Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 30:31

"Therefore my harp is turned to mourning, And my flute to the sound of those who weep.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Harp;   Music;   Thompson Chain Reference - Instruments, Chosen;   Music;   Musical Instruments;   Organs;   Tears;  
Dictionaries:
Easton Bible Dictionary - Music, Instrumental;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Harp;   Organ;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Jackal;   Job, the Book of;   Organ;   Wisdom and Wise Men;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Pipe ;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Organ;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Music;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Harp and Lyre;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

My harp also is turned to mourning - Instead of the harp, my only music is my own plaintive cries.

And my organ - What the עגב uggab was, we know not; it was most probably some sort of pipe or wind instrument. His harp, כנור kinnor, and his pipe, עגב uggab, were equally mute, or only used for mournful ditties.

This chapter is full of the most painful and pathetic sorrow; but nevertheless tempered with a calmness and humiliation of spirit, which did not appear in Job's lamentations previously to the time in which he had that remarkable revelation mentioned in the nineteenth chapter. { Job 19:25;} After he was assured that his Redeemer was the living God, he submitted to his dispensations, kissed the rod, and mourned not without hope, though in deep distress, occasioned by his unremitting sufferings. If the groaning of Job was great, his stroke was certainly heavy.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-30.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

My harp also is turned to mourning - What formerly gave cheerful sounds, now gives only notes of plaintiveness and lamentation. The harp was probably an instrument originally designed to give sounds of joy. For a description of it, see the notes at Isaiah 5:12.

And my organ - The form of what is here called the organ, is not certainly known. The word עגב ‛ûgâb is doubtless from עגב ‛âgab “to breathe, to blow”; and most probably the instrument hero intended was the pipe. For a description of it, see the notes at Isaiah 5:12. This instrument, also, was played, as would appear, on joyous occasions, but Job now says that it was turned to grief. All that had been joyous with him had fled. His honor was taken away; his friends were gone; they who had treated him with reverence now stood at a distance, or treated him with contempt; his health was departed, and his former appearance, indicating a station of affluence, was changed for the dark complexion produced by disease, and the instruments of joyousness now gave forth only notes of sorrow.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-30.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

My harp also is turned to mourning,.... Which he used, as David, either in religious worship, expressing praise to God thereby, or for his recreation in an innocent way; but now it was laid aside, and, instead of it, nothing was heard from him, or in his house, but the voice of mourning:

and my organ into the voice of them that weep; another instrument of music, which had its name from the pleasantness of its sound, and was of early use, being first invented by Jubal, Genesis 4:21; but not that we now so call, which is of late invention: those instruments which Job might have and use, both in a civil and in a religious way, were now, through afflictions, become useless to him, and neglected by him; or these expressions in general may signify, that, instead of mirth and joy he was wont to have, there were nothing now to be heard but lamentation and woe; see Lamentations 5:15.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-30.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

organ — rather, “pipe” (Job 21:12). “My joy is turned into the voice of weeping” (Lamentations 5:15). These instruments are properly appropriated to joy (Isaiah 30:29, Isaiah 30:32), which makes their use now in sorrow the sadder by contrast.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-30.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 30:31 My harp also is [turned] to mourning, and my organ into the voice of them that weep.

Ver. 31. My harp also is turned to mourning] All the days of the afflicted are evil, Proverbs 15:15, his harps are hanged up, his lute no longer fit but for melancholy airs; his song nothing but lachrymae, doleful ditties; his organs, all those instruments that were wont to divert him, are condemned either to sigh or to be silent. Intempestiva est in luctu Musica /RAPC Sir 22:6, ου ναβλα κωκυτοισιν ου λυρα φιλα (Sophocl.). Gillimer, overcome and besieged by Belisarius, sent to request of him three things: 1. A loaf, to ease his hunger. 2. A harp, to ease his grief. 3. A sponge, to dry up his tears. Such mournful music was Job’s, if any at all.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 30:31". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-30.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

MY soul, behold in the sufferings of Job, what is, and deservedly ought to be, the lot of human nature. Born in sin, and therefore born to sorrow. And shall a living man complain, a man for the punishment of his sins? Job stands forth, in this instance, a living monument of what our nature, universally speaking, is exposed to. And but for the interposition of grace, in the mercy and love of GOD our FATHER, in giving his dear Son, and the Son of GOD in coming, and the HOLY SPIRIT in bringing poor sinners acquainted with this rich salvation, all the temporal distresses of Job, aggravated by everlasting sorrows to have followed, would have been our portion forever. Oh! what shall we render to GOD for his mercies! Thanks, thanks be unto GOD for his unspeakable gift!

But my soul, while contemplating the sorrows of Job, and the gracious interposition of heaven to soften and remove them, wilt thou not again and again look at JESUS while reading Job's misery, and, in so lively a type of thy suffering Redeemer, feel all thy tender and affectionate powers going forth in love, and praise, and attachment, and obedience to thy blessed and adored Saviour? Did JESUS, in the days of his flesh, endure the contradiction of sinners against himself, that his people might not be weary, and faint in mind? Oh! thou LAMB of GOD! how didst thou, in thy debased and low estate, submit to all indignities, griefs, sorrows, wounds, bruises! Who shall describe the dreadful pangs, and agonies like those of a travailing woman when bringing forth, in the garden and on the cross, the delivery of thy people from everlasting slavery and eternal death. Oh, precious GOD! thou shalt see the travail of thy soul, for so the FATHER promised, and be satisfied. Thou shalt justify many. The dew of thy birth shall be as the womb of the morning. And now, blessed Redeemer, having by thy death delivered thy redeemed from death, and by rising to life again having begotten them to everlasting life: now thou rememberest no more the anguish of thy travailing pains in redemption work, for joy that thy children are born into the world of grace, and shall hereafter be with thee in glory. Amen.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-30.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Either,

1. I have now nothing but bitter lamentations instead of my former expressions of joy. Or,

2. Those very things which formerly were occasions and instruments of my delight, do now renew and aggravate my sorrows.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 30:31". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-30.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

31.Harp’ to mourning — See note, Job 21:12. Among the Hindus, when a person is in trouble, his instrument is also considered to be in trouble, (Roberts.)

Thus closes the second part of the soliloquy, (monologue,) Job’s last sorrowful lament. “What a delicate touch of the poet is it that he makes this lament die away so melodiously! One hears the prolonged vibration of its elegiac strains. The festive and joyous music is hushed; the only tones are tones of sadness and lament, mesto flebile.” — Delitzsch.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-30.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Weep. I have exchanged my sons of joy for mourning. (Menochius)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-30.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"The glad, happy sounds are no more" (Strauss p. 301). In addition, music that Job had enjoyed in the past, had lost all its pleasure, the verse may even suggest that Job played himself, but no longer found enjoyment in any of this.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-30.html. 1999-2014.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

My harp also is turned to mourning, and my organ into the voice of them that weep.

Organ - rather, pipe (Job 21:12): "My joy is turned into the voice of weeping" (Lamentations 5:15). My harp and pipe now emit only sounds of sorrow. These instruments are properly appropriated to joy (Isaiah 30:29; Isaiah 30:32), which makes their use now in sorrow the sadder by contrast.

Remarks:

(1) Derision and disdain (Job 30:1-10), wound a high-spirited and sensitive nature more than the most acute bodily pain. Yet, if we are conscious of not having deserved reproach, we ought not to let ourselves be cast down by the sneers, revilings, and hatred of ungodly men. Rather let us "consider Him who endured such contradiction of sinners against Himself" (Hebrews 12:13); and "who, when He was reviled, reviled not again" (1 Peter 2:23).

(2) How little reason have men to be ambitious of the praises or proud of the honours which the multitude bestow, seeing that the breath of man's favour is as fickle as the wind. The same rabble that cringe and fawn upon you today will, if adversity assail you, turn against, deride, and insult you to-morrow; just as the mob that cried 'Hosanna to Jesus, the Son of David' on the previous Sunday, cried "Away with Him, crucify Him," on the following Friday.

(3) When the spirit is embittered by bodily pains and afflictions arising from our fellow-men, we ought especially to be on our guard against being betrayed, as Job was, into entertaining hard thoughts of God (Job 30:11-22). Still, great allowance is to be made for our brother-believers in such a trying position, where their mind is confused, and the soul is hurried away by the violence of conflicting emotions. Instead of harshly condemning, we ought gently to soothe, sympathize, and try to laid them to view things in their true light. The remembrance of their past sympathy with those in trouble of mind, body, or estate (Job 30:25), and the unexpected suddenness of their reverses of fortune (Job 30:26), are strong claims on our charity and tenderness in dealing with them.

(4) The feature in one's trials which causes most pain to the child of God is, that when he cries, his heavenly Father seems not to heed him (Job 30:20). Let such a one wait patiently, and, like Job, pray on believingly, confident that, if not in this life, yet beyond the grave, God will for ever cease to stretch out His hand to afflict those who now cry to Him in their destruction (Job 30:24).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-30.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(31) My harp also is turned to mourning.—Or, Therefore is my harp turned to mourning, and my pipe into the voice of them that weep. The musical instruments here named, like those of Genesis 4:21, are respectively the stringed and wind instruments.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-30.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

My harp also is turned to mourning, and my organ into the voice of them that weep.
Psalms 137:1-4; Ecclesiastes 3:4; Isaiah 21:4; 22:12; 24:7-9; Lamentations 5:15; Daniel 6:18 Reciprocal: Psalm 150:4 - organs;  Lamentations 5:14 - the young;  James 4:9 - let

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 30:31". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-30.html.