Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 36:2

"Wait for me a little, and I will show you That there is yet more to be said in God's behalf.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Dictionaries:
Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elihu;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Behalf;   Job, Book of;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Minden, Judah (Lö;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

That I have yet to speak on God's behalf - I have other proofs to allege in behalf of God's justice and providence.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 36:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-36.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Suffer me a little - Even beyond the regular order of speaking; or, allow me to go on though I have fully occupied my place in the “number” of speeches. Jarchi remarks that this verse is “Chaldaic,” and it is worthy of observation that the principal words in it are not those ordinarily used in Hebrew to express the same thought, but are such as occur in the Chaldee. The word rendered “suffer” (כתר kâthar ) has here a signification which occurs only an Syriac and Chaldee. It properly means in Hebrew: to “surround,” in a hostile sense; Judges 20:43; Psalm 22:12; then in the Hiphil to crown oneself. In Syriac and Chaldee, it means “to wait” - perhaps from the idea of going round and round - and this is the meaning here. He wished them not to remit their attention, but to have patience with what he would yet say.

And I will show thee that - Margin, “there are yet words for God.” The Hebrew is, “And I will show you that there are yet words for God;” that is, that there were yet many. considerations which could be urged in vindication of his government. The idea of Elihu is not so much that “he” had much to say, as that in fact there was much that “could be” said for him. He regarded his character and government as having been attacked, and he believed that there were ample considerations which could be urged in its defense. The word which is here rendered “I will show thee” (אחוך 'achâvekā ), is also Chaldee in its signification. It is from חוה châvâh (Chaldee) not used in the Qal, but it occurs in other forms in the Chaldee portion of the Scriptures; see Daniel 2:11, Daniel 2:16, Daniel 2:24, Daniel 2:27. The use of these Chaldee words is somewhat remarkable, and perhaps may throw some light on the question about the time and place of the composition of the book.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 36:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-36.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Suffer me a little,.... Bear with me a little longer, and allow me to say a few words more. I have but little more to say, and it will take but a little time to say it in; thus, proposing brevity, he hoped to be heard with patience, since he should not long trespass upon it. The word used has the signification of a crown; but not to be understood in the sense of surrounding, as a crown surrounds the head, as some, who interpret it, stand about me, surround me, in order to hear; for this cannot with propriety be said to a single person; but rather in the sense of doing honour, as Aben Ezra; and so the meaning may be, do me the honour of giving; me thy presence a little longer, and hearing me out patiently;

and I will show thee: make things clear, manifest, and plain to thee: clearness of expression, with brevity, recommends a discourse. Something may be here supplied; for a greater stop is here to be made than in our version, as either "my opinion", as in Job 32:10; his sentiment concerning God and his righteousness in his dealings with the sons of men; or "truth", as Ben Gersom; truth in general, plain naked truth, without any colouring, just as it is, cordially, sincerely, in love, and by clear manifestations of it; and particularly the truth of the righteousness of God in all his ways and works. He proposed to make it clear to him that God did all things well and right, and to lay before him in the plainest manner what were the ends God had in view in dealing thus with Job, and what was his duty to do in his present circumstances;

that I have yet to speak in God's behalf: or "for I have yet to speak"F7כי "quia", Pagninus, Montanus; "nam", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator. , &c. Elihu had said much for God already, in vindication of his sovereignty, purity, holiness, and justice, and he had yet more to say; out of the abundance of his heart his mouth spake for God; he set out with this, that he was full of matter, and wanted to vent himself, that he might be eased, Job 32:18; and he had vented much, but he had yet more to deliver; and since it was not for himself, in his own behalf, nor of any other but God, he hoped he should be heard: it may be rendered, "for yet God has words"F8עוד לאלוה מלים "adhue Deo sermones", Montanus; "habit enim Deus adhue quod dicet", Castalio; so some in Michaelis. , to put into my mouth, and speak by me; signifying, that he had spoken by him already, and had still more to say by him; and since it was not so much he that spoke, as God that spoke in him and by him, it might be expected he would be heard.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 36:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-36.html. 1999.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 36:2 Suffer me a little, and I will shew thee that [I have] yet to speak on God’s behalf.

Ver. 2. Suffer me a little, and I will show thee] He promiseth brevity and thereby wooeth attention: brevity and perspicuity are two great graces of speech, and do very much win upon intelligent hearers, who love to hear much in few, and cannot away with tedious prolixities. When a great trifler had made an empty discourse in the presence of Aristotle, and then cried him mercy for troubling him so long: You have not troubled me at all, said he, for I scarce hearkened to any one word you said all this while.

That I have yet to speak on God’s behalf] Heb. That there are yet words for God. His zeal for God’s glory drew from him this following speech, wherein insignis est Elihu et magnificus. Elihu excelleth himself, and appeareth to be no worse an orator than was M. Crassus among the Romans, who had this commendation given him, Quod cum aliquid accuratius dixisset, semper fere contigit ut nunquam dixisse melius putaretur, That whenever he spoke it was judged to be the very best that ever he spake. (Cir. de Orat. 1. 1).

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 36:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-36.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Job 36:2

I. The wisdom put into the mouth of Elihu when the three friends had failed reminds us of what we are taught elsewhere in the Bible: that there are times when traditional authority must give way to truth, when he who is young may instruct those who are aged, when out of the mouths of babes and sucklings God has ordained that very strength which the world most needs. Each generation must learn not only from that which has gone before, but from that which is coming after, it.

II. The book of Job impresses upon us that there are problems beyond the power of man to exhaust, and that in the certainty of that uncertainty it is our privilege to rest. The human mind, it may be well said, may repose as calmly before a confessed and incontrovertible difficulty as before a confessed and discovered truth.

III. The third lesson is found in Job's words "I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes." He was called from dwelling on himself and his own virtue to feel that he was in the presence of One to whom all earthly intelligence and wisdom seem insignificant. Calamities bring us into the presence of Him before whom we must feel a sense of sin and infirmity. The self-abasement of Job is a necessary element of that perfect and upright character of which he is the type.

IV. This sense of the vastness of the universe, of the imperfection of our own knowledge, may help us to understand, not indeed the origin of evil and suffering, but something of its possible uses and purposes. Distrust of ourselves, self-abasement before the Judge of all mankind, charity for others—these are the gifts which often are the best results of distress, of doubt, and of difficulty.

A. P. Stanley, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xiv., p. 289 (see also Addresses and Sermons in America, p. 133).


References: Job 36:2.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxiv., No. 1403. Job 36:5.—Ibid., vol. xxiii., No. 1380; Ibid., Evening by Evening, p. 12.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Job 36:2". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/job-36.html.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Suffer me a little; give me thy patient attention but a little longer; and I

will show thee that I have not said all that can be said to justify God’s proceedings against thee.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 36:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-36.html. 1685.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"That there is yet more to be said in God"s behalf": Elihu has this consuming desire to defend God against Job"s accusations concerning God"s justice. Are we earnest in wanting to speak in God"s behalf?

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 36:2". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-36.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

GOD"S. Hebrew Eloah. App-4.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 36:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-36.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Suffer me a little, and I will shew thee that I have yet to speak on God's behalf.
Suffer
21:3; 33:31-33; Hebrews 13:22
I have yet to speak, etc
Heb. there are yet words for God.
13:7,8; 33:6; Exodus 4:16; Jeremiah 15:19; Ezekiel 2:7; 2 Corinthians 5:20
Reciprocal: Job 15:17 - hear me

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 36:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-36.html.