Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 5:1

"Call now, is there anyone who will answer you? And to which of the holy ones will you turn?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
The Topic Concordance - Envy;   Foolishness;   Wrath;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Angels;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Angels (2);   Holiness Purity;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Eliphaz (2);   Job, Book of;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Holiness;   Proverbs, Book of;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Call now, if there be any - This appears to be a strong irony. From whom among those whose foundations are in the dust, and who are crushed before the moth, canst thou expect succor?

To which of the saints wilt thou turn? - To whom among the holy ones, (קדשים kedoshim ), or among those who are equally dependent on Divine support with thyself, and can do no good but as influenced and directed by God, canst thou turn for help? Neither angel nor saint can help any man unless sent especially from God; and all prayers to them must be foolish and absurd, not to say impious. Can the channel afford me water, if the fountain cease to emit it?

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Call now - The expressions used here, as Noyes has well observed, seem to be derived from the law, where the word “call” denotes the language of the complainant, and answer that of the defendant. According to this, the meaning of the words “call now” is, in jus voca: that is, call the Deity to account, or bring an action against him: or more properly, enter into an argument or litigation, as before a tribunal; see the notes at Isaiah 41:1, where similar language occurs.

If there be any that will answer thee - If there is anyone who will respond to thee in such a trial. Noyes renders this, “See if He will answer thee;” that is, “See if the Deity will condescend to enter into a judicial conroversy with thee, and give an account of his dealings toward thee.” Dr. Good renders it, “Which of these can come forward to thee; that is, “Which of these weakly, ephemeral, perishing insects - which of these nothings can render thee any assistance?” The meaning is probably, “Go to trial, if you can find any respondent; if there is any one willing to engage in such a debate; and let the matter be fairly adjudicated and determined. Let an argument be entered into before a competent tribunal, and the considerations pro and con be urged on the point now under consideration.” The desire of Eliphaz was, that there should be a fair investigation, where all that could be said on one side or the other of the question would be urged, and where there would be a decision of the important point in dispute. He evidently felt that Job would be foiled in the argument before whomsoever it should be conducted, and whoever might take up the opposite side; and hence, he says that he could get no one of “the saints” to assist him in the argument. In the expression, “if there be any that will answer thee,” he may mean to intimate that he would find no one who would be willing even to go into an investigation of the subject. The case was so plain, the views of Job were so obviously wrong, the arguments for the opinion of Eliphaz were so obvious, that he doubted whether anyone could be found who would be willing to make it the occasion of a set and formal trial, as if there could be any doubt about it.

And to which of the saints wilt thou turn? - Margin, as in Hebrew “look.” That is, to which of them wilt thou look to be an advocate for such sentiments, or which of them would be willing to go into an argument on so plain a subject? Grotins supposes that Eliphaz, having boasted that he had produced a divine revelation in his favor Job 4, now calls upon Job to produce, if he can, something of the same kind in his defense, or to see if there were any of the heavenly spirits who would give a similar revelation in his favor. The word here rendered “saints” (קדשׁים qôdeshı̂ym ) means properly those who are sanctified or holy; and it may be either applied to holy men, or to angels. It is generally supposed that it here refers to angels. So Schultens, Rosenmuller, Noyes, Good, and others, understand it. The word is often used in this sense in the Scriptures. So the Septuagint understands it here - ἤ εἴτινα ἀγγέλων ἁγίων ὄψῃ eitina angelōn hagiōn opsē Such is probably its meaning; and the sense of the passage is, “Call now upon anyone, and you will find none willing to be the advocate of such sentiments as you have urged. No holy beings - human beings or angels - would defend them.” By this, probably, Eliphaz designed to show Job that he differed from all holy being, and that his views were not those of a truly pious man. If he could find no one, either among holy angels or pious men, to be the advocate of his opinions, it followed that he must be in error.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-5.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

THE CONCLUSION OF ELPIHAZ' FIRST SPEECH

Eliphaz' speech revealed some good qualities in him. He no doubt believed that Job had been a righteous man; and in spite of the fact that he even suggested that the terrible misfortunes that came upon Job might have been in the category of `chastening' rather than as punishment, his smug and erroneous belief that such calamities were usually if not always the proof and punishment of wickedness must have been quite painful to Job.

Job 5:1-7

ELIPHAZ' WORD THAT JOB'S CASE WAS HOPELESS

"Call now; is there any that will answer thee?

And to which of the holy ones wilt thou turn?

For vexation killeth the foolish man,

And jealousy slayeth the silly one.

I have seen the foolish taking root:

But suddenly I cursed his habitation..

His children are far from safety,

And they are crushed in the gate,

Neither is there any to deliver them:

Whose harvest the hungry eateth up,

And taketh it even out of the thorns;

And the snare gapeth for their substance.

For affliction cometh not forth from the dust,

Neither doth trouble spring out of the ground:

But man is born unto trouble,

As the sparks fly upward."

"Is there any that will answer thee" (Job 5:1)? Such a question in Hebrew was an emphatic negative, with the meaning that, "Not even any of the angels would hear Job's prayer." "What he says is that, `it is futile to call out in prayer,' for no one will answer."[1] Eliphaz himself had just claimed that God heard him in prayer; so, "It is Job himself who is disqualified to pray."[2]

"Vexation killeth the foolish man" (Job 5:2). Eliphaz has concluded that Job's vexation and jealousy show that Job has become a fool. In his description of what happens to the fool, "Eliphaz deliberately goes through a whole roll of disasters corresponding so exactly to what had happened to Job, that each word is a poisoned arrow."[3]

"His children are far from safety" (Job 5:4). The implication of this is that Job's sins have also brought sorrow to his children. Of course, it is true that sin injures others besides the sinner. It is against God, against the sinner's family, against society, and against the sinner himself; "It is inevitable that when a man disgraces himself that his family share in it."[4] However. the tragedy of Eliphaz' observation here is that it had no application whatever to Job.

"Eliphaz and the other friends of Job were like men who close their eyes to the real facts, rock back on their heels, and speak of general principles, every one of which is contradicted by the indisputable facts before them."[5]

"And taketh it even out of the thorns" (Job 5:5). The imagery here is that of ancient harvests which were protected from raiders and vandals, "by thorn hedges."[6]

"Affliction cometh not forth from the dust ... Man is born unto trouble, as sparks fly upward" (Job 5:6-7). "Here Eliphaz says that trouble comes naturally to man; but he had just said the opposite,"[7] that trouble did not just rise up out of the dust, but it came as a consequence of wickedness.

Eliphaz' idea that disasters and calamities were invariably due to the sin of those who suffered such things was generally received throughout the ancient world. Even the Twelve asked Jesus, concerning the man born blind, "Who sinned? This man or his parents that he should have been born blind"? (John 9:2). Jesus put that old lie to rest with the declaration that neither the blind man nor his parents had sinned, but, "That the glory of God should be manifested in him."

It is true, of course that sin is the root and cause of all the sorrow and suffering of mankind; but that cannot mean that an individual sufferer of this or that misfortune is suffering because of his personal sin. David, Jeremiah, Jacob, Tamar, Uriah, - call the roll of Old Testament heroes; they all suffered from the sins of others, not from their own wickedness. "And what about Our Saviour himself?. He did no wrong, in fact, committed no sin whatever, yet he suffered the agony of the Cross. The argument of Eliphaz does not hold water."[8]

"As the sparks fly upward" (Job 5:7). In the Hebrew, this reads, "As the sons of Reseph, an old Canaanite god. Here Eliphaz has given up his attempt at a moral explanation of Job's disasters, offering dismal comfort."[9]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-5.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Call now, if there be any that will answer thee,.... That is, call upon God, which, if seriously, and not ironically spoken, was good advice; God is to be called upon, and especially in times of trouble; and invocation is to be made in faith, in sincerity, and with fervency, and to be accompanied with confession of sin, and repentance for it; and sooner or later God hears and answers those that call upon him; but Eliphaz suggests, that if Job did call upon him, it would be in vain, he would not hear him, he going upon the same maxim that the Jews did in Christ's time, "God heareth not sinners": John 9:31; or call upon him to give him an oracle from heaven, to favour him with a vision and revelation, and see if he could get anything that would confront and confute what he had delivered as coming that way; which, if it could be done by him, would appear to be a falsehood and an imposture, since one revelation from God is not contradicted by another: or else the sense is, "call" over the catalogue and list of good men that have been from the beginning of the world, and see if there be any that "answers to thee"F14היש עונך "si est correspondens tibi", Bolducius. , whose case, character, and behaviour, correspond with thee; if ever any of them was afflicted as thou art, or ever behaved with so much indecency, impatience, murmuring, and blasphemy against God, as thou hast done; that ever opened his mouth, and cursed the day of his birth, and reflected upon the providence and justice of God as thou hast, as if thou wert unrighteously dealt with: or rather, "call now", and summon all creatures together, angels and men, and get anyone of them to be thy patron, to defend thy cause, and plead for thee, to give a reply to what has been said, from reason, experience, and revelation: and shouldest thou obtain this, which is not likely, "lo, there is one that can answer thee"F15"Ecce est qui respondeat tibi", Schultens. , as some render the words, meaning either God or himself; thus Eliphaz insults Job, and triumphs over him, as being entirely baffled and conquered by him, by what he had related as an oracle and revelation from heaven:

and to which of the saints wilt thou turn? or "look", or "have respect"F16תפנה οψη, Sept. "obtueberis", Montanus; "respicies", Vatablus, Cocceius, Schmidt, Michaelis. , that will be of any service to thee? meaning either the Divine Persons in the Godhead, sometimes called Holy Ones, as in Joshua 24:19; Proverbs 9:10; the Holy Father, the Holy Son, and the Holy Spirit, who may and should be turned and looked unto; God the Father, as the God of providence and grace for all good things; Jesus Christ his Son, as the Redeemer and Saviour for righteousness and eternal life; the blessed Spirit, as a sanctifier to carry on and finish the work of grace; but it is suggested, it would be in vain for Job to turn and look to any of these, since he would be rejected by them as a wicked man, nor would any of them plead his cause: or else the holy angels, as the Septuagint express it, and who are called saints and Holy Ones, Deuteronomy 33:2; and it is asked, which of those he could turn or look to, and could expect relief and protection from? signifying, that none of these would vouchsafe to converse with him, nor take him under their care, nor undertake to plead his cause: or rather holy men, such as are sanctified or set apart by God the Father, to whom Christ is made sanctification, and in whose hearts the Holy Spirit has wrought principles of grace and holiness, and who live holy lives and conversations; and it is insinuated, that should he turn and took to these, he would find none of them like him, nor in the same circumstances, nor of the same sentiments, or that would take his part and plead for him; but that all to a man would appear of the same mind with Eliphaz, that none but wicked men were afflicted by God as he was, and that he was such an one, and that for the reason following: the Papists very absurdly produce this passage in favour of praying to departed saints, when not dead but living ones are meant, and even turning to them is discouraged; and besides, this would contradict another tenet of the Papists, that the Old Testament saints, until the coming of Christ, were in a sort of purgatory, called Limbus Patrum, and therefore incapable of helping saints on earth that should apply unto them.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Call now, if there be any that will a answer thee; and to which of the saints wilt thou turn?

(a) He wills Job to consider the example of all who have lived or live godly, whether any of them are like him in raging against God as he does.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Job 5:1-27. Eliphaz‘ conclusion from the vision.

if there be any, etc. — Rather, “will He (God) reply to thee?” Job, after the revelation just given, cannot be so presumptuous as to think God or any of the holy ones (Daniel 4:17, “angels”) round His throne, will vouchsafe a reply (a judicial expression) to his rebellious complaint.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-5.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Call now, if there be any that will answer thee; and to which of the saints wilt thou turn

Call — Call them all as it were by their names: will not every good man confirm what I say? If - Try if there be any one saint that will defend thee in these bold expostulations with God. Thou mayst find fools or wicked men, to do it: but not one of the children of God.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-5.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 5:1 Call now, if there be any that will answer thee; and to which of the saints wilt thou turn?

Ver. 1. Call now, if there be any that will answer thee] The beginning of this chapter is hard, saith Mercer, till you come to the seventh or eighth verses, and then all is plain and easy. That which Eliphaz driveth at here is, to drive Job out of all good conceit of his own condition, and to persuade him that never any good man suffered such hard and heavy things as he, or, at least, suffered them so untowardly and impatiently. Call, I pray thee, saith he, call over the roll, look into the records of former saints, and see if thou canst find among them all such another knotty piece as thyself, that needed so much hewing, and made such a deal of complaining. Was there ever the like heard of? Call now, if there be any one answerable to thee. Broughton rendereth it, Call now, if there be any one that will defend thee, that is, be thy patron or advocate, in word, or in the example of their lives.

And to which of the saints wilt thou turn?] q.d. Thou art alone, neither mayest thou hope to meet with thy match in the matter or manner of thine afflictions, unless it be among hypocrites and graceless persons, as Job 5:2. The Septuagint read it, To which of the angels wilt thou look? and the Popish commentators think they have here an unanswerable ground for their doctrine of invocation of saints and angels. But did not the buzzards take notice of an irony here, and that Eliphaz assureth Job that it would be in vain for him to call to any saint? &c. Is it not plain, or probable, at least, that he here meaneth the saints living in this world? or if not, yet is Gregory the Great of no authority with them, who acknowledgeth none other to be called upon, here meant, but God; and that the saints are mentioned to Job in derision, as if it were a ridiculous thing to call to them departed out of this life, who cannot hear us.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 5:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

CHAP. V.

Eliphaz sheweth that the wicked are always punished by an avenging God; on which account he highly extols the providence of God: he exhorts Job not to despise the chastening of the Almighty, and to attend diligently to what he says.

Before Christ 1645.

Job 5:1. Call now, &c.— Eliphaz here urges further, that, supposing Job had been guilty of no very atrocious crime, yet the common frailties of human nature were abundantly sufficient to account for any afflictions which it should please God to lay upon man; but he takes care to let Job know, that they had a far worse opinion of him, whom he treats as profligate and abandoned, and consequently a proper object of divine vengeance: Job 5:1-5. Such, he tells him, is the course of things, as was plain from revelation; and if he was not content with this, he was at liberty, if he pleased, to apply to any of the other deities, and see if he could find better treatment. But were it his case, he would endeavour to reconcile himself in a more especial manner to the true God, who was infinitely more powerful than any or all the gods of the nations, and was not only able to deliver him, but would deliver him out of all his troubles: but then it must be attended with an entire submission to him, which could never be effectual without an ample confession and restitution; thereby acknowledging the justice of God's dealing with him: Job 5:17; Job 5:27. It was foolish, therefore, to fret and vex himself in vain, since death was all that he could expect as the issue in that way; whereas, if he submitted himself to God, he might expect not only a perfect restoration, but a long continuance in the enjoyments of a flourishing fortune. All this is delivered by Eliphaz in an authoritative way, as the result of an inquiry which he and his friends had made of God in Job's behalf: he had therefore nothing to do, but diligently to attend and apply himself to it, Job 5:27. Heath. Schultens renders the first words of the present verse, make appeal now, &c.; observing, that call and answer here have a judicial sense, and imply, that if the patriarch should be inclined to plead not guilty, he would meet with no one, either among men or angels, who would undertake the defence of his cause: for, says he, the word קדשׁים kedoshim, rendered saints, signifies the angels, superintendants (under the Almighty) over this visible world. This opinion was probably of great antiquity, especially if the Septuagint version of Deuteronomy 32:8 be right: he set the bounds of the people according to the number of the angels of God. This and the following verse, says Heath, are a strong irony.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 5:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-5.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

The speech of Eliphaz is continued through the whole of this chapter. He dwells upon several circumstances concerning sin and its consequent affliction, and recommends in affliction a crying unto God.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-5.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

JOB CHAPTER 5

Wrath foolish: the wicked miserable, Job 5:1-5. Evil cometh not by chance; it is natural to our condition, Job 5:6,7. This is our motive to prayer and trust in God, Job 5:8; whose unsearchable power and wisdom are against the high and crafty, for the relief of the poor, Job 5:9-16. Their happiness whom God correcteth, and God’s gracious care of such, Job 5:17-27.

Call now, i.e. invite, or make proclamation, as this word is oft used, as Deuteronomy 20:10 Jude 12:1 Jeremiah 2:2 3:12 7:2. Call them all as it were by their names; consult the whole catalogue of them all, which thou didst ever know or hear of.

If there be any, to wit, of the saints, as it follows.

That will answer thee, i.e. comply with thee, answer thy desires or expectations; try if there be any one saint that will defend or allow thee in these bold expostulations with God; or, as it is in the Hebrew,

if there be any that doth answer thee, i.e. whose opinion or disposition and carriage is answerable or like to thine. So answering is sometimes used, as Proverbs 27:19 Ecclesiastes 10:19. Thou wilt find many fools or wicked men, as it follows, Job 5:2, to answer or imitate thee in their speeches and carriages, but not one of the saints like thee; which deserves thy serious consideration, and gives thee just cause to question thine integrity.

The saints; either,

1. The angels, who are sometimes called saints, as Job 15:15 Daniel 8:13 Zechariah 14:5, because they are eminently and perfectly holy; or rather,

2. Holy men, as appears both from the word, which most commonly is so used, and from the opposition of the foolish man to these, Job 5:2, and because the example of men was more proper and effectual for Job’s conviction than of angels.

Wilt thou turn, or look? look about thee, view them all, and see if thou canst find one like thee.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 5:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

Third double strophe — APPLICATION OF THE VISION, Job 5:1-7. First strophe — The folly of murmuring, Job 5:1-5.

1.If there be any — Literally, Is there he? The Septuagint renders the verse, “But call, if any one will hearken to thee, or if thou shalt see any of the holy angels.”

The saints , (the holy.) As this term is employed both of good men and good angels, (Deuteronomy 33:2-3; Psalms 34:9, etc.,) its meaning must be determined by the context. The idea of Eliphaz is, that Job, in his present mood, need expect no sympathy or help from any quarter. The vision just cited has established the inferiority of all beings in the sight of God, and, as declared in the afflictions of Job, the infinite wisdom of his will. After God has spoken there is none other — holy man or angel — who will either deign or dare to make reply to his (Job’s) complaints. To reply, even, might foster the spirit of rebellion. Murmuring belongs to man, not to the angels. That there can be no reference, as the Romanists teach, to any intercession of angels, is evident from the comparatively low estimate in which the vision had held them. See Job 5:8; Job 4:18. Nor is it a challenge to Job, as Grotius and others have held, to produce a similar revelation in his own favour. Nor is there any ground for the suggestion of Schultens, that “call” and “answer” are forensic terms, thus versified by Scott: —

“Be now complainant, the defendant see;

Which angel will espouse thy daring plea?

 

 

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-5.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 5:1. Call now, &c. — Wouldst thou know the reason why I relate to thee this night vision? I do it with an intent that thou mayest apply it to thyself, and thy present circumstances. Thou hast heard how weak and imperfect the best of men must be in comparison with God, but if this does not satisfy thee, if thou dost not believe what has been advanced, thou mayest inquire of others. Try, therefore, if there be any one that will defend thee in these thy bold expostulations with God. Thou mayest find fools or wicked men that will do it, but not one of the children of God. There is no good man but is of my opinion; and if an angel should appear to thee as one did to me, thou wouldst receive no other information but this.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 5:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-5.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Saints. This is a proof of the invocation of the saints (Calmet) and angels. (Haydock) --- The Jews often begged God to have mercy on them for the sake of the patriarchs, 2 Paralipomenon vi. 42. (Calmet) --- Eliphaz, therefore, exhorts Job, if he have any patron or angel, to bring him forward in his defence. (Menochius) --- Septuagint, "Invoke now if any one will hear thee, or if thou perceive any of the holy angels," (Haydock) as I have done. (Menochius) --- He extols himself, to correct the pretended presumption of his friend, (Calmet) and other defects, which none will dare to deny, as he supposes. See St. Gregory, v. 30. (Worthington)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-5.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"Call now, is there anyone who will answer you? And to which of the holy ones will you turn?"

Eliphaz contends that there is no one who can defend or protect Job, certainly not the holy ones or angels ().

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-5.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

to which . . . ? Figure of speech Erotesis. App-6. In the Vulgate versions this is changed to a command: and it is quoted in support of "the invocation of saints".

saints = holy ones: i.e. the angels. Compare Job 15:15. Deuteronomy 33:2. Jude 1:14. So Septuagint. See note on "holy". Exodus 3:5.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Call now, if there be any that will answer thee; and to which of the saints wilt thou turn?

If there be any ... - rather, 'Call now! will He [God] reply to thee?' Job, after the revelation just given, cannot be so presumptuous as to think God, or any of the holy ones (Daniel 4:17, angels) round His throne, will vouchsafe a reply (a judicial expression) to his rebellious complaint (Umbreit). I prefer the English Version. Job may call as loud as he will, complaining of wrongful treatment, but none will answer from above. No holy (English Version, saint) angel will undertake to be advocate of so bad a cause. The idea of heavenly advocacy for man is found Job 33:23; Zechariah 1:12.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

V.

(1) Call now.—The speaker now becomes more personal and direct in his tone and bearing. He insinuates that Job is “unwise” and “silly,” and promises swift destruction for all such.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Call now, if there be any that will answer thee; and to which of the saints wilt thou turn?
and to which
15:8-10,15; Isaiah 41:1,21-23; Hebrews 12:1
the saints
4:18; 15:15; Deuteronomy 33:2,3; Psalms 16:3; 106:16; Ephesians 1:1
turn
or, look.
Reciprocal: Job 13:4 - ye are forgers

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 5:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-5.html.