Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 5:27

"Behold this; we have investigated it, and so it is. Hear it, and know for yourself."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Faith;   Happiness;   Righteous;   Wisdom;  
Dictionaries:
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Eliphaz (2);  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Lo this, we have searched it - What I have told thee is the sum of our wisdom and experience on these important points. These are established maxims, which universal experience supports.

Know - understand, and reduce them to practice for thy good. Thus ends Eliphaz, the Temanite, "full of wise saws and ancient instances;" but he miserably perverted them in his application of them to Job's case and character. They contain, however, many wholesome truths, of which the wise in heart may make a very advantageous practical use.

The predatory excursions referred to in Job 5:23; were not unfrequent among our own barbarous ancestors. An affecting picture of this kind is drawn by Shakespeare, from Holinshed's Chronicles, of the case of Macduff, whose castle was attacked in his absence by Macbeth and his wife and all his children murdered. A similar incident was the ground of the old heroic ballad of Hardicanute. When the veteran heard that a host of Norwegians had landed to pillage the country, he armed, and posted to the field to meet the invading foe. He slew the chief in battle, and routed his pillaging banditti. While this was taking place, another party took the advantage of his absence, attacked his castle, and carried off or murdered his lovely wife and family; which, being perceived on his return by the war and age-worn chief, is thus affectingly described by the unknown poet: -

Loud and chill blew the westlin wind, Sair beat the heavy shower,

Mirk grew the nicht eir Hardyknute Wan neir his stately tower:

His tower that us'd with torches bleise To shine sae far at night,

Seim'd now as black as mourning weid, Nae marvel, sair he sich'd.

"Thair's nae light in my lady's bowir, Thair's nae light in my hall;

Nae blink shynes round my Fairly fair, Nor ward stands on my wall.

"What bodes it, Thomas! Robert! say?" Nae answer - speaks their dreid;

"Stand back, my sons, I'll be your gyde;" But bye they pass'd with speid.

"As fast I haif sped owr Scotland's foes" There ceis'd his brag of weir.

Sair schamt to mind ocht but his dame, And maiden Fairly fair.

Black feir he felt; but what to feir He wist not yet with dreid;

Sair schook his body, sair his limbs, And all the warrior fled.

The ending of this poem is lost; but we here see that the castle of Hardicanute was surprised, and his family destroyed, or carried off, while he and his sons had been employed in defeating the invading Norwegians. Thank God! civilization, the offspring of the spread of Christianity, has put an end to these barbarous practices among us; but in the East, where Christianity is not, they flourish still. Britons! send out your Bible and your missionaries to tame these barbarians; for whom heathenism has done nothing, and the Koran next to nothing. Civilization itself, without the Bible, will do as little; for the civilized Greeks and Romans were barbarians, fell and murderous; living in envy and malice, hateful, hating one another, and offering hundreds at a time of human victims to their ruthless deities. Nothing but Christianity ever did, or even can, cure these evils.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Lo this - All this that I have said; the truth of all the remarks which I have made.

We have searched it - We have by careful observation of the course of events come to these conclusions. These are our views of the providence of God, and of the principles of his government, as far as we have had the opportunity of observing, and they are well worthy of your attention. The sentiments in these two chapters indicate close and accurate observation; and if we think that the observation was not always wholly accurate, or that the principles were carried further than facts would warrant, or that Eliphaz applied them with somewhat undue severity to the case of Job, we are to remember that this was in the infancy of the world, that they had few historical records, and that they had no written revelation. If they were favored with occasional revelations, as Eliphaz claimed (Job 4:12 ff), yet they were few in number, and at distant intervals, and the divine communications pertained to but few points.

Though it may without impropriety be maintained that some of the views of Eliphaz and his friends were not wholly accurate, yet we may safely ask, Where among the Greek and Roman sages can views of the divine government be found that equal these in correctness, or that are expressed with equal force and beauty? For profound and accurate observation, for beauty of thought and sublimity of expression, the sage of Teman will not fall behind the sages of Athens; and not the least interesting thing in the contemplation of the book of Job, is the comparison which we are almost of necessity compelled to make between the observations on the course of events which were made in Arabia, and those which were made by the philosophers of the ancient pagan world. Is it improper to suppose that one design of this book was to show how far the human mind could go, with the aid of occasional revelations on a few points, in ascertaining the principles of the divine administration, and to demonstrate that, after all, the mind needed a fuller revelation to enable man to comprehend the truths pertaining to the kingdom of God? “Hear it for thy good.” Margin, as in Hebrew “thyself.” These principles are such that they are of importance for you to understand and to apply.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-5.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 5:27

Lo this, we have searched it, so it is; hear It, and know thou it for thy good.

“So it is”

Thus closed a forcible speech by Eliphaz the Temanite; it may be called his “summing up.” He virtually says, “What I have testified in the name of my friends is no dream of theirs. Upon this matter we are specialists; and bear witness to truth which we have made the subject of research and experience. Lo this, we have searched it, so it is; hear it, and know thou it for thy good.” By this declaration he sets forth his teaching with authority, and presses it home. He persuades Job to consider what he had said, for it was no hasty opinion, but the ripe fruit of experience. I shall not follow Eliphaz; I am only going to borrow his closing words, and use them in reference to Gospel testimony; which is to us a thing known and searched out.

I. To begin with, these words may well describe the qualification of the teacher. He will be poorly furnished if he cannot run in the line which Eliphaz draws in the words of our text.

1. He should have an intimate knowledge of his subject. How can he teach what he does not know? When we come to talk about God, and the soul, and sin, and the precious blood of Jesus, and the new birth, and holiness and eternal fife, the speaker who knows nothing about these things personally must be a poor driveller. A blind man, who is teaching others about colour and vision? A preacher of an unknown God? A dead man sent with messages of life? You are in a strange position.

2. I must add that he should have a personal experience of it, so that he can say, “Lo this, we have searched it, so it is.” It is unseemly that an ignorant man should keep a school. It is not meet that a dumb man should teach singing. Shall an impenitent man preach repentance? Shall an unbelieving man preach faith? Shall an unholy man preach obedience to the Divine will? He who would learn to plough, must not be apprenticed to one who never turned a furrow. We must know the Lord, or we cannot teach His way.

3. What is wanted in a successful teacher is a firm conviction of the truth of these things, growing out of his having tested them for himself. He must say, with emphasis, “So it is.” The Lord’s Word must be true. Why do you “hope” about it? Believe it and enjoy it. But people will go hoping and hoping and limping; as if to be lame were the proper thing. A ministry of hesitation must be ruinous to souls. When Divine truth is held fast, then let it be held forth, and not till then.

4. Once more a needful qualification for a teacher of the Word is earnestness and goodwill to the hearer. We must implore each one of our hearers to give earnest heed. We must cry to him with our whole heart, “Hear it, and know thou it for thy good.” Without love, there can be no real eloquence. The great Saviour’s heart is love, and those who are to be saviours for Him must be of a loving spirit. True love will do the work when everything else has failed. Knowledge of our subject avails not without love to our hearers. There are three ways of knowing, but only one sort is truly worth the having. Many labour to know, merely that they may know. These are like misers, who gather gold that they may count it, and hide it away in holes and corners. This is the avarice of knowledge. Such knowledge turns stagnant, like water shut up in a close pond--above mantled with rank weed, and below putrid, or full of loathsome fife. A second class aspire to know that others may know that they know. To be reputed wise is the heaven of most mortals. One does not eat merely that others may know that you have had your dinner, and one should not know merely to have it known that you know. The third kind of knowledge is the one worth having. Learn to know that you may make other people know. This is not the avarice but the commerce of knowledge. Acquire knowledge that you may distribute it. Light the candle, but put it not under a bushel. Be taught that you may teach. This trading is gainful to all who engage in it.

II. The argument for the hearer. “Lo this, we have searched it, so it is.” The argument directed to the hearer is the experience of many, confirming the statement of one. “We have searched it, so it is.” I should like to bear my own personal witness to a few things about which I am fully persuaded. “Lo this, we have searched it, so it is.”

1. And my first witness is that sin is an evil and a bitter thing. I think I may speak for you and say, “We have searched this out, and we know that it is so.” We have seen sin prove injurious to our fellow men.

2. I wish to testify to the fact that repentance of sin, and faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, bring a wonderful rest to the heart, and work a marvellous change in the whole life and character.

3. Next, we beg to bear our witness to the fact that prayer is heard of God. God does hear prayer. We bear our witness to that fact with all our strength, and therefore we say about it, “Lo this, we have searched it, so it is; hear it, and know thou it for thy good.”

4. Another testimony we would like to bear, namely, that obedience to the Lord, though it may involve present loss, is sure to be the most profitable course for the believing man to take.

5. We beg to say that the old-fashioned Gospel is able to save men, and to arouse enthusiasm in their souls.

III. We have here the exhortation to the inquirer.

1. “This, we have searched it, so it is; hear it.” But oh, if you wish to be saved, hear the Gospel! Let nothing keep you away from God’s sanctuary, where the real Gospel is proclaimed. Hear it! If it is not preached exactly in the style which you would prefer, nevertheless, hear it. “Faith cometh by hearing.”

2. The next thing that he says is, “Know it.” Hear it and know it; go on hearing it until you know it. To know Christ is life eternal.

3. Our text means--know it in a particular way. “Know thou it for thy good.” The devil knows a great deal. He knows more than the most intelligent of us; but he knows nothing for his good. All that he knows sours into evil within his rebellious nature.

.

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 5:27". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-5.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Lo this, we have searched it,.... This is the concluding part of Eliphaz's first oration or speech to Job; and in order to engage his attention to it, observes, that what he had said was not his own single opinion, but the sentiment of the rest of his friends; and that it was the result of laborious and diligent investigation; that they had searched the records of former times, and inquired of ancient people, as well as had made the strictest observations on things during their course of life;

so it is; and the sum and amount of all was what he had declared, and which they had found to be sure and certain, the truth of the matter; that it is an undoubted truth, which should not be disputed and called in question, but to be held as a first principle, which was this; that wicked men are punished for their sins, and that good men are never greatly afflicted, at least not to such a degree as to be stripped of all the necessaries of life, and to be in a most desolate and perishing condition; and since this had been so thoroughly investigated by them, and such "a probatum est" was written upon it, he exhorts Job to

hear it; agree to it, believe it, receive it, and make a proper use of it, as he hoped he would:

and know thou it for thy good; or "for thyself"F19דע לך "scito tibi", Montanus, Mercerus, &c. ; take it to thyself, as belonging to thee, as suitable to thy case; apply it to thyself, learn some lessons from it, and make good use of it; which is what is proposed by all that has been said.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Lo z this, we have searched it, so it [is]; hear it, and know thou [it] for thy good.

(z) We have learned these points by experience, that God does not punish the innocent, that man cannot compare in justice with him, that the hypocrites will not prosper for long, and that the affliction which man sustains comes for his own sin.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

for thy good — literally, “for thyself” (Psalm 111:2; Proverbs 2:4; Proverbs 9:12).

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-5.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Lo this, we have searched it, so it is; hear it, and know thou it for thy good.

Searched — This is no rash or hasty conceit, but what both I and my brethren have learned by deep consideration, long experience, and diligent observation.

Know thou — Know it for thyself; (So the word is) with application to thy own case. That which we thus hear and know for ourselves, we hear and know for our good.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-5.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 5:27 Lo this, we have searched it, so it [is]; hear it, and know thou [it] for thy good.

Ver. 27. Lo this, we have searched it, so it is] We are sure that all this is true, and may be trusted to, for we have tried it; we have not it only by tradition, neither take we it up upon trust from others; but we believe and know, as Peter spake, John 6:69; we believe, and therefore speak it, as Paul (after David), 2 Corinthians 4:13, Psalms 116:10. Thou mayest write upon this whole chapter, as those ancients did upon their oracles, φεος, φεος, God, God; or as John the divine did upon his Revelation, "These sayings are faithful and true," Revelation 22:6. Vera tanquam ex tripode, As true as gospel, as we say. Those that take upon them to teach others should go upon sure ground, and be masters of what they teach: how else will they teach with authority? Those also that come to hear must strive to find out that which St Luke calleth the certainty of things, Luke 1:4, and not be led by conjectural suppositions, or the tenets of their teachers, but be fully persuaded, Job 5:1.

Hear it] With utmost attention of body, intention of mind, retention of memory and practice: else all is lost.

And know thou it for thy good] Make thy best use of this our diligence and experience so freely and friendly communicated unto thee. Let not all this that hath been spoken be spilt upon thee, but prove every whit as profitable to thee as I conceive it seasonable for thee. Some knowing men are not a button the better for all they know. The devils are full of objective knowledge; but they get no good by it; no more do graceless men, that draw not their knowledge into practice, but detain the truth in unrighteousness: it swimmeth in their heads, but sinketh not into their hearts; it maketh them giddy, as wine fuming all up into the head, but never coming at the heart to cheer it. Such a man may cast out devils, and yet be cast to the devil; he may go to hell with all his unprofitable knowledge; like as a bull with a coronet aud garland goes to the slaughter. Unless a man hear and know for himself, he shall find no more comfort of it than a man doth of the sun when it shineth not in his own horizon; or than a traveller doth of the fatness of a far country which he only passeth through, and taketh a view of. If therefore thou be wise, be wise for thyself, Proverbs 9:12. Let thy knowledge be not only apprehensive, but effective, illightening, but transforming, [2 Corinthians 3:18] discursive, but experimental and practical. "For thereby we know that we know him, if we keep his commandments," 1 John 2:3.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 5:27". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 5:27. Know thou it for thy good Attend thou, therefore, diligently; [ לךֶ דע dang lak;] know thou it for thyself; make application of it to thy own case;—know the original of the drawing. Heath.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, Eliphaz, confident in the goodness of his cause, defies Job to contradict his assertions.

1. He bids him appeal to God or man, and he will be silenced; call now to God, if there be any that will answer thee, and see if he will confute the vision that I have related; or call now to all the holy men of old, if there be any whose case corresponds with thine, so afflicted and yet innocent, and not a parallel will be found. And to which of the saints, or angels, wilt thou turn? either the celestial beings, who would reject his appeal of integrity, or the saints upon earth, whose circumstances and sentiments resembled his own; therefore the charge he brought must be true, that his insincerity was the cause of his sufferings. Note; (1.) There are in every age some living saints, sanctified by God's word and spirit; and, though the world use the word as a term of derision, it is a title of the highest honour, and true of every real believer, who is called to be a saint as much as Paul or John. (2.) It were indeed a strong proof of the badness of our state and temper, if we had the experience of all God's saints against us; but the experience of the saints is often pleaded by those who have it least on their side.

2. He asserts the ruin of the wicked as a truth that himself had often been witness to. Wrath killeth the foolish, or wicked, man; the wrath of God is revealed against him, or his own hasty spirit urges him on to his ruin; and this notwithstanding his momentary prosperity. I have seen the foolish taking root, but destruction awaited him. Suddenly I cursed his habitation, not wished him evil, but foresaw the curse impending over him: his children, the staff of his age, are far from safety, and they are crushed in the gate, buried in the ruins of their desolate houses, neither is there any to deliver them, neither God nor man interests himself in their behalf; whose harvest the hungry eateth up, so that their substance is consumed, and taketh it even out of the thorns, leaves none behind, even so much as a handful at the hedge-side; or though fenced in with thorns, break through and plunder it, and the robber swalloweth up their substance. In this description of the ruin of the foolish man, there is drawn an evident invidious parallel with Job's case, whose sudden afflictions, the death of his children, and the ruin of his substance by the robbers, Eliphaz would insinuate as a proof that he shared with the wicked in their afflictions, because he had joined them in their sins. Note; (1.) The indulgence of our vile passions often proves fatal to ourselves. (2.) The wrath of God, in time and eternity, assuredly rests on the sinner's head, however prosperous his circumstances may appear. (3.) The wicked man must be a silly one; how could he else, for the sake of a momentary pleasure, rush into everlasting pain.

2nd, It was the intention of Eliphaz, not to sink Job into despair, but first to lay bare his wound, and then apply the healing balm, suggesting arguments for resignation, and how to bear his burden profitably.

1. He directs him to the origin and cause of all his trouble: Although affliction cometh not forth of the dust, neither doth trouble spring out of the ground, as things fortuitous and accidental, or owing merely to second causes operating independent of God's agency (for no creature acts but under his providence and over-ruling power): yet man is born to trouble; since sin entered, the curse entered, and close as our shadow afflictions follow us; as the sparks fly upward, numerous as these, and the natural consequence of our fallen state; and this should reconcile us to suffering, and engage us to be humble for the sin which is the cause of it. Note; (1.) Fortune and chance are the creatures of heathenism and infidelity: we are assured, in God's word, that not a hair of our head falls to the ground without the divine knowledge, and the appointment or sufferance of God. (2.) The more we are acquainted with the sinfulness of our nature, the less reason shall we have to murmur under any affliction, since we must then acknowledge it to be less than our iniquity deserves.

2. He gives him advice how to behave himself: I would seek unto God, or, doubtless I do seek unto God; it is the method I myself take in my trials, and would recommend to you as doubtless the most proper and seasonable: and unto God would I, or do I commit my cause, in humble prayer and patient resignation, and then rest in hope. Note; We may safely commend what we have proved by experience to be good; and people of every age have found, that patient hope and believing prayer will not fail at last of bringing an answer of peace.

3. He enforces his admonition by considerations drawn from God's sovereign dominion, power, and equity: which doeth great things in the works of creation and providence; and unsearchable, beyond the deepest penetration of the wisest sages; marvellous things that excite our astonishment, and exceed our comprehension; and these without number; earth, air, and sea teem with wonders; every day new works of providence awaken our admiration; and the more we attempt to reason, the more we are lost in depths of wisdom unfathomable. How foolish then to dispute against God, and how much wiser to refer ourselves to him, who can do such wonders, and will do ever wisely! By his gracious providence, he sendeth the rain to water the earth; the poor and mourners, whose faces were black as it were with famine, see plenty restored, and themselves exalted from their low estate: such merciful assistance may they expect who wait upon him. But the crafty are disappointed in their schemes; their enterprizes prove abortive; their own snares entangle them, as birds in an evil net, and their precipitate counsels hurry them on to ruin. In the plainest circumstances they become infatuated, and fall from the meridian of prosperity into the deepest darkness of affliction, while the helpless servants of God, against whom their tongues were maliciously let loose, and whom their arm cruelly oppressed, are delivered, to the great disappointment of iniquity, and to the encouragement of the hope of the poor, who never trust in him and are confounded. The inference that Eliphaz would draw from hence is evident; that if Job thus humbly trusted in God, he would experience a like deliverance. Note; (1.) The wisest become fools, when they turn from God to trust in their own understanding. (2.) The deepest laid plots of men, or devils, need not trouble God's people; there is one who sitteth in the heavens that laughs them to scorn. (3.) They who have their tempers in lowliness conformed to their circumstances, will find him near at hand who will lift them up, and restore comfort to the mourners. (4.) In the worst of times we should never quit our hope in God; for he is faithful that hath promised. (5.) Though the mouth of malignity is now open, and the hand of the oppressors heavy on God's people, their arm shall soon be broken, and their lips sealed up in everlasting silence.

3rdly, Eliphaz draws his speech to a conclusion, and closes it with a view of the great and precious promises that would attend Job, if his mind were but conformed to his circumstances.

1. He warns him not to despise the chastening of the Almighty; though the draught be bitter, it must not be rejected, because it is the means of health: it is the rod of the Almighty, before which he may not proudly disdain to bow: it is lifted up with the most gracious design of fatherly correction, therefore not to be slighted, but submitted to with patience, heard with reverence, Micah 6:9 and the cup of affliction to be drank with cheerfulness. Note; In every affliction, our chief concern should be, not the removal, but the due improvement of it.

2. He supports his advice by stating the blessed effects which would flow from it. Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth by his word, or providences; it is the proof of his regard, and designed to work eminently for our good; it serves to wean the heart from earth, and urge the soul to seek more diligently the true and abiding joys of glory. The same hand also that wounds can heal, and will, no doubt, when the design of his visitation is answered. The length or repetition of our troubles should not discourage us; for out of them all God will deliver his servants; and in them preserve the souls of his saints from evil, that the wicked one touch them not. Though pale famine stalk ghastly through the land, or horrid war with garments rolled in blood spread desolations around; though wild beasts of the desart howl and threaten to devour, or men more savage than these beasts bite with malignant teeth, and, with the scourge of the tongue, poisonous as the serpent's sting, strive to infuse their baneful calumnies, God will preserve his faithful people; they shall be fed in the time of dearth, and covered from danger under the wing of the Almighty; the creatures shall be in league with them not to hurt them; and, secure, they shall mock at the impotent malice of their foes: their houses shall be in peace; their families united in love, and defended from the evil of sin and trouble; they shall go in and out under the divine blessing, and piety and prosperity crown all their labours; their posterity shall be great and numerous; and, after beholding them fixed in comfort and affluence, they shall go down to their graves crowned with length of days, riches, and honour; and, ripe for glory as the sheaf is in the day of harvest, be gathered into the bosom of God's everlasting love. Note; (1.) When God wounds his faithful people, he heals, binds up their hearts with present divine consolations, and opens a way for them to escape out of every temptation; no wound so deep which he cannot cure. (2.) They who have God for their confidence may defy their foes, and triumph even in the jaws of death. (3.) A peaceable abode is a signal mercy; but the distinguishing blessing is, to be kept from sin. (4.) It is a comfort to gracious parents, to see their children's prosperity in the world, but most of all to behold their piety, for that alone can insure the abiding good. (5.) Age is ripening us for the grave; are we also ripening for glory, filled with grace as with years, full of good fruits, and bending with cheerfulness into the hands of the harvest-man, as ready for the storehouse of God?

3. He begs Job's serious consideration: Lo! attend to what I have spoken, as the result of sound and deep experience; this we have searched, it is our joint sentiments, and so it is approved by the concurring testimony of all God's people: hear it then with reverence and submission, and know thou it for thy good, or thyself, apply it to thine own case, and receive the blessing which this discourse was intended to convey. Note; Great truths deserve solemn attention; and from every sermon that we hear, our future conduct should make our profiting manifest.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 5:27". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-5.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

(27) Lo this, we have searched it, so it is; hear it, and know thou it for thy good.

Eliphaz here concludes his sermon, leaves it as all preachers must, to the mind and conscience, to judge its truth!

REFLECTIONS

THE best improvement that we can make under GOD the HOLY GHOST, from this discourse of the man of Timan, is to consider the whole scope of his reasoning, not as it concerns Job only, but all the exercised family of the faithful upon earth. As far as we have already advanced, in the history of this patriarch's sufferings, we trace enough to discover some of the sweet designs of the LORD in his affliction! GOD will manifest that Satan's charge is false. Job's integrity shall be proved. And therefore Job's integrity must be brought to the trial. The enemy charged him with hypocrisy. And Job's friends are endeavoring to prove it, During the sharp exercise the LORD will sustain him.

Reader! remark from what we have already seen in Job's history, that a suitableness of mind and heart under trial, is one of the highest attainments of faith. There is little or no exercise for faith, when all things go well. When the LORD in his providence, neither suffers our desires to be crossed, nor thwarts our wishes; then it is smooth sailing down the stream of life. But if GOD raiseth a storm; permits the enemy to send wave after wave, and when we cry the LORD gives no answer, but seemingly stands aloof from our prayers; then in the prospect of shipwreck, still to hang on and trust GOD, when we cannot trace him; this is the patience of the saints!

But oh! precious JESUS, how sweet is it to eye thee, thou blessed Author and Finisher of faith in such moments. While we look at thee what strength doth it induce! when we lose sight of thee, what poor creatures the best of thy servants are! Oh! LORD! I would say for myself and Reader, give us to believe! help thou our unbelief.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-5.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

It is not my single opinion, but my brethren concur with me, as thou wilt hear from their own mouths. This is no rash or hasty conceit, but what we have learned by deep consideration and hard study, long experience and diligent observation, both of God’s word, so far as he hath been pleased to reveal himself, and of the course and methods of his providence and dealing with men in the world.

Know thou it; for to us thou seemest by thy words and carriage to be wholly, or in a great part, ignorant of these things. For thy good; let the advantage which will come unto thee by following this counsel remove thy prejudice against it.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 5:27". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

27.We have searched it — He thus commits the two other friends to the sentiments he has expressed, and they by their silence assent. Job assumes this in his reply.

For thy good — As in the margin, for thyself. These principles, proved by experience, Job may take to himself. The frigid want of sympathy accompanies the speech to its bitter end. The galled jade may wince — Job is in the hands of a righteous God, let him suffer. “Eliphaz blames Job for his murmuring, and bids him receive his affliction with a recognition of human sinfulness and the divine purpose for good. Thus the controversy begins.” — Delitzsch.

 

 

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-5.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 5:27. Lo this, we have searched out — It is not my single opinion, but my brethren concur with me, as thou wilt hear from their own mouths. And it is no rash or hasty conceit, but what we have learned by deep consideration, long experience, and diligent observation. Know thou it for thy good — Know it for thyself, (so the word is,) make application of it to thine own case. That which we thus hear and know for ourselves, we hear and know for our good.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 5:27". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-5.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Which thou. Septuagint, "And what we have heard: but do thou reflect with thyself what thou hast done." (Haydock) --- What had been revealed to Eliphaz was very true. Yet his conclusions were unwarrantable. (Calmet) --- How confidently does he speak of his own knowledge, and how great must have been his disappointment, when God condemned him of folly, and sent him to be the prayers of that very man whom he now considered as a wretched sinner! (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-5.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"Behold this; we have investigated it, and so it is. Hear it, and know for yourself": He smugly ends his first speech. "He seemed to have said, "I have the truth, so you might as well face up to it, and act accordingly"" (Zuck p. 35).

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-5.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

thy good = thyself.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Lo this, we have searched it, so it is; hear it, and know thou it for thy good.

Searched it ... for thy good - literally, for thyself. "The works of the Lord are great, sought out of all them that have pleasure therein" (Psalms 111:2); "If thou be wise, thou shalt be wise for thyself" (Proverbs 9:12; Proverbs 2:4).

Remarks:

(1) The murmurer against God has no refuge in heaven or earth to flee to: none of the heavenly beings will espouse (1) The murmurer against God has no refuge in heaven or earth to flee to: none of the heavenly beings will espouse his cause, as though he were harshly and wrongfully dealt with.

(2) There is but one Advocate for us with the Father, whose only plea is His own, not our, righteousness (1 John 2:1-2). He pleads for those of us alone who, instead of justifying, condemn themselves as guilty before God, and rely solely on the propitiation for our sins offered on the cross by "Jesus Christ the righteous."

(3) The fretful complainer is his own executioner. Impatience and passion are as foolish as they are sinful.

(4) The ungodly may for a time flourish like a firmly rooted tree; but sudden destruction will come upon him when he least expects it (1 Thessalonians 5:3); assuredly in the eternal world, and often even in this life. God visits the sin of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation.

(5) The cause of men's troubles is often to be locked for, not so much in external things, as in themselves. Men reap as they sow (Job 4:8). But we are not, like Eliphaz, to press this principle so far as to attribute each calamity to some special sinfulness in the sufferer. God, when He sends adversity, has often other objects in view besides retribution for particular sin. In the case of His people, as Job, one purpose of chastisement is to manifest character, in order that their blemishes, heretofore latent, may be opened out; then, stripped of all self-righteousness, and justifying God in all His dealings, they learn to rest solely on the mercy of God in Christ; and faith and patience have thus their perfect work.

(6) All things are ordered in time and eternity for the good of them that love God. If God wound them for a time, the hand that wounds will also make whole. Howsoever many may be the troubles of the godly man, the Lord will deliver him out of them all. He will either avert every temporal calamity, or else overrule it to His people's good. When a man's ways please the Lord, He maketh His enemies to be at peace with him. The believer has peace with the world (as much as lieth in him, Romans 12:18) - peace in his home-above all, peace in his conscience and with his God (Romans 5:1; John 14:27). And when the great change comes he is not cut off prematurely: he comes to his grave in a full age, in his due season; the grain is found full in the ear; the heavenly Husbandman waits not a moment longer. "But when the fruit is brought forth, immediately He putteth in the sickle, because the harvest is come" (Mark 4:29).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(27) So it is.—It is the boastful confidence of Eliphaz which is so hard to bear. He speaks as though Job’s experience were as nothing to his. “This is mine: take it to thyself, and make it thine.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Lo this, we have searched it, so it is; hear it, and know thou it for thy good.
we have searched
8:8-10; 12:2; 15:9,10,17; 32:11,12; Psalms 111:2; Proverbs 2:3-5
for thy good
Heb. for thyself.
22:2; Deuteronomy 10:13; Proverbs 9:12 Reciprocal: Job 6:24 - Teach me;  Job 13:1 - ear;  Proverbs 24:30 - went

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 5:27". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-5.html.