Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 5:24

"You will know that your tent is secure, For you will visit your abode and fear no loss.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Faith;   Fear of God;   Happiness;   Holiness;   Peace;   Righteous;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Peace;  
Dictionaries:
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Tabernacle;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Deliverance, Deliverer;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Habitation;   Nothing;   Peace;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Thou shalt know - Thou shalt be so fully satisfied of the friendly disposition of all thy neighbors, that thou shalt rest secure in thy bed, and not be afraid of any danger, though sleeping in thy tent in the field; and when thou returnest from thy country excursions, thou shalt find that thy habitation has been preserved in peace and prosperity, and that thou hast made no mistake in thy trust, in thy confidence, or in thy confederates. The word אהלך oholecha, "thy tabernacle," means simply a tent, or moveable dwelling, composed of poles, pins, and cloth, or skin, to be pitched any where in a few moments, and struck again with the same ease. The word נוך navecha, which we properly translate thy habitation, signifies a solid, permanent dwelling-place. See Joshua 22:4, Joshua 22:6-8; 2 Samuel 18:17; 2 Samuel 19:8; 1 Kings 12:16; Psalm 52:7; Psalm 91:10; Psalm 132:3; Lamentations 2:4; Malachi 2:12; and with these passages compare the place in the text. As to תחטא techeta, which we translate thou shalt not Sin, it comes from חטא chata, to err, to mistake, to miss the mark: hence to sin, transgress God's laws, seeking for happiness in forbidden and unlawful things, and therefore missing the mark, because in them happiness is not to be found: and it is very likely, from the connection above, that to mistake or err is its meaning in this place. I need not add, that the Arab chiefs, who had their castles or strong holds, frequently in their country excursions lodged in tents in the open fields; and that on such occasions a hostile neighbor sometimes took advantage of their absence, attacked and pillaged their houses, and carried off their families and household. See at the end of this chapter, Job 5:27; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And thou shalt know that thy tabernacle shall be in peace - Thy tent - אהלך 'âhelēkāh - showing that it was common then to dwell in tents. The sense is, that when he was away from home he would have confidence that his dwelling was secure, and his family safe. This would be an assurance producing no small degree of consolation in a country abounding in wild beasts and robbers. Such is the nature of the blessing which Eliphaz says the man would have who put his confidence in God, and committed his cause to him. To a certain extent this was, and is, undoubtedly true. A man cannot indeed have miraculous assurance when from home, that his wife and children are still alive, and in health; nor can he be certain that his dwelling is not wrapped in flames, or that it has been preserved from the intrusion of evil-minded men. But he may feel assured that all is under the wise control of God; that whatever occurs will be by his permission and direction, and will tend to ultimate good. He may also, with calmness and peace, commit his home with all that is dear to him to God, and feel that in his hands all is safe.

And thou shalt visit thy habitation - That is, on the return from a journey.

And not sin - This is a very unhappy translation. The true sense is thou shalt not miss thy dwelling; thou shalt not wander away lost, to return no more. The word used here, and which is rendered “sin” in our common version, is חטא châṭâ' It is true that it is commonly rendered to sin, and that it often has this sense. But it properly means “to miss;” that is, not to hit the mark, spoken of a slinger. Judges 20:16; then to make a false step, to stumble or fall, Proverbs 19:2. It thus accords exactly in sense with the Greek ἁμαρτάνω hamartanō Here the original sense of the Hebrew word should bo retained, meaning that he would not miss the way to his dwelling; that is, that he would be permitted to return to it in safety. Gesenius, however, renders it, “thou musterest thy pasture (flocks), and missest naught:” that is, nothing is gone; all thy flocks are there. But the more obvious sense, and a sense which the connection demands, is that which refers the whole description to a man who is on a journey, and who is exposed to the dangers of wild beasts, and to the perils of a rough and stony way, but who is permitted to visit his home without missing it or being disappointed. A great variety ofinterpretations have been given of the passage, which may be seen in Rosenmuller and Good. Many suppose it means that he should review his domestic aflfairs, and find all to his mind; or should find that everything was in its place, or was as it should be. It can, not be doubted that the Hebrew word “visit” (פקד pâqad ) will bear this interpretation, but that above proposed seems to me best to suit the connection. The margin correctly renders it, err.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-5.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 5:24

Thy tabernacle shall be in peace.

Returning from a journey

These words may be considered as a promise made to a good man, with regard to his absence from home. When he goes a journey at the call of providence, he may leave all his concerns with the Lord whom he serves, for He will guide his steps, and suffer no evil to befall him nor any plague to come nigh his dwelling. The person to whom this promise is made is supposed to have a house. It is called a “tabernacle, or tent.” It would be well for us to view our abode, however pleasing and durable it may appear, as only a temporary residence--a shelter of accommodation for a traveller. David calls his palace the “tabernacle of his house.” Home has a thousand attractions. But dear as it is, we must sometimes leave it. Sometimes journeys are necessary. When God calls us abroad, He will take care of us, and we may hope to find the proverb true, The path of duty is the path of safety. Hence he is reminded of the welfare of his house and family in his absence. Thou shalt know that thy tabernacle is in peace. Peace means prosperity. Peace is harmony. There can be no happiness in a family, among the members of which are found reserve, suspicions, bickerings, contentions. Peace is preservation. To how many disasters is a family exposed if God withdraws His protection. Nor shall the tabernacle only be preserved, but the owner too. We always travel in jeopardy. Are no suitable returns to be made to the God of our salvation? A man would sin if his gratitude were not lively and practical. He would sin, did he not confide in God for the future more simply and firmly. Learn, domestic piety crowns domestic peace. (William Jay.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 5:24". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-5.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And thou shalt know that thy tabernacle shall be in peace,.... Not a place of religious worship, though the Targum renders it an house of doctrine or instruction; for we read not of any such but the tabernacle of Moses, erected in the wilderness, and which was indeed about, or little after, the times of Job; but it cannot be reasonably thought he did or could attend there; nor the tabernacle of his body, now in great pain and anguish, in which there were no rest nor soundness, being filled with sore boils and burning ulcers; but his dwelling house, which was built as a tent or tabernacle: such were the houses of the eastern people, made to move from place to place, for the sake of pasturage for their flocks and herds, in which their wealth consisted; so Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, dwelt in tabernacles; and hence in later times more firm, fixed, and stable dwellings, were so called; David calls his palace the tabernacle of his house, Psalm 132:3; though this also includes all that dwelt in his house, his family; and the meaning is, that should he behave aright under the afflicting hand of God, his family should live in concord, harmony, and love; there should be no discord, animosity, and contention among them, but they should be at peace and in unity among themselves; as indeed Job's children were while he had them, and before this calamity came upon him; and that also they should be secure from enemies, and dwell unmolested by them; and be in the utmost safety, enjoying all kind of prosperity, inward and outward, temporal and spiritual; which the word peace includes, as used in eastern countries, whose common salutation was, "peace be with thee"; thereby wishing all kind of happiness: or the words may be rendered, "peace shall be thy tabernacle"F9כי שלום אהלך "quod pax tentorium tuum", Montanus, Bolducius; so Cocceius, Schmidt, Schultens. as is a good man's tabernacle: he dwells in God, who is all love, all peace, in whom there is no wrath or fury; he dwells by faith in Christ, who is his peace, his peace maker, and peace giver; and in whom he has peace amidst all the tribulation he meets with in the world; the peace of God, which passes all understanding, keeps and guards him in Christ, as in a garrison, safe and secure; and he enjoys much peace, as the fruit of the Spirit, arising from a view of interest in the blood, righteousness, and sacrifice of Christ; and when he dies he enters into peace, and dwells and abides in it as his everlasting mansion, Isaiah 57:2; now all this, Eliphaz says, Job, behaving well, should know; that is, have an experience of it; should really enjoy it, and find it in fact true what he asserted:

and thou shalt visit thy habitation, and shalt not sin; meaning not his wife, as some interpreters, Jewish and Christian, understand it; and so in the TalmudF11T. Bab. Sabbat, fol. 34. 1. Yebamot, fol. 62. 2. & 63. 1. Sanhedrin, fol. 76. 2. , the word being rendered "she that tarried at home", Psalm 68:12; which is a description of a good housewife, that keeps at home and minds the affairs of her family; but rather it designs the same as his tabernacle in the preceding clause, his dwelling house, and signifies a fine, fair, and beautiful one; a spacious and goodly building, and well stored with rich household goods; and including his family also: and to "visit" this is to take care of his family, rule and govern them well, protect and defend them, and provide all things necessary for them; as well as to inspect into the affairs of his house, inquire, examine, and see how things are managed; to know the state, condition, and circumstances it is in; which is looking well to the ways of his household: and this he should do, and "not sin"; not that a man, even a good man, can so conduct himself always in his family as not to be guilty of any sin at all, but not of sin in common, or continually; at least not any gross and notorious ones: the sense is, that he should not sin himself, while making such a visit and inquiry, by an undue heat, excessive anger, by rash and passionate expressions, things not being entirely to his mind; or be the cause of sin in others, by provoking his children to wrath, by threatening and menacing his servants in a severe, boisterous, and blustering manner; but reproving both, as there may be occasion, in a mild and gentle way; or else not sin by conniving at it and not correcting for it, which was the fault of Eli: Ben Gersom thinks Eliphaz tacitly suggests, and strikes at, Job's indulgence to his children; and so Sephorno: the word used having the signification of wandering and straying, some take the sense to be this; that he should have a sure and certain dwelling place to come into, and abide in, and should not wander aboutF12לא תחטא "non errabis, i.e. non eris erro et palans", Codurcus; "non aberrabis", Beza, Piscator, Cocceius. , or be as a stroller and vagabond in the earth: though this has sometimes been the case of good men; as of the godly in the times of the Maccabees, who wandered in deserts and mountains, in caves and dens of the earth; and even of the disciples of Christ, who had no certain dwelling place; yea, of Christ himself, who had not where to lay his head: rather, since the word signifies to miss the mark, and so be disappointed; in which sense it is used in Judges 20:16; the sense may be, that when he visited his habitation he should find nothing amiss or wanting, but everything should answer his expectations and wishes, so Aben Ezra; and Mr. Broughton renders it, "shalt not misprosper"; and others, "shalt no be frustrated"F13"Nec votis frustrabere", Schultens. ; balked, disappointed of thine ends and views, designs, hopes, and wishes.

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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And thou shalt know that thy tabernacle [shall be] in peace; and thou shalt visit thy habitation, and shalt not x sin.

(x) God will so bless you that you will have opportunity to rejoice in all things, and not be offended.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

know — “Thou shalt rest in the assurance, that thine habitation is the abode of peace; and (if) thou numberest thine herd, thine expectations prove not fallacious” [Umbreit]. “Sin” does not agree with the context. The Hebrew word - “to miss” a mark, said of archers (Judges 20:16). The Hebrew for “habitation” primarily means “the fold for cattle”; and for “visit,” often to “take an account of, to number.” “Peace” is the common Eastern salutation; including inward and outward prosperity.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-5.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And thou shalt know that thy tabernacle shall be in peace; and thou shalt visit thy habitation, and shalt not sin.

Know — By certain experience.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-5.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 5:24 And thou shalt know that thy tabernacle [shall be] in peace; and thou shalt visit thy habitation, and shalt not sin.

Ver. 24. And thou shalt know] Thine own eyes shall see it, and thine experience seal to it; thou shalt be well assured of it. This is a sweet mercy: it is the sweetmeats of the feast of a good conscience, saith Latimer, to know that all shall go well with us here, and that our names are written in the book of life; to be able to conclude from temporal blessings to eternal, as David doth, Psalms 23:5-6; to have not only sustentation, but suavities spiritual sweets, as one speaketh.

That thy tabernacle shall be in peace] i.e. Thy house, household, and household stuff shall be in safety; and all shall be as well with thee as heart can wish. Or, thy tabernacle shall be peace. Thou shall be free from domestic dissensions. It is a sign of a Christian family, if the son of peace be there, and peace rest in it, Luke 10:6. This turneth water to wine, and the contrary: where envying and strife is there is confusion (or unquietness) and every evil work, James 3:16. Such a tabernacle is more like to a kennel of hounds than a family of Christians.

And thou shalt visit thy habitation] As a busy bishop, within thine own diocese, thou shall carefully inquire into the state of thy family, and take an account of all that are under thy roof; that God be sincerely served there, and all things well husbanded, Proverbs 27:26-27.

And shalt not sin] viz. By too much indulgence to children and servants, Eli’s sin, who brought up his children to bring down his house; or, thou shall not be found guilty, sc. of thy family’s faults imputed unto thee; or, thou shalt not miss, sc. of thy desire and expectation, but all shall go as well within doors as heart can wish.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 5:24". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 5:24. And thou shalt know that thy tabernacle, &c.— Know moreover, that peace shall encompass thee at a tent; thou shalt visit thy habitation, and not be disappointed. Heath. Thou shalt provide for thy habitation, and shalt not be in want of any thing. Houbigant.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 5:24". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-5.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thou shalt know, by certain and constant experience,

that thy tabernacle, i.e. thy habitation, as it follows, including also the inhabitants, children, or friends and servants,

shall be in peace; shall enjoy great safety from all their enemies, and concord among themselves, and prosperity in all their concerns; all which are comprehended under the sweet name of

peace. Visit thy habitation, i.e. manage and order thy family, and all thy domestic affairs and worldly concerns, with care and diligence. Visiting is oft used for regarding or taking care of, as Genesis 21:1 Ruth 1:6 Psalms 8:4 80:14.

Shalt not sin; either by unrighteousness in thy dealings with thy family or others, or by neglecting God and his service in thy family, or by winking at any sin in thy domestics which thou canst hinder. But because he speaks not here of Job’s duty, but of his privilege, and that in outward and worldly things, it seems better rendered by others,

and thou shalt not err, or miscarry, or miss thy way or mark, as this very word is used below, Job 24:19 14:16 Jude 20:16; thou shalt not be disappointed of thy hopes, or blasted in thy endeavours, but shalt succeed in them. Or, and thou shalt not wander, or be a wanderer, having no house in which to put his head, which Job might have some ground to fear; but thou shalt have a habitation of thy own, which thou shalt visit and manage as thou didst before.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 5:24". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

24.Thy tabernacle shall be’ peace — Hebrews, ohel; equally a tent in which to live and the house of God in which to worship. Our homes should be God’s houses; then shall they be peace.

And shalt not sin — Or err, as in the margin. Among the radical meanings of the word are, to miss, want, miss the mark. The word originally used in a physical sense, for instance, of the skill of the warrior, (Judges 20:16,) took upon itself a moral meaning, as in the case of the Greek αμαρτανω. Comp. Iliad, 5:287, and 9:501.* The sense of this passage, according to most moderns, is, that he shall return to his dwelling and find nothing wanting. Thus Wordsworth: “Not one of thy cattle, sheep, or lambs will be missing” — a forced and feeble interpretation. The more natural reading — which at the same time is consistent with the legitimate sense of the verb — is that of the Vulgate, Luther, and our English version, that the good man may be kept by the grace of God from the commission of sin. As “habitation” corresponds with “tabernacle” of the preceding clause, so does God’s protection from sin answer to the “peace” Eliphaz promises. The antithesis is thus well sustained, and the sense harmonious. Hengstenberg accepts of the English version, and explains: “In looking over thy possessions thou shalt find thou art not treated by God as a sinner but as a friend, being richly blessed by him” — a paraphrase which Evans rightly condemns.

[* The following hymn, taken from the Rig Veda, 7:85, contains a similar thought:

1. Let me not yet, O Varuna, enter into the house of clay; have mercy, Almighty, have mercy!

2. If I go along trembling like a cloud driven by the wind; have mercy, Almighty, have mercy!

3. Through want of strength, thou strong and bright God, have I gone to the wrong shore; have mercy, Almighty, have mercy! — See further, MULLER’S Sanscrit. Lit., p. 540.]

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-5.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 5:24. And thou shalt know — By certain and constant experience; that thy tabernacle shall be in peace — That is, thy habitation, as it follows, including also the inhabitants, children or friends, and servants. They shall enjoy great safety from all their enemies, and concord among themselves, and prosperity in all their concerns; all which things are comprehended under the sweet name of peace. And thou shalt visit thy habitation — Shalt order and manage thy family, and all thy domestic and worldly affairs, with care and diligence; and shalt not sin — Either by unrighteousness in thy dealings, with thy family or others; or by neglecting God and his service in thy family, or by conniving at any sin in thy domestics, which thou canst hinder. But because Job’s duty does not seem to be the subject of Eliphaz’s discourse here, but rather his privilege, and that in outward and worldly things, the clause is probably better rendered thus: And thou shalt not err, or miscarry, or miss thy way. Thou shalt not be disappointed of thy hopes, or blasted in thy endeavours, but shalt succeed in them. “When thou takest an account of thine estate,” says Bishop Patrick, “all things shall answer thine expectation.”

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 5:24". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-5.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Beauty does not mean his wife, as some grossly imagine, (Calmet) but a house well ordered. (Menochius) --- Hebrew, "thy habitation." Yet Sanchez adopts the former sentiment. In effect, the habitation includes all the regulation of a wife and family. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-5.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

tabernacle = tent, or less settled house.

shalt not sin = shalt nothing miss. Hebrew. chata". App-44. See below.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And thou shalt know that thy tabernacle shall be in peace; and thou shalt visit thy habitation, and shalt not sin.

Know - as a matter of blessed experience. 'Thou shalt rest in the assurance that thine habitation is (not as the English version, shall be) the abode of peace; and (if) thou numberest thine herd, thine expectations prove not fallacious' (Umbreit). Sin does not agree with the context. The Hebrew word, to miss a mark, said of slingers or archers (Judges 20:16). The Hebrew for "habitation" primarily means the fold for cattle; and for, "visit," often to take an account of, 'to number." Whenever you survey your flock you will find none missing. 'Peace' is the common Eastern salutation; including inward and outward prosperity.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(24) Sin.—The word rendered “sin” literally means also to miss the mark, as in Judges 20:16, and that is probably its meaning here: Thou shalt visit thy dwelling-place, and miss nothing, since one does not see very clearly why the promise of not sinning is connected with visiting the habitation or fold.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And thou shalt know that thy tabernacle shall be in peace; and thou shalt visit thy habitation, and shalt not sin.
thou shalt know
18:6,15,21; 21:7-9; 1 Samuel 30:3; Isaiah 4:5,6
thy tabernacle, etc
or, peace is thy tabernacle.
Psalms 25:13
thou shalt visit
Deuteronomy 28:6; Psalms 91:10; 121:7,8
sin
or, err.
Psalms 107:4,40
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 2:9 - will keep;  Isaiah 41:3 - safely

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 5:24". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-5.html.