Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 5:15

"But He saves from the sword of their mouth, And the poor from the hand of the mighty.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Faith;   God;   Philosophy;   Poor;   Righteous;   Thompson Chain Reference - God's;   Poor, the;   Promises, Divine;   The Topic Concordance - God;   Poverty;   Salvation;  
Dictionaries:
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Brother;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He saveth the poor from the sword, from their mouth - This is rather a harsh construction. To avoid this, some have proposed to render מחרב mechereb, which we translate from the sword, the persecuted, but, I am afraid, on very slender authority. Instead of מפיהם מחרב mechereb mippihem, "from the sword, from their mouth," eleven of Kennicott and De Rossi's MSS. read פיהם מחרב mechereb pihem, from the sword of their mouth; and with these MSS. the Chaldee, Vulgate, Syriac, and Arabic agree. The verse, therefore, may be translated thus: -

He saveth from the sword of their mouth;

The poor from the hand of the mighty.

Or thus: -

He saveth from the sword of their mouth;

And with a strong hand the impoverished.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

But he saveth the poor from the sword - He shows himself to be the friend and protector of the defenseless. The phrase “from the sword, from their mouth,” has been variously interpreted. Dr. Good renders it,

So he saveth the persecutors from their mouth,

And the helpless from the hand of the violent.”

Noyes,

So he saveth the persecuted from their mouth,

The oppressed from the hand of the mighty.”

This rendering is obtained by changing the points in the word מחרב mēchereb “from the sword,” to מחרב māchĕrāb making it the Hophal participle from חרב chârab to make desolate. This was proposed by Capellus, and has been adopted by Durell, Michaelis, Dathe, Doederlein, and others. Rosenmuller pronounces it wholly unauthorized. Jerome renders it, a gladio otis eorum - “from the sword of their mouth.” It seems to me that the whole verse may be literally rendered, “he saveth from the sword, from their mouth, and from the hand of the strong, the poor.” According to this version, the phrase “from their mouth” may either mean from the mouth, i. e. the edge of the sword, using the plural for the singular, or from the mouth of oppressors, using it to represent their violence, and their disposition to devour the poor. The latter is more probably the true interpretation, and there is no need of a ehange in the points in the Hebrew. Thus, interpreted, the sense is, that God preserves the poor from oppression; or, in other words, that he befriends them, and is therefore worthy of confidence. This sentiment accords with what is found everywhere in the Bible.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-5.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

But he saveth the poor,.... Who are so in a literal sense, and whom the Lord saves with a temporal salvation; these being the butt of the crafty, wise, and cunning, on whom their eyes are, for whom they lay snares, and lie in wait to draw them in; and these being helpless and without friends, God takes notice of them, appears for them, and arises for their help, and saves them:

from the sword; of their enemies, drawn against them and ready to be sheathed in them:

from their mouth; from their reproaches, calumnies, detraction, and evil speaking; or "from the sword, their mouth"F23So some in Michaelis. , as some; or "from the sword of their mouth"F24"A gladio oris eorum", V. L. "a gladio qui ex ore eorum", De Dieu, Schultens. , as others; or which comes out of it; whose mouths and tongues are as sharp swords, which destroy their credit and reputation, and threaten them with ruin; the Targum is,"from the slaughter of their mouth:"

and from the hand of the mighty; their mighty enemies, that, are mightier than they; the Targum is,"from the hand of a mighty king;'such an one as Pharaoh, which the same paraphrase makes mention of in Job 5:14, and from whom the poor Israelites were delivered: this may be applied to the poor in a spiritual sense, who are poor in spirit, and are sensible of their spiritual poverty, whom the Lord looks unto, has a regard for, and saves them from "the sword" of avenging justice; that being awaked against the man, his fellow, and so warded off from them, and from the mouth of a cursing and condemning law, and from Satan the accuser of the brethren; and of wicked men, whose tongue rising up in judgment against them, he condemns; and from the "hand" of Satan the strong man armed, and who is stronger than they; and of all their spiritual enemies.

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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

But he saveth the p poor from the sword, from their q mouth, and from the hand of the mighty.

(p) That is, he who humbles himself before God.

(q) He compares the slander of the wicked to sharp swords.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

“From the sword” which proceedeth “from their mouth” (Psalm 59:7; Psalm 57:4).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-5.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

But he saveth the poor from the sword, from their mouth, and from the hand of the mighty.

Mouth — Which was ready to swallow them up.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-5.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 5:15 But he saveth the poor from the sword, from their mouth, and from the hand of the mighty.

Ver. 15. But he saveth the poor from the sword] From the woe of war, from the hurt of it, not always from the smart of it; for all such promises as this of temporal deliverance are ever to be taken with exception of the cross, which yet shall be so sanctified, that the saints shall say, It was good for us to have been afflicted; provided that they may be poor in spirit (for God will save the humble person, Job 22:29), and sue in forma pauperis, as spiritual beggars, such as get their living by begging; the word signifieth needy and desirous of relief, very indigent, and therefore humbly suppliant for supply of things necessary. "This poor man cried, and the Lord heard him (meaning himself), and saved him out of all his troubles," Psalms 34:6. "Forget not the congregation of thy poor for ever," Psalms 74:19. He will not, he cannot, for they are written upon the palms of his hands, so that he cannot look beside them. Who hath not heard bow graciously poor Geneva hath been preserved? Rochel relieved, as it were, by a miracle? A. D. 1573; Leyden rescued from the duke of Alva’s sword: that very night that he thought to have stormed it, the winds turned, the tide swelled, and the waters came in, and forced him to raise the siege. How well might these poor saved ones sit and sing with David, Psalms 68:20, "He that is our God is the God of salvation; and unto God the Lord belong the issues from death."

From their mouth] Which is a sword, so some sense it; God saveth his poor from the sword of their enemies’ mouth, or the sword that comes out of their mouth. A gladio oris eorum, saith the Vulgate. David felt the false tongues of his enemies as a murdering weapon in his bones, Psalms 42:10. The tongue is thin, broad, and long, like a sword, it is also red like a flaming sword; by calumnies and false testimonies many are those that fall down wounded, Proverbs 12:6; Proverbs 18:8; Proverbs 26:22. Korah and his complices stick not to object to the meekest of men with one breath, pride, ambition, and usurpation of authority, but; God vindicated his reputation. Mary was accused three times; the Pharisees accused her of presumption, Luke 7:39; Martha of carelessness, Luke 10:40; Judas of wastefulness, John 12:5; but Christ ever answered for her, and took her part. And was it not so with Job? Job 42:12-17; is there not a promise to all saints? Psalms 37:6.

From the hand of the mighty] God sayeth his, not only from the virulent tongues, but from the violent hands also of the mighty, that might overcome not right, that the poor fall not by his strong ones, or into his strong paws and parts, Psalms 10:10, where oppressors are fitly compared to lions lying in wait for their prey. Now to be thus saved from the slaying sword, the slandering tongue, and the oppressing hand, is complete salvation.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 5:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 5:15. He saveth the poor from the sword, from their mouth, &c.— Schultens imagines that it should be read, from the sword which proceedeth out of his mouth; and this reading receives no small confirmation from Psalms 57:4; Psalms 64:3. But Mr. Heath renders it, He delivereth the desolate out of their mouth, and the poor from the hand of the mighty.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 5:15". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-5.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The poor, or helpless; who therefore flee to God for refuge.

From their mouth, or,

from the sword which cometh out of their mouth, i.e. from all their censures, slanders, threatenings, deceitful insinuations, false swearings of witnesses, unrighteous sentences of corrupt judges, whereby their good names, or estates, or lives may be exposed to the utmost hazards. And this is fitly opposed to the sword of the hand, implied in the next branch of the verse. Or, from the sword by their mouths, i.e. by those wicked men’s own words against the godly, which God wonderfully overruleth to the working out of their deliverance.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 5:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15.From the sword . Doderlein, Michaelis, and Conant propose to change the pointing of the original, in order to make a direct object of the verb; thus, , desolated, and read, “So he rescues the victim from their mouth, and the needy from the hand of the strong.” Dr. Adam Clarke adduces eleven of Kennicott’s and De Rossi’s manuscripts as reading, “from the sword of their mouth,” with which agree the Vulgate, Syriac, and Arabic. The rendering of Zockler, Umbreit, and most moderns, accords with that of Delitzsch — from the sword, (that) of their mouth, that is, that proceeds from their mouth — who also remarks that the text is sound and beautiful. Compare Psalms 64:3, “who whet their tongue like a sword.” The shape of the tongue may have led to its comparison to a sword; certainly its power to cut, to wound, has ever led the Oriental to associate the two together.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-5.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 5:15. But he saveth the poor, &c. — According to the order in which the words stand in the Hebrew, the translation is, But he saveth from the sword, from their mouth, and from the hand of the mighty, the poor. Schultens thinks it should be interpreted, from the sword which proceedeth out of their mouth, meaning, their cutting and killing reproaches. A sense this which is approved by Buxtorf, and which receives no small confirmation from divers passages of Scripture, in which reproachful language is stigmatized by the name of a sword. See Psalms 57:4; Psalms 64:3. Dr. Waterland’s translation of the verse is to the same purpose. But he saveth the poor from destruction by their mouth, and from the hand of the mighty. The general sense undoubtedly is, that God saveth such as, being poor, are defenceless, and therefore flee to him for refuge, from the censures, slanders, threatenings, and deceitful insinuations of their enemies; from the false swearing of witnesses, and the unrighteous sentences of corrupt judges, by which things their characters, or estates, or lives, may be exposed to great hazards.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 5:15". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-5.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Mouth; detraction and calumny. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-5.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

poor = needy.

from. Some codices, with Aramaean, Syriac, and Vulgate, read "of".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

But he saveth the poor from the sword, from their mouth, and from the hand of the mighty.

From the sword which proceedeth from their mouth - (Psalms 59:7). "Swords are in their lips" (Psalms 57:4) - i:e., from the mouth of the mighty oppressors.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(15) From the sword, from their mouth.—It is merely a matter of grammatical nicety whether we regard the sword as coming forth from their mouth, or as identical with what comes forth from it, or as the first of three things from which the poor are delivered. It is worthy of special note that the Lord is thus conceived of and represented, as the Saviour, and the Saviour of them who have no saviour. Is not this an idea confined to the circle of the sacred writings? At all events, it so abounds and predominates in them as to be pre-eminently, if not exclusively, characteristic of them.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

But he saveth the poor from the sword, from their mouth, and from the hand of the mighty.
he saveth
Psalms 10:14,17; 35:10; 72:4,12,13; 107:41; 109:31; 140:12
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 19:10 - he slipped;  Job 10:1 - My soul;  Psalm 10:9 - when;  Psalm 12:5 - puffeth at;  Psalm 82:4 - rid;  Psalm 107:42 - iniquity;  Psalm 113:7 - raiseth;  Isaiah 25:4 - thou hast

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 5:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-5.html.