Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 36:29

"Can anyone understand the spreading of the clouds, The thundering of His pavilion?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Ignorance;   Meteorology and Celestial Phenomena;   The Topic Concordance - God;   Judges;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Clouds;  
Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Cloud, Cloud of the Lord;   Testimony;   Holman Bible Dictionary - God;   Job, the Book of;   Pavilion;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Cloud;   Pavilion;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elihu;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Noise;   Pavilion;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Cloud;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Can any understand the spreadings of the clouds - Though the vapor appear to be fortuitously raised, and subject, when suspended in the atmosphere, to innumerable accidents, to different winds and currents which might drive it all to the sandy deserts, or direct its course so that it should fall again into the great deep from which it has been exhaled, without watering and refreshing the earth; yet so does the good and wise providence of God manage this matter, that every part of the arable terrene surface receives an ample supply; and in every place, where requisite, it may be truly said that "The rain cometh down, and the snow from heaven, and water the earth, and cause it to bring forth and bud, that it may minister seed to the sower, and bread to the eater." In Egypt, where there is little or no rain, the earth is watered by the annual inundation of the Nile; there, because this system of evaporation is not necessary, it does not exist. Who can account for this economy? How are these clouds so judiciously and effectually spread through the atmosphere, so as to supply the wants of the earth, of men, and of cattle? I ask, with Elihu, "Who can understand the spreadings of these clouds?" And I should like to see that volunteer in the solution of paradoxes who would step forward and say, I am the man.

The noise of his tabernacle? - By the tabernacle we may understand the whole firmament or atmospheric expansion; the place where the Almighty seems more particularly to dwell; whence he sends forth the rain of his strength, and the thunder of his power. The noise must refer to the blowing of winds and tempests. or to the claps, peals, and rattling of thunder, by means of the electric fluid.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-36.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Also, can any understand the spreadings of the clouds? - The out spreading - the manner in which they expand themselves over us. The idea is, that the manner in which the clouds seem to “spread out,” or unfold themselves on the sky, could not be explained, and was a striking proof of the wisdom and power of God. In the early periods of the world, it could not be expected that the causes of these phenomena would be known. Now that the causes “are” better known, however, they do not less indicate the wisdom and power of God, nor are these facts less fitted to excite our wonder. The simple and beautiful laws by which the clouds are suspended; by which they roll in the sky; by which they spread themselves out - as in a rising tempest, and by which they seem to unfold themselves over the heavens, should increase, rather than diminish, our conceptions of the wisdom and power of the Most High.

Or, the noise of his tabernacle - Referring, doubtless, to thunder. The clouds are represented as a tent or pavilion spread out for the dwelling of God (compare the notes at Isaiah 40:22), and the idea here is, that the noise made in a thunder-storm is in the unique dwelling of God. Herder well expresses it, “The fearful thunderings in his tent,” compare Psalm 18:11 -

He made darkness his secret place,

His pavilion round about him were dark waters and thick clouds of the skies.

The sense here is, who can understand and explain the cause of thunder? The object of Elihu in this is, to show how great and incomprehensible is God, and nature furnishes few more impressive illustrations of this than the crash of thunder.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-36.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Also can any understand the spreadings of the clouds,.... Or "of a cloud"F12עב "nubis", Montanus, Tigurine version, Mercerus, Piscator, Schultens. , a thick cloud, a single one; which sometimes at the beginning is very small, about the size of a man's hand, 1 Kings 18:44; and which in a little time spreads all over the heavens, and covers them with black clouds and darkness; none can understand, describe, and tell by what means so small a cloud at first appearance is spread to such a prodigious extent; and which is done partly for the use of God himself, to be a pavilion or tent around him, Psalm 18:11; and partly for the use of men, either to let down ram on the several parts of the world, or to be a sort of an umbrella to men, to shelter them from scorching heat; nor can any understand how the clouds, stretched out to such a compass, are poised and balanced in the air, so as to retain their position as long as it is the pleasure of God; see Job 37:16. Ben Gersom, who is followed by othersF13מפרשי "differentias", Pagninus; "varietates", Vatablus. , interprets this of the differences of the clouds, which are unaccountable, as to the form and colour of them being curious, and the matter which they contain or what issues from them; out of some rain, others hail, others snow and sleet, others wind, others thunder and lightning; and yet all arise from the same, even from vapours exhaled from the earth and sea; some become moist and cold, others hot and dry. As clouds are emblems of Gospel ministers, Isaiah 5:6; this may lead us to observe the different gifts of grace bestowed on them, and the different uses they are of; some are Boanergeses, sons of thunder, Mark 3:17; others Barnabases, sons of consolation, Acts 4:36; and the extent of the Gospel ministry all over the world, which first began as a small cloud over the land of Judea, and then was spread throughout the Gentile world;

or the noise of his tabernacle; the tabernacle of God, which are the clouds, which are laid as the flooring of his palace, and are drawn about him as a tent or pavilion, Psalm 104:3, where he sits invisible, and from whence, as a general of an army, he issues out his orders, and sends forth his artillery, rain, hail, snow, thunder, and lightning, and stormy wind fulfilling his word; the noise hereof is either the noise of the waters in the clouds, the sound of an abundance of rain, 1 Kings 18:41; or of the blustering winds, by which the clouds are moved and portend rain; or of the thunder that bursts out of them with a vehement noise, and which is usually followed with rain; and the thunder of his power who can understand? Job 26:14. This may be an emblem of the voice of God in his Gospel out of his tabernacle, the church, which the natural man understands not; or the voice of God in his providences, in which he speaks to men once and twice, and they perceive it not.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-36.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Also can [any] understand the spreadings of the clouds, [or] the noise of his t tabernacle?

(t) Meaning, of the clouds, which he calls the tabernacle of God.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-36.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

(Job 37:5). God‘s marvels in thunder and lightnings.

spreadings, etc. — the canopy of thick clouds, which covers the heavens in a storm (Psalm 105:39).

the noise — “crashing”; namely, thunder.

of his tabernacle — God being poetically said to have His pavilion amid dark clouds (Psalm 18:11; Isaiah 40:22).

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-36.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Also can any understand the spreadings of the clouds, or the noise of his tabernacle?

Understand — Whence it comes to pass, that a small cloud, no bigger than a man's hand, suddenly spreads over the whole heavens: how the clouds come to be suddenly gathered, and so condensed as to bring forth thunder and lightning.

Noise — The thunder produced in the clouds, which are often called God's tent or tabernacle.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-36.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 36:29 Also can [any] understand the spreadings of the clouds, [or] the noise of his tabernacle?

Ver. 29. Also can any understand the spreading of the clouds] That is, the skill that God showeth in spreading forth the clouds to that large extent, and muffling the whole heavens with them, so that nature finds herself buried in darkness? Some render it, the divisions or differences of the clouds; illic enim fiunt miracula magna (Vatab.); for some clouds are empty, and answer not expectation (worthless and vain boasters are compared to such, Proverbs 25:14;, 1:12), some yield rain and drop fatness. Some, again, send forth hail, snow, frost, storm, thunder, lightnings, &c. (R. Levi). These are wonders in nature, far beyond human apprehension. The clouds God maketh one while as some airy seas, to hold water; another while as some airy furnaces, whence he scattereth the sudden fires into all parts of the earth, astonishing the world with the fearful noise of that eruption. Out of the midst of water he fetcheth fire, and hard stones out of the midst of thin vapours. Haec sunt sane admiranda et tremenda, saith Mercer. These are wonderful things, and no less dreadful. Is it not strange that of one and the same equal matter, viz. the vapours exhaled from the earth or water, various and different meteors should he engendered?

Or the noise of his tabernacle?] i.e. The swinging showers, or rustling winds, or rattling thunder claps, one in the neck of another, out of the clouds, called here God’s tabernacle; in quo velut abditus, tot rerum miracula creat, wherein he sits in secret and unseen, creating many strange meteors to send down upon the earth; whereof the profoundest philosopher of them all can give no certain and undoubted reason.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 36:29". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-36.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 36:29. Also, can any understand, &c.— How much more when he manifesteth the burstings of the clouds; the crash of the thunder of his pavilion! Job 36:30. See his lightning flasheth around him! he turneth up the bottom of the sea: Job 36:31. Verily by them he executeth judgment on the nations, &c.; Job 36:32. He covereth the sun as it were with his hands, and commandeth it, &c.; Job 36:33. His thunder maketh proclamation before him. Wrath is treasured up against iniquity. This is one of the noblest images in the whole book, and has been finely illustrated by Schultens; to whom we refer, and Heath.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, As the general silence seemed to give approbation to what was said, Elihu, after a short pause, resumes his discourse, with an apology for trespassing a little longer on their patience; for what he had now to say would be short, yet important. He was speaking in God's behalf, therefore might claim attention. It was no common subject that he treated; but his knowledge was fetched from afar, the result of long researches, and concerning the deep things of God. His design was, to vindicate the ways of God to man, and ascribe righteousness to his Maker in all the dispensations of his providence. And in doing this he resolved to use the greatest impartiality and sincerity, speaking the truth in love; and he presumed that he was so thoroughly acquainted with his subject, and his intention was so upright, that they would acknowledge their regard justly due to his disquisition. Note; (1.) They who speak for God in simplicity, will, by the importance of their discourse, engage attention. (2.) A faithful soul is jealous of God's honour, and rises up to vindicate his dispensations from the foolish and sinful aspersions of those murmurers and complainers who charge God foolishly. (3.) Truth, and plainness of speech, especially become those who profess themselves teachers of the good ways of God.

2nd, Elihu, in the behalf of God, proceeds, as he proposed, to vindicate God's righteous government.

1. The meanest of his subjects are not despised by him. He is mighty to redress their grievances, and wise in all his dispensations towards them. Note; if God despiseth not any, surely much less ought we to despise a fellow-creature!

2. He ministers impartial justice. The greatest, if wicked, feel his vengeance; cut off even here oftentimes by his righteous judgment; or, if their lives be prolonged, they are only reserved for the wrath to come: while the cause of the poor that were wronged, God espouses; and his eyes are upon them for good; they are exalted to honour in this world, or, what is infinitely better, they are established in his grace and love. Note; (1.) The day is near, when the oppressor and the oppressed will meet at the righteous bar of God. (2.) However low God's faithful people may be reduced, there is a kingdom prepared for them.

3. If God afflicts his believing people, it is purely with a design to do them good; to humble them under the views of past iniquities, and to open their ears to that instruction, to which, except under the rod, they would have been inattentive; and to shew them the path of duty, as the sure way of deliverance from the cords of affliction. Note; (1.) A sense of God's purpose in our chastisements should make us not only resigned but thankful. (2.) Whatever brings us to humbler views of ourselves, and more unreserved dependance on God, is to be reckoned among our chief mercies. Afflictions only answer their design, when the ear and the heart are open to discipline; else they but harden instead of humbling. (3.) It is a blessed fruit of afflictions, when we leave the dross of sin in the furnace, and come forth purified as silver from the fire.

4. When the end of the correction is answered, the rod will not only be removed, but the blessedness of it appear. If they obey and serve him, in consequence of his gracious chastisement, then they shall spend their days in prosperity and their years in pleasures; for godliness hath the promise of the life which now is, and ever brings that best portion, contentment; but especially in their souls they shall prosper, and taste the more substantial pleasures of religion.

5. Where hypocrites suffer, far different is the issue. As they obey not the divine admonitions, but by their impatient and unhumbled spirit heap up wrath, and, instead of crying to God in their distress, are stupid and hardened under it; destruction awaits them; they shall perish under the judgment, and, what is far worse, shall die impenitent. In youth they shall be cut off, and their portion in eternity be appointed them among the unclean, whose worm dieth not, and their fire is not quenched. Note; (1.) Hypocrites in heart will be detected: however fair a shew they make in the flesh, there is one that seeth and judgeth. (2.) Many now proudly despise the open sinner, the profane and unclean, and say to them, "Stand by thyself," I am more holy than you, who yet shall have their portion with them in the burning lake.

3rdly, Elihu applies what he had said, to Job's case.

1. Had he been humbled, God would have removed the affliction; but his conduct under it continued the scourge upon him. It is God's constant method of procedure, to deliver the poor in spirit, to support, comfort, and strengthen him, and, when it is fit, to open a door of escape for him. Meantime, he conveys his instructive lessons, and whispers his kind consolations to the soul, amidst all its sorrows; and this Job would, ere now, have experienced, had he been patiently submissive; his path had not been then, as now, straitened, or his wants so distressing; he would have been freed from his troubles, and his table crowned with plenty: but since, by a behaviour like that of wicked men, and pleas which gave them countenance in their iniquities, he had offended, therefore in just judgment his corrections were continued, till his heart should be brought to bow in silent humiliation, and to give God his due glory in the acknowledgment of his righteousness. Note; (1.) When chastisements have answered their end, they will assuredly be removed; for God doth not willingly afflict the children of men. (2.) They who plead the cause of the wicked, must not wonder if they suffer with them.

2. He warns him of the danger of persevering in obstinate self-vindication. There was danger lest God, in wrath, should resent his injurious aspersions on his government; and if he should rise up to avenge his own quarrel, woe to the man against whom he lifts up the sword. No ransom can redeem him, no might rescue him, no darkness conceal him; no, not even the grave, which Job had so impatiently desired. The darkness hath no covering before God; and in death, their appointed place, the wrath of God pursues the sinners.

3. He cautions him to regard iniquity no longer, to persevere no longer in his charges against God, or so impatiently to desire death, to be rid of his afflictions, rather than humbly resigned to wait God's leisure and time for his deliverance. Note; The greatest sufferings are preferable to the least sins.

4. He bids him observe God's power, wisdom, and righteousness, to engage his unreserved submission to his will. He exalteth by his power, himself the source of all power, and, according to his own will, exalting whom he pleases. None teaches like him, so wise or able to direct: he needs no adviser; his ways, word, and providences, are all perfect in wisdom; and it were as false as foolish to charge him with iniquity, whose bosom is the seat of justice; and whose glorious prerogative it is, from the essential rectitude of his nature, that he can do no wrong. Note; The more we know of God, the more shall we be silenced and confounded before him, nor dare compare our wisdom, power, and righteousness with his, or complain of any thing that he appoints, which must be always wise as righteous.

4thly, From this view of the glorious works of God, his unsearchable perfections, and wonders in the administration of the kingdom of providence, Elihu would affect Job with humble thoughts of himself, and higher apprehensions of God and his ways.

1. He is worthy to be magnified for the works that he hath wrought, visible to every eye: the heavens above, the earth around us, proclaim the glory of the Creator; and since, in them, his universal goodness as well as greatness appears, we may assuredly conclude, that in his works of providence, respecting us in particular, he deserves equally to be magnified and adored.

2. Though we see and know a part of his excellence, yet his perfections are unsearchable, and the mysteries of his works past finding out. If then we cannot comprehend his surpassing greatness, it were a folly to arraign his proceedings, and to speak evil of what we know not; and if we cannot account for the division of the drops of rain, or for the most common appearances in nature, it were highly absurd to quarrel with his providences, because we do not clearly see the reasons of his conduct.

[1.] God is great, and we know him not, cannot fathom his immensity, or comprehend his eternity; neither can the number of his years be searched out, who is from everlasting to everlasting; and here all our ideas are lost.

[2.] As unsearchable are his works. That the drops of dew descend, and from the clouds the rain pours down, we see; but how this wonder is performed, is yet a mystery, if we ascend to first principles. A little we know; but in a thousand inquiries into the nature and causes of things, we are enveloped with darkness; for who can understand the spreadings of the clouds? how poised in air they float? how from the smallest appearances they quickly darken the sky? how they collect their stores, or dispense them? or the noise of his tabernacle, the stormy winds which blow under heaven, or the thunders which utter their voices from the clouds? Behold, he spreadeth his light upon it, on the clouds his tabernacle; the light of the sun, which shines when the rain is blown over; or the lightning which flashes: and covereth the bottom of the sea with waters, thence to be raised, by the action of the sun and wind, into the clouds, as the vapour in the alembic. For by them judgeth he the people: he can when he pleases make them instruments of his vengeance, as in the flood, or, when in season and measure they gently water the earth, he giveth meat in abundance. With clouds he covereth the light, either shading the sultry beams of the sun, or with thick tempest in the sky turning the day into night; and commandeth IT NOT TO SHINE, by the cloud, or without this supplement to the text, by that which cometh betwixt, as in eclipses, when, by the interposition of the moon the sun is darkened, or the earth intercepts the sun-beams, while the moon passes through her shadow. The noise thereof sheweth concerning it, the whistling wind, or thunder, prognosticates the approaching rain; the cattle also, furnished with strange instinct, give tokens concerning the vapor, when the gathering storm approaches. In all which we see God's wondrous working, and are bound to magnify and praise him, whose wisdom is infinite, and his ways past finding out; and therefore in all his providences silent submission becomes our bounden duty.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 36:29". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-36.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Of the clouds; or rather, of a cloud, as it is in the Hebrew; whence it comes to pass that a small cloud, no bigger than a man’s hand, doth suddenly spread over the whole heavens: how the clouds come to be suddenly gathered together, and so condensed as to bring forth thunder and lightning, which here follows.

The noise of his tabernacle, i.e. the thunder produced in the clouds, which are oft called God’s tent or tabernacle, as Psalms 18:1 104:3, because there he ofttimes seems to dwell, and gives forth tokens of his powerful and glorious presence in those mighty works of thundering and lightning, wherewith men are frequently astonished and affrighted.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 36:29". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-36.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

29.The spreadings of the cloud — The unfolding of the cloud (thundercloud) along the sky, as in 1 Kings 18:44-45, where the swiftness with which the cloud spreads itself is, according to Maurer, compared to the movement of a hand “hither and thither.” For a like rendering of , “spread,” compare Psalms 105:39; Ezekiel 27:7. See note on Job 37:16.

The noise — Literally, “loud crashing” of thunder, which the poet represents as the crash of His tabernacle. The lofty imagination of Elihu conceived the thunder-cloud to be a booth, a temporary dwellingplace of the Most High. The deepest blackness of the cloud would favour the comparison to a tent, for, made of black goatskin, tents were pre-eminently dark. (Song of Solomon 1:5.) It is probable that the storm-cloud in which God finally revealed himself was already spreading upon the sky.

Strophe c The same wondrous providence and power of God subordinate the lightnings, even, to the benefit and well-being of men, and at the same time to the punishment of evil doers, Job 36:30-33.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-36.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

If. Hebrew, "Also can any understand the spreading out of the clouds, the elevation or noise of his pavilion?" (Haydock) --- What could be more magnificent that the throne of God! (Calmet)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-36.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"Can anyone understand the spreading of the clouds?" "Who understands, he asks, how God diffuses the clouds, or how He causes the thunder?" (Jackson p. 74). The expression in 36:29 "His pavilion" is a picturesque description of the sky.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-36.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

can any . . . ? Figure of speech Erotesis. App-6.

spreadings = suspensions, or floatings.

tabernacle = booth. Hebrew. sukkah.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-36.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Also can any understand the spreadings of the clouds, or the noise of his tabernacle?

Spreadings ... - the canopy of thick clouds which covers the heavens in a storm (Psalms 105:39).

The noise (crashing) of his tabernacle - namely, thunder; God being poetically said to have His pavilion amidst dark clouds (Psalms 18:11; Isaiah 40:22).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-36.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(29) The spreading of the clouds—i.e., how the clouds are spread over the heavens, and heaped up one upon the other like mountains in the skies when the storm gathers.

Or the noise of His tabernacle?—Or the thunderings of His pavilion (Psalms 18:12).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-36.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Also can any understand the spreadings of the clouds, or the noise of his tabernacle?
the spreadings
37:16; 38:9,37; 1 Kings 18:44,45; Psalms 104:3
the noise
37:2-5; Psalms 18:13; 29:3-10; 77:16-19; 104:7; Nahum 1:3; Habakkuk 3:10
Reciprocal: Job 26:8 - bindeth up;  Job 35:5 - the clouds;  Job 36:33 - noise

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 36:29". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-36.html.