Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 30:20

"I cry out to You for help, but You do not answer me; I stand up, and You turn Your attention against me.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Doubting;   Prayer;  
Dictionaries:
Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Cry, Crying;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I cry unto thee - I am persecuted by man, afflicted with sore disease, and apparently forsaken of God.

I stand up - Or, as some translate, "I persevere, and thou lookest upon me." Thou seest my desolate, afflicted state; but thine eye doth not affect thy heart. Thou leavest me unsupported to struggle with my adversities.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-30.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I cry unto thee, and thou dost not hear me - This was a complaint which Job often made, that he could not get the ear of God; that his prayer was not regarded, and that he could not get his cause before him; compare Job 13:3, Job 13:19 ff, and Job 27:9.

I stand up - Standing was a common posture of prayer among the ancients; see Hebrews 11:21; 1 Kings 8:14, 1 Kings 8:55; Nehemiah 9:2. The meaning is, that when Job stood up to pray, God did not regard his prayer.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-30.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 30:20

I cry unto Thee, and Thou dost not hear me.

Unanswered prayer

1. There is no state so low but a godly man may have a freedom with God in prayer. Though a poor soul be in the mire, though he be but dust and ashes, yet he hath access to the throne of grace.

2. It is our duty to pray most, and usually we pray best, when it is worst with us; when we are nigh the mire and dust, prayer is not only most seasonable, but most pure.

3. Affliction provokes a soul to pray to the utmost, to pray not only in sincerity, but with fervency, not only to pray with faith, but with a holy passion, or passionately.

4. When prayer is sent out with a cry to God in affliction, it is a wonder if it be not presently heard.

5. Not to be heard in a day of trouble and affliction is more troublesome to a gracious heart than all his afflictions. Job thought he was not heard, because he had not present deliverance; and in that sense, indeed, he was not heard. And thus many of the saints may pray and not be heard; that is, they may pray, and not have present deliverance. How may we know that we are heard at any time?

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 30:20". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-30.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I cry unto thee, and thou dost not hear me,.... Which added greatly to his affliction, that though he cried to the Lord for help and deliverance, yet he turned a deaf ear to him; and though he heard him, as undoubtedly he did, he did not answer him immediately; at least not in the way in which he desired and expected he would: crying is expressive of prayer, and supposes distress, and denotes vehemence of spirit:

I stand up; in prayer, standing being a prayer gesture, as many observe from Jeremiah 15:1; See Gill on Matthew 6:5; or he persisted in it, he continued praying, was incessant in it, and yet could obtain no answer; or this signifies silence, as someF6Jarchi, Ben Gersom, and Bar Tzemach. interpret it; he cried, and then ceased, waiting for an answer; but whether he prayed, or whether he was silent, it was the same thing:

and thou regardest me not; the word "not" is not in this clause, but is repeated from the preceding, as it is by Ben Gersom and others; but some read it without it, and give the sense either thus, thou considerest me whether it is fit to receive my prayer or not, so Sephorno; or to renew my strokes, to add new afflictions to me, as Jarchi and Bar Tzemach; or thou lookest upon me as one pleased with the sight of me in such a miserable condition, so far from helping me; wherefore it follows.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-30.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

stand up — the reverential attitude of a suppliant before a king (1 Kings 8:14; Luke 18:11-13).

not — supplied from the first clause. But the intervening affirmative “stand” makes this ellipsis unlikely. Rather, as in Job 16:9 (not only dost thou refuse aid to me “standing” as a suppliant, but), thou dost regard me with a frown: eye me sternly.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-30.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I cry unto thee, and thou dost not hear me: I stand up, and thou regardest me not.

I stand — I pray importunately and continually.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-30.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 30:20 I cry unto thee, and thou dost not hear me: I stand up, and thou regardest me [not].

Ver. 20. I cry unto thee, and thou dost not hear me] This was a sore trial, that God should cast him into straits, and there leave him. His enemies indeed he usually dealeth so by, Ezekiel 22:20; Ezekiel 29:5, but not by his servants, Hebrews 13:5. Or if he do leave them, yet he will not forsake them. The mother leaves her child sometimes, but when he setteth up his note and crieth lustily, she hasteneth to help him. So doth God: but now Job cried unto him, and was not heard or answered, to his thinking at least, and that was a great cut to him, as Psalms 22:2.

I stand up] sc. To make supplication to my judge, as Haman stood up to make request for his life, Esther 7:7, as the publican stood and prayed, Luke 18:13, and as Moses and Samuel are supposed to stand before God in prayer for their people, Jeremiah 15:1. Hence that proverb among the Jews, Absque stationibus, non staret mundus, Did not the saints stand in prayer, the world could not stand.

And thou regardest me not] This was but a mistake in Job, for the eyes of the Lord are upon the righteous, and his ears are open to their prayers. Only God answereth our prayer, non secundum voluntatem, tamen ad utilitatem. Not always or as soon as we would, but doth that which is better for us, and takes it ill to be misconstrued, as he was by Job; witness the next words, bloody words indeed, and not far from blasphemy. Accusat ergo Iob Dominum mendacii (Brent.). Contumeliosus videri potest (Merl.).

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 30:20". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-30.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thou dost not hear me, to wit, so as to answer or help me.

I stand up, or, I stand, to wit, before thee, i.e. I pray, as this phrase signifies, Jeremiah 15:1 18:20, this being a gesture of prayer, Matthew 6:5. And so the same thing is here repeated in other words, after the manner. Or, I persist or persevere in praying; I pray importunately and continually, as thou requirest.

Thou regardest me not; so the particle not is supplied out of the former clause. Or without the negation, thou knowest or observest me, and all my griefs and cries, and yet dost not pity nor help me, but rather takest pleasure in the contemplation of my calamities, as the following words imply. Or it may be taken interrogatively, Dost thou regard me? i.e. thou dost not.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 30:20". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-30.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

20.Hear — Rather, answer. Regardest me (omit not) — Job takes the reverential attitude of a suppliant, and God looks upon him calmly and pitilessly.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-30.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Not is supplied by Protestants in the second part of the verse from the first; (Haydock) as this construction is not unusual in the Hebrew. Septuagint, "they have stood up, and have considered me," (Calmet) to procure my entire ruin. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-30.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"I cry out to You for help": Added to both his social rejection and physical pain, Job feels that God had abandoned him. He had cried to God for help, but God had ignored his pleas, Job had even "stood up" so he could grab God"s attention, but God had (seemingly) turned His back. "His effort to get God"s attention by standing up (meaning either in court or in a persistent attitude) was also useless" (Zuck p. 132).

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-30.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

hear = answer.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-30.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(20) Thou regardest me not.—The Authorised Version understands that the negative of the first clause must be supplied in the second, as is the case in Psalms 9:18 : “The needy shall not always be forgotten; the expectation of the poor shall not perish for ever.” Others understand it, “I stand up (i.e., to pray) in the attitude of prayer, and Thou lookest at me,” i.e., and doest no more with mute indifference.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-30.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I cry unto thee, and thou dost not hear me: I stand up, and thou regardest me not.
I cry
19:7; 27:9; Psalms 22:2; 80:4,5; Lamentations 3:8,44; Matthew 15:23
Reciprocal: Job 35:13 - regard

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 30:20". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-30.html.