Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 30:16

"And now my soul is poured out within me; Days of affliction have seized me.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;  
Dictionaries:
Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And now my soul is poured out upon me - So in Psalm 42:4, “I pour out my soul in me.” We say that one is dissolved in grief. The language is derived from the fact that the soul in grief seems to lose all firmness or consistence. The Arabs style a fearful person, one who has a watery heart, or whose heart melts away like water. Noyes.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 30:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-30.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

FURTHER DIMENSIONS OF JOB'S MOURNFUL CONDITION

"And now my soul is poured out within me;

Days of affliction have taken hold upon me.

In the night season my bones are pierced in me.

And the pains that gnaw me take no rest.

By great force is my garment disfigured;

It bindeth me about as the collar of my coat.

He hath cast me into the mire,

And I am become like dust and ashes.

I cry unto thee, and thou dost not answer me.

I stand up, and thou gazest at me.

Thou art turned to be cruel to me;

With the might of thy hand thou persecutest me.

Thou liftest me up to the wind, thou causest me to ride upon it.

For I know that thou wilt bring me to death,

And to the house appointed for all living.

Howbeit, doth not one stretch out his hand in his fall?

Or in his calamity therefore cry for help?"

"Beginning with this paragraph and on to the end of the chapter Job turns to the familiar burden of his complaint, his actual misery."[21]

"By God's great force is my garment disfigured" (Job 30:18). One does not need to be a scholar to know that this is a false rendition. Does it take the "great power" of Almighty God to disfigure such a trifling thing as a garment worn by a human being? "Job's garment seems a trivial effect of the mighty power of God."[22] Other translations suggested by scholars are also subject to uncertainty and question. Perhaps it is best to view the passage, as stated by Driver, to be, "Hopelessly obscure or corrupt."[23]

"He hath cast me into the mire" (Job 30:19). As this reads, we have a false charge against God, and therefore we do not accept this as the proper translation of the text. God never casts anyone into the mire. Perhaps Rowley is correct who wrote that, "The Hebrew reads. `He (or it) has cast me into the mire, and there is no indication that the subject is any different from that of Job 30:18.'[24] And what disfigured Job's garment? It was his disease, not God; and we think that it was that same disease that had cast Job into the mire.

"I cry unto thee, and thou dost not answer me ... thou art turned to be cruel to me ... thou persecutest me ... and thou dissolvest me in the storm ... I know that thou wilt bring me to death" (Job 30:20-23). The general opinion of scholars on these verses is that Job is here accusing God of doing all these terrible things to him; but we find it impossible to harmonize such opinions with God's words in Job 42, "My servant Job has spoken of me the thing that is right" (Job 42:7-8). The reader knows that it was Satan, not God, who dealt so severely with Job. And, if our translation in these verses is correct (and we remain skeptical about that), then we must read Job's words as references to what God was allowing to happen, and not as references to what God was doing against Job.

"Verse 24 is unintelligible."[25] But some liberal scholars cannot overlook a chance like that to `emend' the text and make it say something that fits their theories. For example, Pope wrote concerning this unintelligible verse, "Taken in its hostile sense, by implication, Job accuses God of assaulting him while he is helpless and imploring help."[26] This cannot possibly be correct, because God twice declared that Job had spoken the truth concerning God. God never assaulted any human being while he was praying, or at any other time.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 30:16". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-30.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And now my soul is poured out upon me,.... Either in prayer to God for help and deliverance; or rather he was dissolved as it were in floods of tears, because of his distress and anguish; or his spirits were sunk, his strength and courage failed, and his heart melted, and was poured out like water; yea, his soul was pouring out unto death, and he was, as he apprehended, near unto it; his body was so weakened and broken by diseases, that it was like a vessel full of holes, out of which the liquor runs away apace; so his life and soul were going away from him, his vital spirits were almost exhausted:

the days of affliction have taken hold upon me; afflictions seize on good men as well as others, and on them more than others; and there are certain times and seasons for them, appointed and ordered by the Lord; and there is a limited time, they are not to continue always, only for some days, for a time, and but a little time, and then they will have an end; but till that time comes, there can be no deliverance from them; being sent they come, coming they seized on Job, they laid hold on him, they "caught" him, as Mr. Broughton renders it, and held him fast, and would not let him go; nor could he get clear of them till God delivered him, who only can and does deliver out of them in his own time and way.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 30:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-30.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And now my soul is l poured out upon me; the days of affliction have taken hold upon me.

(l) My life fails me, and I am as half dead.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 30:16". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-30.html. 1599-1645.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 30:16 And now my soul is poured out upon me; the days of affliction have taken hold upon me.

Ver. 16. And now my soul is poured out upon me] Now that I am under these inward terrors, I am become strengthless, even weak as water, my soul doth melt away for grief, as in Psalms 42:4, and I am as a hollow tree, wherein there is not any heart of oak; I am utterly dispirited.

The days of affliction have taken hold upon me] And so hard hold, that I despair of ever getting loose while I am alive.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 30:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-30.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 30:16. And now my soul is poured out upon me For now my soul melteth within me. Houb. See Psalms 42:4.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 30:16". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-30.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

My soul is poured out; all the strength and powers of my soul are melted, and fainting, and dying away, through my continued and insupportable sorrows and calamities.

Upon me; or, within me, as this Hebrew particle is elsewhere used, as Psalms 42:5,6 Isa 26:9 Hosea 11:8.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 30:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-30.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

Third strophe — In his extreme distress Job cries in vain to a God who casts him into the mire and coldly stares upon him, or lifts him up upon the stormy wind that he may dissolve him in the crash of the storm, and thus make more conspicuous and startling the divine determination to destroy. 16-23. Compare Job 29:2-5.

16.Poured out upon me — We say of the heart, “it dissolves in grief,” an effect of grief recognised in other languages.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 30:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-30.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Fadeth. Hebrew, "is poured out," (Haydock) ready to take its flight, Psalm xli. 5.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 30:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-30.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"His soul can absorb no more emotional strain. His suffering has drained him of all zest for life" (Strauss p. 298). Compare with Psalm 22:14; 42:4.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 30:16". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-30.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

soul. Hebrew. nephesh. App-13.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 30:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-30.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And now my soul is poured out upon me; the days of affliction have taken hold upon me.
my soul
Psalms 22:14; 42:4; Isaiah 53:12
have taken hold
Psalms 40:12
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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 30:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-30.html.