Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 30:10

"They abhor me and stand aloof from me, And they do not refrain from spitting at my face.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Persecution;   Spitting;   Thompson Chain Reference - Job;   Spit upon;  
Dictionaries:
Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Far;   Spit;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Saliva;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

They abhor me - What a state must civil society be in when such indignities were permitted to be offered to the aged and afflicted!

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-30.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

They abhor me - Hebrew, They regard me as abominable.

They flee far from me - Even such an impious and low born race now will have nothing to do with me. They would consider it no honor to be associated with me, but keep as far from me as possible.

And spare not to spit in my face - Margin, “withhold not spittle from.” Noyes renders this “Before my face;” and so Luther Wemyss, Umbreit, and Prof. Lee. The Hebrew may mean either to spit in the face, or to spit “in the presence” of anyone. It is quite immaterial which interpretation is adopted, since in the view of Orientals the one was considered about the same as the other. In their notions of courtesy and urbanity, he commits an insult of the same kind who spits in the presence of another which he would if he spit on him. Are they not right? Should it not be so considered every where? Yet how different their views from the more refined notions of the civilized Occidentals! In America, more than in any other land, are offences of this kind frequent and gross. Of nothing do foreigners complain of us more, or with more justice; and much as we boast of our intelligence and refinement, we should gain much if in this respect we would sit down at the feet of a Bedouin Arab, and incorporate his views into our maxims of politeness.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-30.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

THE EFFECT OF THEIR TORMENTS UPON JOB

"They abhor me, they stand aloof from me,

They spare not to spit in my face.

For he hath loosed his cord and afflicted me;

And they have cast off the bridle before me.

Upon my right hand rise the rabble;

They thrust aside my feet,

And they cast up against me their ways of destruction.

They mar my path,

They set forward my calamity,

Even men that have no helper.

As through a wide breach they come:

In the midst of the ruin, they roll themselves upon me.

Terrors are turned upon me;

They chase mine honor as the wind;

And my welfare is passed away as a cloud."

"For he hath loosed his cord, and afflicted me" (Job 30:11). The word "he" in this line is suspicious. It is not God who has been the subject of affirmations in (he previous verses, but evil men; and we find strong reasons for agreement with Driver who strongly questioned this rendition. "The text here is so uncertain and ambiguous that it is impossible to determine with confidence whether these verses refer to: (1) God's treatment of Job, or (2) to the treatment of Job by evil men."[12] Judging from the context, it appears to this writer that the word "he" here should be rendered "they" instead; because the following clause, according to the rules of Hebrew parallelism demand the plural, not the singular. Certainly the RSV is wrong in ramming the word "God" into this passage. The name of the deity is not in the text. Based upon this valid rule of interpretation, Rowley,[13] Budde, Ball, and Pope[14] properly render the line thus: "They (Job's tormentors) have loosed his cord."[15] The word `cord' here is either a bowstring or a tent cord.

Rawlinson, Peake and others make the passage say that "God has loosed Job's bowstring, and grievously afflicted him"'[16] The text does not say this; and if Job said it, it is not true; therefore, we reject the interpretation that makes Job the author of a falsehood. Satan, not God, was Job's tormentor throughout; and only in the sense of God's allowing it to happen may it honestly be said that God afflicted Job. We resist with all our strength the efforts of so many scholars to interpret the scriptures in such a manner as to put falsehoods in the mouth of the hero of this book. The Almighty himself declared that "Job has spoken that which is right concerning me (God)" (Job 42:7). That affirmation from God Himself cannot be harmonized with allegations that Job accused God of cruelty, affliction, and other crimes against Job.

Admittedly, a number of verses in this chapter are very difficult to interpret, as Van Selms explained. "A number of statements in this chapter present difficult linguistic problems ... The reader will have to trust that we have done our level best faithfully to reproduce the Hebrew text as it has been handed down to us."[17] In difficult places, the decision that various scholars make is influenced by their a priori judgments, and in some instances even bias against such things, for example, as predictive prophecy, etc. It appears in Job, that some have made an incorrect judgment to the effect that Job continually accused God of executing injustice upon him, something that Job did not do. As we have repeatedly warned: In passages where it seems Job is falsely accusing God of tormenting him, Job is, in no sense, blaming God, but speaking as does a bereaved mourner who says, "The Lord has given, and the Lord has taken away; Blessed be the name of the Lord!"

"Upon my right hand rise the rabble" (Job 30:12). "These verses (Job 30:12-14) are a metaphor of Job's troubles, which appear as a host besieging a city (Job 30:12), making escape impossible (Job 30:13), and finally pouring in to overwhelm him when the walls have been breached (Job 30:14)."[18] This is one of many beautiful metaphors found in the words of Job.

The psychology of those people who so severely attacked and afflicted Job was noted by Blair. "Not only did they make a jest of Job, they made a prey of him also, and poured their wrath upon him. They blamed him for their own horrible state of existence. Though he was innocent, they gave no regard to him. They had to blame someone; so they chose to blame Job."[19]

"Mine honor (nobility) ... and my welfare" (Job 30:15). Driver interpreted this as a reference to: "Job's princely dignity and reputation, and to his wealth and to all of the esteem related to it."[20]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-30.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

They abhor me,.... As it is no wonder they should, since his inward and most intimate friends did, Job 19:19; they abhorred him, not for any evil in him; Job was ready enough to abhor that himself, and himself for it, as he did when sensible of it, Job 42:6; but for the good that was in him, spoken or done by him; which carried in it a reproof to them they could not bear; see Amos 5:10; they abhorred him also because of his present meanness and poverty, and because of his afflictions and distresses; and particularly the diseases of his body; so Christ was abhorred by the Scribes, Pharisees and elders of the people, the three shepherds his soul loathed, and their soul abhorred him for his meanness and for his ministry: and even by the whole nation of the Jews, by the body of the people, particularly when they preferred Barabbas, a thief and a murderer, to him, Mark 15:7; see Zechariah 11:8;

they flee from me; as from some hideous monster, or infectious person, as if he had the plague on him, or some nauseous disease, the stench of which they could not bear; so Christ his antitype was used by: his people; when they saw him in his afflictions they hid their faces from him, did not care to look at him, or come nigh him, Isaiah 53:3;

and spare not to spit in my face; not in his presence only, as some think, which is too low a sense, but literally and properly in his face, when they vouchsafed to come near him; in this opprobrious way they used him, than which nothing was a greater indignity and affront; and we need not scruple to interpret it in this sense of Job, since our Lord, whose type he was in this and other things, was so treated, Isaiah 50:6.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-30.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

in my face — rather, refrain not to spit in deliberate contempt before my face. To spit at all in presence of another is thought in the East insulting, much more so when done to mark “abhorrence.” Compare the further insult to Jesus Christ (Isaiah 50:6; Matthew 26:67).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-30.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

They abhor me, they flee far from me, and spare not to spit in my face.

Spit — Not literally, for they kept far from him, but figuratively, they use all manner of reproachful expressions, even to my face. Herein, also we see a type of Christ, who was thus made a reproach of men, and despised of the people.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-30.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 30:10 They abhor me, they flee far from me, and spare not to spit in my face.

Ver. 10. They abhor me, they flee far from me] As if I were a leper or a bugbear, or that my breath were infectious; like that maid spoken of by Avicen, who, feeding upon poison, was herself healthy, yet infected others with her venomous breath. Job was wont to be honoured; now he is as much abhorred. People were used to hanging upon his lips for learned counsel, but they stand aloof, and keep at a distance. They looked upon that face of his as the face of an angel, which now, with utmost despite and detestation, they spit upon and spare not. At virtutes evertere non possunt, as Demetrius Phalereus said, when the Athenians threw down the many statues they had once erected in honour of him, But they cannot throw down my virtues and valiant acts, whereby I deserved those statues. Job was not without his cordial in this sad and sudden change of his condition. For, first, the bird in his own bosom sang sweetly still, as birds in the spring tune most melodiously when it rains most sadly. And, secondly, what if these miscreants prate against Job with malicious words, as Diotrephes did against Demetrius, 3 John 1:9-13, yet it is enough for Job or Demetrius that they have a good report of all men; that is, of all good men, who indeed are the only men (because a good name only is a name, Ecclesiastes 7:1, and a good wife only a wife, Proverbs 18:22) to be reckoned on; and of the truth itself, that is more, Job 30:12.

And spare not to spit in my face] In signum videlicet maximi contemptus et indignationis (Junius), In token of greatest contempt and indignation, as Numbers 12:14, Isaiah 50:6, Deuteronomy 25:9. The face is the table of beauty or comeliness; and when it is spit upon it is made the seat of shame. Their words were, likely, such as the English barons here said of the popes that excommunicated them, Fie on such rascal ribalds, &c., Marcidi ribauldi (Mat. Paris,). Our Lord Christ also was spit upon in like manner, that he might cleanse our faces from the filth of sin, and make them shine with his beams, 1 John 3:2.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 30:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-30.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 30:10. They abhor me, &c.— They abominate me: they hold me in the utmost abhorrence, and fear not to spit in my face. Houb. Heath reads, They hold me in abhorrence; they go out at a distance from me; nay, they refrain not from spitting in my face: Job 30:11. Because he hath stripped me of my glory, and hath afflicted me; therefore they have thrown off the bridle in my presence. See Schultens.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 30:10". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-30.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

They flee far from me, in contempt of my person, and loathing of my sores.

Spare not to spit in my face; not literally, for they kept far from him, as he now said; but figuratively, i.e. they use all manner of contemptuous and reproachful expressions and carriages towards me, not only behind my back, but even to my face.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 30:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-30.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10.Spit in my face Numbers 12:14; Deuteronomy 25:9; see also Job 17:6. Some improperly understand the grossly insulting act in this case to have been before, not into, the face. In the East, however, spitting in the presence of another is regarded as an outrage nearly as great as to spit upon him.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-30.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Face. This most people explain literally; while some, (Calmet) as Job was herein a figure of Christ, (Menochius; Matthew xxvi.; Worthington) think that the expression denotes the utmost contempt; (St. Gregory, &c.) or that the people spit upon the ground (Calmet) for fear of contracting any infection; (Haydock) and because lepers were held in the utmost abhorrence. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-30.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Even the low-life do not want to associate with Job, and they even spit upon him.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-30.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

face = presence,

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-30.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

They abhor me, they flee far from me, and spare not to spit in my face.

In my face - rather, refrain not to spit (in deliberate contempt) before my face. To spit at all in presence of another is thought in the Fast insulting, much more when done to mark 'abhorrence' Cf. the further insult to Jesus Christ (Isaiah 50:6; Matthew 26:67).

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-30.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

They abhor me, they flee far from me, and spare not to spit in my face.
abhor me
19:19; 42:6; Psalms 88:8; Zechariah 11:8
flee far
19:13,14; Psalms 88:8; Proverbs 19:7; Matthew 26:56
spare not to spit in my face
Heb. withhold not spittle from my face.
Numbers 12:14; Deuteronomy 25:9; Isaiah 50:6; Matthew 26:67; 27:30
Reciprocal: Judges 16:23 - to rejoice;  Judges 16:25 - sport;  Proverbs 14:20 - poor;  Mark 10:34 - spit;  Mark 14:65 - GeneralJohn 18:22 - struck

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 30:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-30.html.