong hopes of God’s favour, and the rather because he gained and gathered wealth apace. So bladder like is the soul that is filled with earthly vanities, though but wind, it grows great, and swells in high conceitedness; but if pricked with the least pin of piercing grief (how much more when struck with death’s dart!) it shriveleth to nothing, and is ready to say, as one rich wretch did on his death bed, Spes et fortuna valete, Life and hope, adieu to you both at once.

Though he hath gained] Or, When he hath been covetous; raking together Rem, rem, quocunque modo rem. See this notably exemplified in that rich fool, Luke 12:20, whose life and hopes ended together.

When God taketh away his soul?] Extrahet, Shall pull it out by violence, as a sword out of his sheath; when God shall make a breach upon their citadel, come upon them by forcible entry, turn them out of their cottages of clay, by a firmae eiectione, cut them in twain, as he did that evil servant, Matthew 24:50-51, tear their bodies and souls asunder, as a man teareth the bark from the tree, or the shell from the fish, leaving it naked. Where, then, shall be the high hopes of the hypocrite? And oh what a dreadful shriek giveth his guilty soul then, to see itself launching into an infinite ocean of scalding lead, and to consider that it must swim naked in it for ever!

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 27:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-27.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

There is no reason why I should envy or desire the portion of wicked men; for though they ofttimes prosper in the world, as I have said, and seem to be great gainers, yet death, which hasteneth to all men, and to me especially, will show that they are far greater losers, and die in a most wretched and desperate condition; having no hope either of continuing in this life, which they chiefly desire, or of enjoying a better life, which they never regarded. But I have a firm and well-grounded hope, not of that temporal restitution which you promised me, but of a blessed immortality after death, and therefore am none of these hopeless hypocrites, as you account me. Taketh away; or, expelleth, or plucketh up; which notes violence, and that he died unwillingly; compare Luke 12:20; when good men are said freely and cheerfully to give themselves or their souls unto God.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 27:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-27.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8.For — Job appeals to the want of religious experience on the part of the ungodly to show that he cannot be accounted such.

Gained (unjustly) — Thus the Syriac, Chaldee, Vulgate, Arnheim, Gesenius, Furst, etc. The exhaustive comment of Tayler Lewis abundantly shows that Zockler, (in Lange,) Dillmann, etc., are wrong in reading , “When he cutteth off.” The transition from the prime meaning of batsa’h, “break off,” “plunder” (for gain,) to its secondary meaning “gain,” is easy and natural. The construction of Zockler, etc., mixes the metaphor, and demands, contrary to Hebrew usage, the same subject for two successive verbs, each preceded by ; also it destroys the parallelism. The resemblance between the text and the profound question of Christ (Mark 8:36) is worthy of note.

Taketh away — Literally, Draweth out, as a sword from its sheath, as in Daniel 7:15, (see margin,) where the body is called a sheath. The Talmud, the Hindu, and the Roman, (Pliny,) use the same metaphor. The Hindu Vedanta says, “The soul is in the body as in a sheath.” — COLEBROOK, Misc. Essays, 1:372. Gesenius (Thes., 855) cites a philosopher who, being despised by Alexander on account of his ugliness, responded: “The body is nothing but the sheath of a sword in which the soul is concealed.” While the figure of the text painfully expresses the resistance of the soul against its severance from the body, (compare Genesis 35:18,) it assumes a separate existence for the soul. To speak of hope for a man after his death, unless the soul be conscious, would be a palpable absurdity. The passage is among the many of this book that take for granted the conscious existence of the wicked after death, and by implication the immortality of all.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-27.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 27:8. What is the hope of the hypocrite, though he hath gained? — There is no reason why I should envy or desire the portion of wicked men: although they ofttimes prosper in the world, and seem to be great gainers; yet death, which hasteneth to all men, and to me especially, will show that they are far greater losers, and die in a most wretched and desperate condition, having no hope either of continuing in this life, which they chiefly desire, or of enjoying a better life, which they never regarded. But I have a firm and well-grounded hope, not of that temporal restitution which you promise, but of a blessed immortality after death; and therefore I am not a hopeless hypocrite, as you think me to be. When God taketh away his soul — When, much against his will, and by an act of violence, (as the word ישׁל, jeshel, here used, signifies,) God, as the Judge, takes his soul out of his body, that it may be tried and determined to its everlasting state. What will his hope be then? It will be vanity and a lie; it will stand him in no stead. The wealth of this world, which he hoped in, he must leave behind him, and the happiness of the other world, which he hoped for, he will certainly fall short of; his hopes, therefore, will disappoint and make him ashamed.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 27:8". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-27.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Soul, in death: What will it profit? &c., Matthew xvi. 26. All this proves demonstratively another world. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-27.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

what . . . ? Figure of speech Erotesis. App-6.

taketh away his soul. By a different division of the letters it means "when he lifteth up his soul to God", or "when God demandeth his soul".

his soul = himself; or, his life. Hebrew. nephesh. App-13.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-27.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For what is the hope of the hypocrite, though he hath gained, when God taketh away his soul?

'What hope hath the hypocrite, notwithstanding all his gains, when?' etc. "Gained" [batsaa`] is antithetic to "taketh away.'' Umbreit's a translation is an unmeaning tautology: 'When God cuts off, when He taketh away his life,'

Taketh away - literally, draws out the soul from the body, which is, as it were, its scabbard (Job 4:21; Psalms 104:29; Daniel 7:15, "body." margin, sheath; cf. 2 Peter 1:14). Job says he admits what Bildad said (Job 8:13), and Zophar (Job 20:5). But he says the very fact of his still calling upon God (Job 27:10), amidst all his trials, which a hypocrite would not dare to do, shows he is no "hypocrite."

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-27.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) What is the hope?—Better, What is the hope of the godless, though he get him gain, when God taketh away his soul?

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-27.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For what is the hope of the hypocrite, though he hath gained, when God taketh away his soul?
11:20; 13:16; 15:34; 20:5; 31:3; Isaiah 33:14,15; Matthew 16:26; 23:14; Mark 8:36,37; Luke 9:25; 12:20,21; 1 Timothy 6:9,10; James 5:1-3
Reciprocal: Job 5:3 - taking;  Job 8:13 - the hypocrite's;  Job 14:19 - destroyest;  Job 35:13 - God;  Job 36:13 - they;  Psalm 66:18 - If I regard;  Psalm 73:17 - then;  Psalm 120:3 - What shall;  Proverbs 10:22 - he;  Ecclesiastes 5:8 - regardeth;  Ecclesiastes 9:4 - GeneralIsaiah 1:15 - when;  Ezekiel 20:31 - and shall;  Hosea 5:15 - in their;  Matthew 6:5 - thou shalt not;  Matthew 13:21 - dureth;  Mark 4:17 - have;  Luke 12:1 - which;  Luke 18:1 - that;  John 9:31 - we know;  Romans 5:5 - hope;  Romans 12:12 - continuing;  Colossians 4:2 - Continue;  James 4:3 - and

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 27:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-27.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Job 27:8

"For what is the hope of the hypocrite, though he has gained, when God takes away his soul? Will God hear his cry when trouble comes upon him? Will he delight himself in the Almighty? Will he always call upon God?" Job 27:8-10

Many of God"s people are at times exercised as to their hypocrisy, and sometimes they may think themselves the most consummate hypocrites that ever stood in a profession. But if you are exercised with these painful surmises, these doubts and fears, just see (and the Lord enable you to bring it to the light of his countenance) these two features of a spiritual character. Do not talk about your hope; it may be "a spider"s web." Do not boast of your gifts; they may be altogether in the flesh. Do not bring forward the good opinion of men; they may be deceived concerning you. But just see if, with the Lord"s blessing, you can feel these two tests in your soul, as written there by his own hand. If Song of Solomon, you are not a hypocrite; God himself, by his servant Job, has acquitted you of the charge.

Did you, then, ever "delight yourself in the Almighty?" It is a solemn question. Did your heart and soul ever go out after the living God? Did affection, love, and gratitude ever flow out of your bosom into the bosom of the Lord? Did you ever feel as if you could clasp him in the arms of faith, and live and die in his embrace? Now if your soul has ever felt this, you are no hypocrite; and nothing can rise up out of your wretched heart, as an accusing devil, that can prove you to be one.

Or if you cannot fully realize this, if you are one that always calls upon God, you are no hypocrite. I do not speak of your regular prayers, or any other of your regularities; for I believe that there is often more of God"s Spirit, and more craving after God and delighting in him, in your irregularities, than in all the daily regularities which hypocrites delight in. But I mean, is there a sigh or cry by night, as well as by day; a pouring out of the heart into the bosom of God from time to time, as the Lord works it in you, in trouble, in perplexity, in sorrow, and in distress? This is a test and a mark which no hypocrite ever had or ever can have.

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Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Job 27:8". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/job-27.html.