Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 30:1

"But now those younger than I mock me, Whose fathers I disdained to put with the dogs of my flock.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Children;   Dog (Sodomite?);   Mocking;   Persecution;   Scoffing;   Shepherd;   Thompson Chain Reference - Derision;   Disrespect for Old Age;   Job;   Old Age;   Young People;   Youth, Sins of;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Dog, the;   Scorning and Mocking;   Sheep;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Shepherd;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Dog;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Shepherd;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Animals;   Dog;   Job, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Dog;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Dog ;   Laughter;   Sheep, Shepherd;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Abjects, Nekeh;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Dog;   Sheep;   Shepherd;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Dog,;   Sheep;   Shepherd;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Derision;   Dog;   Shepherd;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Dog;   Job, Testament of;   Shepherd;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

But now they that are younger than I have me in derision - Compare this with Job 29:8, where he speaks of the respect he had from the youth while in the days of his prosperity. Now he is no longer affluent, and they are no longer respectful.

Dogs of my flock - Persons who were not deemed sufficiently respectable to be trusted with the care of those dogs which were the guardians of my flocks. Not confidential enough to be made shepherds, ass-keepers, or camel-drivers; nor even to have the care of the dogs by which the flocks were guarded. This saying is what we call an expression of sovereign contempt.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-30.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

But now they that are younger than I - Margin, “of fewer days.” It is not probable that Job here refers to his three friends. It is not possible to determine their age with accuracy, but in Job 15:10, they claim that there were with them old and very aged men, much older than the father of Job. Though that place may possibly refer not to themselves but to those who held the same opinions with them, yet none of those who engaged in the discussion, except Ehhu Job 32:6, are represented as young men. They were the contemporaries of Job; men who are ranked as his friends; and men who showed that they had had oppoptunities for long and careful observation. The reference here, therefore, is to the fact that while, in the days of his prosperity, even the aged and the honorable rose up to do him reverence, now he was the object of contempt even by the young and the worthless. The Orientals would feel this much. It was among the chief virtues with them to show respect to the aged, and their sensibilites were especially keen in regard to any indignity shown to them by the young.

Whose fathers I would have disdained - Who are the children of the lowest and most degraded of the community. How deep the calamity to be so fallen as to be the subject of derision by such men!

To have set with the dogs of my flock - To have associated with my dogs in guarding my flock. That is, they were held in less esteem than his dogs. This was the lowest conceivable point of debasement. The Orientals had no language that would express greater contempt of anyone than to call him a dog; compare Deuteronomy 23:18; 1 Samuel 17:43; 1 Samuel 24:14; 2 Samuel 3:8; 2 Samuel 9:8; 2 Samuel 16:9; 2 Kings 8:13; Note Isaiah 66:3.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-30.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

JOB 30

JOB'S PRESENT DISTRESS -

THE SECOND MEMBER OF THE TRILOGY: JOB'S SUFFERINGS

In this chapter, Job's period of suffering and distress is vividly contrasted with the glory and honor of the days of his exaltation. "This chapter is perhaps the most pathetic of all Job's poems of grief and a fitting finish to all the earlier ones."[1]

"The repetition of `But now ... and now ... and now' in Job 30:1,9,16 effectively accents the themes in which Job contrasts the bleak, turbulent present with the peaceful past. The king of counselors has become the byword of fools (Job 30:1-15). The friendly favor of God has `turned into cruelty."[2]

This beautiful paragraph just quoted from Meredith G. Kline concludes with a sentence which we must reject, because God is not cruel, unmerciful, unfeeling or, in any manner whatever, disinterested in the trials and struggles of men. In the epilogue (Job 42) the Bible flatly declares that Job spoke the truth about God; and the interpreters, including many others besides Kline, are wrong in attributing sentiments and even sayings to Job that contradict the universal description of God, throughout every page of the Bible, as even Jonah stated it, "I knew that thou art a gracious God, merciful, slow to anger, and abundant in loving kindness, and repentest thee of the evil" (Jonah 4:2). We shall cite other scholarly opinions in this chapter which are erroneous in this vital particular.

THE KING OF COUNSELORS NOW THE BYWORD OF FOOLS

Job 30:1-9

"But now they that are younger than I have me in derision,

Whose fathers I disdained to set with the dogs of my flock.

Yea, the strength of their hands, whereto should it profit me?

Men in whom ripe age[3] is perished.

They are gaunt with want and famine;

They gnaw the dry ground, in the gloom of wasteness and desolation.

They pluck salt-wort by the bushes;

And the roots of the broom are their food.

They are driven forth from the midst of men;

They cry after them as after a thief;

So that they dwell in frightful valleys,

In holes of the earth and of the rocks.

Under the bushes they bray;

Under the nettles they are gathered together.

They are children of fools, yea, children of base men;

They were scourged out of the land.

And now I am become their song,

Yea, I am a byword unto them."

This section describes the rejected refuse of humanity, the malcontents, the idle, the indolent, the off-scouring of the social order, which some would call the scum of the earth, the point being that even the bottom of the totem pole in their culture considered Job as inferior to themselves; and they derided and mocked him in songs and verbal taunts.

Job has been criticized by some for his low-evaluation of these people; but, in fairness, it should be observed that the evaluation here was not Job's; it was the evaluation and judgment of the whole society in which he lived.

Watson summarized these verses as follows: "These people were gaunt with hunger and vice, herded in the wilderness where alone they were allowed to exist, eating salt-wort and broom-roots for food. The appearance of one of them prompted cries of `thieves and robbers.' They lived in caves, and among the rocks; like wild asses they brayed in the scrub and gathered among the nettles. Base men, children of fools, having dishonored humanity, they had been whipped out of the land. Even these abhorred Job, mocking him in song and byword, even spitting in his face."[4]

Blair pointed out that, "These people refused to work, and were too proud to beg."[5] This left them the option of stealing and/or scrounging for whatever they might find in the wilderness. In neither the Old Testament nor the New Testament, can there be found any acceptance of people who will not work. In the Decalogue, the word from heaven is, "Six days shalt thou labor." And in the New Testament, the Divine Commandment stands: "He that will not work, don't let him eat"! (2 Thessalonians 3:10).

"Under the bushes they bray" (Job 30:7). Rawlinson interpreted this to mean that, "The speech of those people sounded to Job more like the braying of asses than articulate speech."[6] For reasons which are by no means clear to this writer, Driver and Peake gave the meaning here as, "They bray like donkeys under the influence of lust, and copulate with no better bed than a patch of nettles."[7] Pope insisted that, "There is no sexual connotation here, as Peake suggested."[8] This writer is familiar with the behavior of donkeys; and their braying is closely related to hunger, not sex. Rowley was also aware of this connection between hunger and the braying of donkeys.[9]

"And now I am become their song; yea, I am a byword unto them" (Job 30:9). This verse belongs both to the preceding verses and to those afterward. "Job continues his lament over his changed condition; but, whereas in the preceding verses he has concentrated on the character of his tormentors, here he begins to dwell upon the effect of their torments upon him."[10]

The eloquent words of Kline catch the spirit of these verses perfectly: "Even the juveniles of this rabble (Job 30:1) regard Job as the fitting butt of their derisive ditties (Job 30:9). No show of contempt is too mean for them (Job 30:10), as with unbridled spite (Job 30:11b) they devise torments (Job 30:12ff) against this ruined bourgeois, now a helpless outcast upon their dunghill domain."[11]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-30.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

But now they that are younger than I have me in derision,.... Meaning not his three friends, who were men in years, and were not, at least all of them, younger than he, see Job 15:10; nor were they of such a mean extraction, and such low-lived creatures, and of such characters as here described; with such Job would never have held a correspondence in the time of his prosperity; both they and their fathers, in all appearance, were both great and good; but these were a set of profligate and abandoned wretches, who, as soon as Job's troubles came upon him, derided him, mocked and jeered at him, both by words and gestures; and which they might do even before his three friends came to him, and during their seven days' silence with him, and while this debate was carrying on between them, encouraged unto it by their behaviour towards him; to be derided by any is disagreeable to flesh and blood, though it is the common lot of good men, especially in poor and afflicted circumstances, and to be bore patiently; but to be so used by junior and inferior persons is an aggravation of it; as Job was, even by young children, as was also the prophet Elisha, 2 Kings 2:23; see Job 19:18;

whose fathers I would have disdained to have set with the dogs of my flock; either to have compared them with the dogs that kept his flock from the wolves, having some good qualities in them which they had not; for what more loving or faithful to their masters, or more vigilant and watchful of their affairs? or to set them at meat with the dogs of his flock; they were unworthy of it, though they would have been glad of the food his dogs ate of, they living better than they, whose meat were mallows and juniper roots, Job 30:4; and would have jumped at it; as the prodigal in want and famine, as those men were, would fain have filled his belly with husks that swine did eat; but as no man gave them to him, so Job disdained to give the meat of his dogs to such as those; or to set them "over"F13עם כלבי "super canes", Noldius, p. 739. No. 1825. the dogs of his flock, to be the keepers of them, to be at the head of his dogs, and to have the command of them; see the phrase in 2 Samuel 3:8; or else to join them with his dogs, to keep his flock with them; they were such worthless faithless wretches, that they were not to be trusted with the care of his flock along with his dogs. It was usual in ancient times, as well as in ours, for dogs to be made use of in keeping flocks of sheep from beasts of prey, as appears from OrpheusF14De Lapidibus, Hypoth. ver. 53, 54. , HomerF15Iliad. 10. ως κυνες περι μηλα, &c. v. 183. & Iliad 12. v. 303. , TheocritusF16 χ' αμιν εστι κυων φιλοποιμνιος, &c. Idyll. 5. v. 106. & Idyll. 6. v. 9, 10. , and other writers: and if the fathers of those that derided Job were such mean, base, worthless creatures, what must their sons be, inferior to them in age and honour, if any degree of honour belonged to them?

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-30.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

But now [they that are] younger than I a have me in derision, whose fathers I would have disdained to have set with the b dogs of my flock.

(a) That is, my estate is changed and while before the ancient men were glad to revere me, the young men now contemn me.

(b) Meaning to be my shepherds or to keep my dogs.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-30.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

younger — not the three friends (Job 15:10; Job 32:4, Job 32:6, Job 32:7). A general description: Job 30:1-8, the lowness of the persons who derided him; Job 30:9-15, the derision itself. Formerly old men rose to me (Job 29:8). Now not only my juniors, who are bound to reverence me (Leviticus 19:32), but even the mean and base-born actually deride me; opposed to, “smiled upon” (Job 29:24). This goes farther than even the “mockery” of Job by relations and friends (Job 12:4; Job 16:10, Job 16:20; Job 17:2, Job 17:6; Job 19:22). Orientals feel keenly any indignity shown by the young. Job speaks as a rich Arabian emir, proud of his descent.

dogs — regarded with disgust in the East as unclean (1 Samuel 17:43; Proverbs 26:11). They are not allowed to enter a house, but run about wild in the open air, living on offal and chance morsels (Psalm 59:14, Psalm 59:15). Here again we are reminded of Jesus Christ (Psalm 22:16). “Their fathers, my coevals, were so mean and famished that I would not have associated them with (not to say, set them over) my dogs in guarding my flock.”

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-30.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

But now they that are younger than I have me in derision, whose fathers I would have disdained to have set with the dogs of my flock.

Younger — Whom both universal custom, and the light of nature, taught to reverence their elders and betters.

Whose fathers — Whose condition was so mean, that in the opinion, of the world, they were unworthy to be my shepherds the companions of my dogs which watch my flocks.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-30.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 30:1 But now [they that are] younger than I have me in derision, whose fathers I would have disdained to have set with the dogs of my flock.

Ver. 1. But now they that are younger than I have me in derision] Id quod ei morbo suo longe gravius fuerit, sicut et Hebraei testantur, saith Mercer. This troubled him much more than all his sores and sicknesses; that every young shackrag slighted him, and laughed him to scorn. In this case especially,

- Faciles motus mens generosa capit (Ovid).

You shall find some, saith Erasmus, that if death be threatened, can despise it; but to be despised or belied they cannot brook; but least of all by base persons: Quilibet ab aquila quam corvo discerpi mavult. Job was now grown ancient, and had been honourable, as he had set forth, Job 29:1-25. Old age and honour, in the Greek tongue, are near akin, Cognata sunt, γηρας et γερας, ut ηθος et εθος; and,

Summa fuit quondam capitis reverentia cani:

Inque sue precio ruga senilis erat.

But it is a sign of gasping devotion, and that things are far out of order, when the child behaveth himself proudly against the ancient, and the base against the honourable, Isaiah 3:5, as at Bethel, where those poorly bred children derided the old prophet, and petulantly cried after him, "Go up, thou bald head; go up, thou bald head," 2 Kings 2:23. If the like unworthy usage befall us, let it suffice us that our betters, Job, David, Christ himself, have sped no better. Art not thou glad to fare as Phocion? said he to a lowly man that was to die with him.

Whose fathers I would have disdained to have set with the dogs of my flock] i.e. To have made my dog keepers, that they might feed with them, as the prodigal son did with the swine. Dogs are commonly looked upon as paltry carrion creatures; only some, for their mind’s sake, and others, for certain necessary uses, as shepherds and hunters, make some reckoning of them. It was not permitted to a dog to enter into the Acropolis, or tower of Athens, for his libidinousness and ill savour, δια του ακολαστου και δυσωδους (Plut.). At Rome they crucified a dog yearly, in detestation of those dogs in the capitol that gave not warning of the approach of an enemy. Job, it seems, had his dog feeders, men of meanest account. Now these men’s sons, a beggarly breed, and very rascals, insulted and trampled upon this precious man, dealt as basely and coarsely with him, haply, as those factious fellows in Geneva did with reverend Calvin; whom they not only in contempt called Cain (as Athanasius was sometimes by his enemies called Sathanasius; and Cyprian, Coprian, that is, a dunghill fellow), but also named their dogs Calvin, as Beza, in his Life, reporteth.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 30:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-30.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

CHAP. XXX.

Job goes on to lament the change of his former condition, and sets forth the contempt into which his adversity had brought him.

Before Christ 1645.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 30:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-30.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

Job is still prosecuting his discourse in this chapter. Having in the former, pointed out-the day of his prosperity, he here draws a melancholy contrast, in a view of the state of adversity to which He is now brought.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-30.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

JOB CHAPTER 30

Job’s honour is turned into contempt, Job 30:1-14; his prosperity into calamity, fears, pains, despicableness, Job 30:15-19; notwithstanding his prayer now, and his former charity, and hope, Job 30:20-26. His great sorrow, Job 30:27-31.

But now my condition is sadly changed for the worse.

They that are younger than I whom both universal custom and the light of nature taught to reverence their elders and betters.

Have me in derision; make me the object of their contempt and scoffs: thus my glory is turned into shame.

I would have disdained; or rather, I might have disdained, i.e. whose condition was so mean and vile, that in the opinion and according to the custom of the world they were unworthy of such an employment.

To have set with the dogs of my flock; to be my shepherds, and the companions of my dogs which watch my flocks. Dogs are every where mentioned with contempt, as filthy, unprofitable, and accursed creatures; as 2 Samuel 16:9 2 Kings 8:13 Philippians 3:2 Revelation 22:15.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 30:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-30.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

First strophe — Formerly a prince among nobles, Job is now grossly maltreated by hordes of pariahs, whose mode of life links them with beasts rather than with men, Job 30:1-8.

1.The dogs — In the East the dog serves as a symbol for every kind of uncleanness, (Revelation 22:15,) and is universally abhorred. The scoffers Job speaks of were not fit to associate with dogs. Mohammed says, “Angels will enter no house where are dogs and pictures.” In his annals, Sardanapalus speaks of a captive king, “With the dogs I placed him, and I caused him to be chained.” — Column 8:29.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-30.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 30:1. But now, &c. — Job having, in the foregoing chapter, described the honour of his former condition, goes on here, by way of contrast, to describe the vileness of his present state. They that are younger than I — Whom both universal custom and the light of nature taught to reverence their elders and betters; have me in derision — Make me the object of their contempt and scoffs: thus my glory is turned into shame. Whose fathers I would have disdained — Or, rather, might have disdained; that is, whose condition was so mean and vile, that in the opinion, and according to the custom of the world, they were unworthy to be my shepherds, and the companions of my dogs, which watch my flocks. This and the seven following verses are an exaggerated description of the vileness of those to whom he was now become a derision, notwithstanding all his former authority.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 30:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-30.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Flock, to watch over them. (Sanchez) (Calmet) --- I had so little confidence in them, (Haydock) or they were so very mean. (Calmet) --- They were not as well fed as my dogs. (Nicetas.) --- Job does not speak this out of contempt, as he was affable to all. But this proverbial expression denotes how vile these people were. (Menochius) --- Even the most contemptible, and such as were not fit to have the care of dogs, derided him. (Worthington)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-30.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"But now those younger than I mock me": Young people, rather than respecting him, ridiculed and made fun of him, compare with 29:8. "Whose fathers I disdained to put with the dogs of my flock": "Worst of all, his tormentators are the young men upon whom all the rest of the society looks down with contempt. At one time, Job would not even hire their fathers to watch his dogs. They represent all the waste and wickedness that he avoided in his disciplined and righteous life" (McKenna p. 208). Job had the respect of the most respectable and now he has the contempt of the most contemptible (Andersen p. 235). "To be disgraced by peers or superiors would be distressing enough, but he was derided by those who were so low that he would not even put their fathers with the dogs of his flock" (Zuck p. 130). Please note that Job is not prejudiced against the poor, in fact he has helped many people who were less fortunate (29:12). Job is venting his disgust for the low-life who choose to be low-life.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-30.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

I. Note the "I" of adversity in Job 30. See note on Job 29:2.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-30.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

But now they that are younger than I have me in derision, whose fathers I would have disdained to have set with the dogs of my flock.

Younger - not the three friends (Job 15:10; Job 22:4; Job 22:6-7). A general description: Job 30:1-8, The lowness of the persons who derided him; Job 30:9-15, The derision itself. Formerly old men rose to me (Job 29:8). Now not only my juniors, who are hound to reverence me (Leviticus 19:32), but even the mean and base-born, actually deride me: opposed to "smiled upon" (Job 29:24). This goes further than even the 'mockery' of Job by relation and friends. (Job 12:4; Job 16:10; Job 16:20; Job 17:2; Job 17:6; Job 19:22). Orientals feel keenly any indignity shown by the young. Job speaks as a rich Arabian emir, proud of his descent.

Dogs - regarded with disgust in the East as unclean (1 Samuel 17:43; Proverbs 26:11). They are not allowed to enter a house, but run about wild in the open air, living on offal and chance morsels (Psalms 59:14-15). Here again, we are reminded of Jesus Christ (Psalms 22:16, "Dogs have compassioned me"). Their fathers, my coevals, were so mean and famished that I would not have associated them with (not to say, set them over) my dogs in guarding my flock.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-30.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XXX.

(1) Whose fathers I would have disdained.—Rather, whose fathers I disdained to set. The complaint is that the children of those who were so inferior to him should treat him thus.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-30.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

But now they that are younger than I have me in derision, whose fathers I would have disdained to have set with the dogs of my flock.
they that are
19:13-19; 29:8-10; 2 Kings 2:23; Isaiah 3:5
younger than I
Heb. of fewer days than I. whose.
Psalms 35:15,16; 69:12; Mark 14:65; 15:17-20; Luke 23:14,18,35,39; Acts 17:5; Titus 1:12
Reciprocal: Genesis 21:9 - mocking;  Judges 11:3 - vain men;  Nehemiah 2:19 - they;  Job 12:4 - one mocked;  Job 19:9 - stripped;  Job 19:18 - Yea;  Psalm 42:4 - When;  Psalm 59:15 - wander;  Lamentations 1:7 - remembered;  Lamentations 3:14 - GeneralLamentations 5:14 - elders;  Ezekiel 36:3 - and are;  Philemon 1:11 - unprofitable;  Hebrews 2:8 - but

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 30:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-30.html.