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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 12:28

"Father, glorify Your name." Then a voice came out of heaven: "I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again."

Adam Clarke Commentary

Father, glorify thy name - By the name of God is to be understood himself, in all his attributes: his wisdom, truth, mercy, justice, holiness, etc., which were all more abundantly glorified by Christ's death and resurrection, (i.e. shown forth in their own excellence), than they had ever been before. Christ teaches here a lesson of submission to the Divine will. Do with me what thou wilt, so that glory may redound to thy name. Some MSS. read, Father, glorify my name: others, glorify thy Son.

Then came there a voice from heaven, etc. - The following is a literal translation of Calmet's note on this passage, which he has taken from Chrysostom, Theodoret, Theophylact, and others: "I have accomplished my eternal designs on thee. I have sent thee into the world to make an atonement for the sin of the world, and to satisfy my offended justice. I will finish my work. Thou shalt shed thy blood upon the cross. My glory is interested in the consummation of thy sacrifice. But, in procuring my own glory, I shall procure thine. Thy life and thy death glorify me: I have glorified thee by the miracles which have accompanied thy mission; and I will continue to glorify thee at thy death, by unexampled prodigies, and thy resurrection shall be the completion of thy glory and of thy elevation."

Christ was glorified:

  1. By the prodigies which happened at his death.
  • In his resurrection.
  • In his ascension, and sitting at the right hand of God.
  • In the descent of the Holy Ghost on the apostles. and
  • 5. In the astonishing success with which the Gospel was accompanied, and by which the kingdom of Christ has been established in the world. 2 Corinthians 2:14.


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    Bibliography
    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 12:28". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-12.html. 1832.

    Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

    Glorify thy name - The meaning of this expression in this connection is this: “I am willing to bear any trials; I will not shrink from any sufferings. Let thy name be honored. Let thy character, wisdom, goodness, and plans of mercy be manifested and promoted, whatever sufferings it may cost me.” Thus Jesus showed us that God‘s glory is to be the great end of our conduct, and that we are to seek that, whatever sufferings it may cost us.

    I have both glorified it - The word “it” is not here in the original, but it is not improperly supplied by the translators. There can be no doubt that when God says here that he had glorified his name, he refers to what had been done by Christ, and that this was to be understood as an attestation that he attended him and approved his work. See John 12:30. He had honored his name, or had glorified him, by the pure instructions which he had given to man through him; by the power displayed in his miracles; by proclaiming his mercy through him; by appointing him to be the Messiah, etc.

    Will glorify it again - By the death, the resurrection, and ascension of his Son, and by extending the blessings of the gospel among all nations. It was thus that he sustained his Son in view of approaching trials; and we may learn:

    1.that God will minister grace to us in the prospect of suffering.

    2.that the fact that God will be honored by our afflictions should make us willing to hear them.

    3.that whatever was done by Christ tended to honor the name of God. This was what he had in view. He lived and suffered, not for himself, but to glorify God in the salvation of men.


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    Bibliography
    Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-12.html. 1870.

    Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

    Father glorify thy name. There came therefore a voice out of heaven, saying, I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again.

    Three times God spoke out of heaven during the ministry of Jesus: here, at the baptism, and at the transfiguration (Mark 1:11; 9:7, and parallels). The Jews are said to have regarded thunder as an echo of the voice of God; but, "In all four Gospels, it is no mere echo of God's voice that is heard, but the direct speaking of the Father to the Son."[17]

    Glorify thy name ... Offered in the emotional tension arising from Jesus' consciousness that his "hour" was at hand, this prayer is surprising in that it has no petition for himself, but only for the glory of the Father's name.

    I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again ...

    Christ had glorified God by his ministry among the Jews, and he was now to glorify him by his death for all men, and by the gradual spread of the gospel among all nations.[18]

    [17] Alan Richardson, op. cit., p. 153.

    [18] Alvah Hovey, op. cit., p. 255.


    Copyright Statement
    James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

    Bibliography
    Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-12.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    Father, glorify thy name,.... The perfections of his nature, particularly his justice and holiness, meaning in himself; by his sufferings and death; intimating hereby, that his Father's glory was what he had in view, and that the securing of that would give him an infinite pleasure amidst all his sorrows. The Arabic version, and Nonnus, read "glorify thy Son", as in John 17:1, and the Ethiopic version takes in both, "glorify thy name, and thy Son": and indeed, what glorifies the one, glorifies the other; see John 13:31.

    Then came there a voice from heaven; as at his baptism and transfiguration, and which came from the Father, and was an articulate one, and what the Jews call "Bath Kol", or "the daughter of the voice":

    saying, I have both, glorified it; meaning in the incarnation, ministry, obedience and miracles of Christ; and particularly in that late one in raising Lazarus from the dead:

    and will glorify it again; by supporting him under, and carrying him through his sufferings and death, and by raising him from the dead, and setting him at his own right hand.


    Copyright Statement
    The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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    Bibliography
    Gill, John. "Commentary on John 12:28". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-12.html. 1999.

    Geneva Study Bible

    Father, d glorify thy name. Then came there a voice from heaven, [saying], I have both glorified [it], and will glorify [it] again.

    (d) So then the Father's glory is Christ's glory.

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    Bibliography
    Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 12:28". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-12.html. 1599-1645.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

    Father, glorify thy name — by a present testimony.

    I have both glorified it — referring specially to the voice from heaven at His baptism, and again at His transfiguration.

    and will glorify it again — that is, in the yet future scenes of His still deeper necessity; although this promise was a present and sublime testimony, which would irradiate the clouded spirit of the Son of man.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
    This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-12.html. 1871-8.

    John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

    28. Father, glorify thy name. Then came there a voice from heaven, saying, I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again.

    [I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again.] This petition of our Saviour's, "Father, glorify thy name," was of no light consequence, when it had such an answer from heaven by an audible voice: and what it did indeed mean we must guess by the context. Christ, upon the Greeks' desire to see him, takes that occasion to discourse about his death, and to exhort his followers, that from his example they would not love their life, but by losing it preserve it to life eternal. Now by how much the deeper he proceeds in the discourse and thoughts of his approaching death, by so much the more is his mind disturbed, as himself acknowledgeth, verse 27.

    But whence comes this disturbance? It was from the apprehended rage and assault of the devil. Whether our Lord Christ, in his agony and passion, had to grapple with an angry God, I question: but I am certain he had to do with an angry devil. When he stood, and stood firmly, in the highest and most eminent point and degree of obedience, as he did in his sufferings, it doth not seem agreeable that he should then be groaning under the pressures of divine wrath; but it is most agreeable he should under the rage and fury of the devil. For,

    I. The fight was now to begin between the serpent and the seed of the woman, mentioned Genesis 3:15, about the glory of God and the salvation of man. In which strife and contest we need not doubt but the devil would exert all his malice and force to the very uttermost.

    II. God loosed all the reins, and suffered the devil without any kind of restraint upon him to exercise his power and strength to the utmost of what he either could or would, because he knew his champion Christ was strong enough, not only to bear his assaults, but to overcome them.

    III. He was to overcome, not by his divine power, for how easy a matter were it for an omnipotent God to conquer the most potent created being; but his victory must be obtained by his obedience, his righteousness, his holiness.

    IV. Here then was the rise of that trouble and agony of Christ's soul, that he was presently to grapple with the utmost rage of the devil; the divine power in the mean time suspending its activity, and leaving him to manage the conflict with those weapons of obedience and righteousness only.

    It was about this, therefore, that that petition of our Saviour and the answer from heaven was concerned: which may be gathered from what follows, verse 31, "Now shall the prince of this world be cast out."

    "Now is my soul troubled (saith he), and what shall i say? It is not convenient for me to desire to be saved from this hour; for this very purpose did I come: that therefore which I would beg of thee, O Father, is, that thou wouldst glorify thy name, thy promise, thy decree, against the devil, lest he should boast and insult."

    The answer from heaven to this prayer is, "I have already glorified my name in that victory thou formerly obtaindest over his temptations in the wilderness; and I will glorify my name again in the victory thou shalt have in this combat also."

    Luke 4:13; "When the devil had ended all the temptations, he departed from him for a season." He went away baffled then: but now he returns more insolent, and much more to be conquered.

    And thus now, the third time, by a witness and voice from heaven, was the Messiah honoured according to his kingly office; as he had been according to his priestly office when he entered upon his ministry at his baptism, Matthew 3:17; and according to his prophetic office when he was declared to be he that was to be heard, Matthew 17:5, compared with Deuteronomy 18:15.


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    Bibliography
    Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on John 12:28". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/john-12.html. 1675.

    People's New Testament

    Then came a voice from heaven, saying, I have both glorified it. At Gethsemane the angel came to strengthen him; here the Father's voice speaks in approval. Three times the Father's voice was heard from the sky: {first,} when Christ was buried in Jordan, a type of his own burial; {second,} when Moses and Elijah talked with him on the holy mount about his death; {third,} when he had his struggle of soul in view of death portrayed here, and triumphed.

    Will glorify it again. God had glorified his name by the wonders wrought by Jesus; he would glorify it by his resurrection, his exaltation, the scenes of Pentecost, and the triumphs of the church.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
    Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

    Bibliography
    Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 12:28". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-12.html. 1891.

    Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

    Father, glorify thy name (πατερ δοχασον σου το ονομαpater class="greek-hebrew">δοχαζω — doxason sou to onoma). First aorist (note of urgency) active imperative of πνευμαdoxazō and in the sense of his death already in John 12:16, John 12:23 and again in John 13:31; John 17:5. This is the prayer of the πσυχηpneuma (or σαρχpsuchē) as opposed to that of the ονομαsarx (flesh) in John 12:27. The “name” (πωνη εκ του ουρανουonoma) of God expresses the character of God (John 1:12; John 5:43; John 17:11). Cf. Matthew 6:9.

    A voice out of heaven (και εδοχασα και παλιν δοχασωphōnē ek tou ouranou). This was the Father‘s answer to the prayer of Jesus for help. See note on the Father‘s voice at the baptism of Jesus (Mark 1:11) and on the Father‘s voice at the transfiguration (Mark 9:7). The rabbis called the audible voice of God εδοχασαbath -δοχασωqol (the daughter of a voice).

    I have both glorified it and will glorify it again
    (kai edoxasa kai palin doxasō). This definite assurance from the Father will nerve the soul of Jesus for the coming ordeal. Cf. John 11:40 for edoxasa and John 13:31; John 17:5 for doxasō f0).


    Copyright Statement
    The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

    Bibliography
    Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-12.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

    Vincent's Word Studies

    Glorify ( δόξασον )

    (Wyc., clarify, as the Vulgate clarifca.)

    Name

    See on Matthew 28:19.


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    Bibliography
    Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-12.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

    Wesley's Explanatory Notes

    Father, glorify thy name. Then came there a voice from heaven, saying, I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again.

    Father, glorify thy name — Whatever I suffer. Now the trouble was over.

    I have glorified it — By thy entrance into this hour.

    And I will glorify it — By thy passing through it.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

    Bibliography
    Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 12:28". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-12.html. 1765.

    The Fourfold Gospel

    Father, glorify thy name1. There came therefore a voice out of heaven, [saying], I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again2.

    1. Father, glorify thy name. Having refused to ask for deliverance, Jesus prays that he may glorify the Father by suffering according to his original statement contained in John 12:23,24. Two two prayers are counterparts to the two offered in Gethsemane (Luke 22:42). The prayer here is the climax of the thought begun at John 12:23. Then that discipleship is so glorified (John 12:25,26), and this prayer shows that our Lord himself is glorified by the same rule.

    2. There came therefore a voice out of heaven, [saying], I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again. The Father had glorified his name in the Son. By words of commendation at his baptism (Mark 1:11) and at his transfiguration (Mark 9:7), and by the performance of miracles (John 11:40), and he would glorify it again by the preaching of the universal gospel, and by making Jesus head over all to the church and the final judge of all men.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

    Bibliography
    J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 12:28". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-12.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

    Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

    28.Father, glorify thy name. By these words he testifies, that he prefers the glory of the Father to all things else, and even neglects and disregards his own life. And the true regulation of all our desires is, to seek the glory of God in such a manner that all other things shall give way to it; for it ought to be reckoned by us an abundant recompense, leading us to endure patiently all that is vexatious or irksome.

    I have both glorified it. It is as if he had said, I will finish what I have begun; for God never leaveth the work of his hands imperfect as it is said, Psalms 138:8. But as it is the purpose of God to prevent the offense of the cross, he not only promises that the death of Christ will be glorious, but also mentions with commendation the numerous ornaments with which he had already adorned it.


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    Bibliography
    Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-12.html. 1840-57.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    28 Father, glorify thy name. Then came there a voice from heaven, saying, I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again.

    Ver. 28. Then came there a voice from heaven] God sometimes gives a sensible answer to the prayers of his people, as they are praying, or immediately after, as Daniel 9:21; Acts 4:31. And Luther, praying for the good success of God’s cause in Germany, came leaping out of his study, with Vicimus, vicimus, we counquer, we conquer, in his mouth.


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    Bibliography
    Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 12:28". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-12.html. 1865-1868.

    Sermon Bible Commentary

    John 12:28

    The craving of sinfulness is for self-glorification. The thirst of godliness is for the glory of God. He who sees God's Name and comprehends it, hears God's Name and understands it, looks at it and reads it, listens to God's Name and rejoices in it, and sees in his own name part of God's Name, will ever cry "Father, glorify Thy Name." And as those whom Jesus Christ leads and governs are saved from sin, and are taught to live according to godliness, this is the aspiration of their life.

    I. Jesus Christ not only shows us the Father, and reconciles us to the Father, but teaches us to seek His glory as the end of life and of salvation. When all, by Jesus Christ's teaching and leading, shall know God, this will be the prayer of all, from the least to the greatest. In studio and study, in factory and church, in peasant's cot and palace, in every place of work and recreation and association, you will hear "Father, glorify Thy Name." And while the seraphs cry "Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord Almighty," and the innumerable choir of angels sing, "Glory be to God most high," the distant voices of earth shall be heard, softly but sweetly, saying, "Father, glorify Thy Name."

    II. We may use our text (1) for self-examination. Jesus Christ said, at this crisis of His life and at every crisis, "Father, glorify Thy name." What have we said? What do we say? Have we not sometimes remained in Jerusalem to glorify our own name, instead of going to Nazareth to glorify our Father's name? (2) Let us seek the state of heart which the prayer expresses, and making the prayer our own, let us embody its spirit in our whole life. Be not much concerned about the length of your life, or the circumstances of your death; leaving yourself in God's hands, submit to His arrangement. "Father, glorify Thy name." Then, how Divine the peace which shall keep the heart and mind, and how Godlike the rest which shall possess our soul. All that is within us shall be in sweet accord, the intellect and the heart, the reason and the passions. Our eye will be single, and our whole body full of light. With many things to do, at but one thing shall we aim. With many impulses, one great principle shall govern our will.

    S. Martin, Rain upon the Mown Grass, p. 374.


    References: John 12:28.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xvi., No. 909, vol. xxiv., No. 1391; S. Cox, Expositions, 2nd series, p. 312; A. Barry, Cheltenham College Sermons, p. 268; Homiletic Quarterly, vol. iv., p. 279; vol. v., p. 312; Homiletic Magazine, vol. xvii., p. 372; J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 8th series, p. 56.


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    Bibliography
    Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-12.html.

    Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

    28.] The glorifying the Name of the Father can only take place by the glorification of the Son; and this latter only by His death: so that this is the “ardor obedientiæ” triumphant.

    φωνή] This ‘voice’ can no otherwise be understood, than as a plain articulate sound, miraculously spoken, heard by all, and variously interpreted. So all the ancients, and the best of the modern expositors, Meyer, Stier, Luthardt, &c. On the saying of the crowd (John 12:29) has been built the erroneous and unworthy notion, that it was only thunder, but understood by the Lord and the disciples to mean as here stated. The Jewish Bath Kol has no applicability here.

    ἐδόξασα] In the manifestation hitherto made of the Son of God, imperfect as it was (see Matthew 16:16-17); in all O.T. type and prophecy; in creation; and indeed (Aug(168) in Joan. Tract. lii. 4) “antequam facerem mundum.”

    πάλιν is here no mere repetition, but an intensification of the δοξάζειν, a yet once more [: and this time fully and finally].


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    Bibliography
    Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 12:28". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-12.html. 1863-1878.

    Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

    John 12:28. πάτερ, Father) This appellation, lovingly repeated, agrees with the change in the subject of address to Him.— δόξασον) glorify, at any cost whatever to Me. The Father presently after accepts this petition; δοξάσω, I will glorify it. Already the ταραχή, troubling, John 12:27, is past.— σοῦ τὸ ὄνομα) Thy name of Father, which is in Me, as being Thy only-begotten Son: Exodus 23:21, “My name is in Him:” with which comp. Matthew 3:17. [At His baptism] “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased,” John 17:5, [At the transfiguration, the same testimony of the Father]. Therefore the voice from heaven thrice proclaimed the Son of God.— καὶ ἐδόξασα, I both have glorified) My name. See ch. John 17:5.— πάλιν δοξάσω, I will again glorify it) See the same passage, ch. John 17:5; John 17:1. By the verb, I have glorified, the entrance of Christ upon that hour is accepted [as also His entrance into the world, His sojourn in it being simultaneously implied.—V. g.]; by the verb, I will glorify, there is promised the glorification of the Father’s name through the glorification of Christ owing to His passion [suffering]. To the twofold speech of Jesus the twofold reply of the Father corresponds.


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    Bibliography
    Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 12:28". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-12.html. 1897.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    Father, glorify thy name; that is, make thy name glorious, make it to be known and famous over all the earth. A general petition, but such a one as all our particular requests must be reduced to, if they be according to the will of God. It is as much as, Father, do thine own will: for God is then glorified when his will is done. But it here signifies more: Not my will, but thy will be done. My flesh indeed saith save me from this hour; but, Father, do thy own will, let that be done concerning me which will most tend to make thy name renowned. Such a prayer never goes without an answer.

    Then came there a voice from heaven, &c.; the Lord caused a voice as from heaven to be heard. I have glorified it; I have by thee caused my glory to be published and proclaimed in the world, by thy preaching, by thy miracles; and I will perfect that which I have begun, I will glorify it again; thou shalt further glorify me by thy death, by thy resurrection from the dead, by the preaching of the gospel, and carrying it to the ends of the earth.


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    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 12:28". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-12.html. 1685.

    Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

    I have; in the attestations which he had borne to Christ the Messiah.

    And will; in the miracles at his death, resurrection, and ascension to glory.


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    Bibliography
    Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-12.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

    Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

    28. ἦλθεν οὖν. There came therefore, i.e. in answer to Christ’s prayer. There can be no doubt what S. John wishes us to understand;—that a voice was heard speaking articulate words, that some could distinguish the words, others could not, while some mistook the sounds for thunder. To make the thunder the reality, and the voice and the words mere imagination, is to substitute an arbitrary explanation for the Evangelist’s plain meaning. For similar voices comp. that heard by Elijah (1 Kings 19:12-13); by Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 4:31); at Christ’s Baptism (Mark 1:11) and Transfiguration (Mark 9:7); at S. Paul’s Conversion (Acts 9:4; Acts 9:7; Acts 22:9), where it would seem that S. Paul alone could distinguish the words, while his companions merely heard a sound (see on Acts 9:4); and the mixed φωναὶ καὶ βρονταί of the Apocalypse (John 4:5, John 8:5, John 16:18). One of the conditions on which power to distinguish what is said depends is sympathy with the speaker.

    ἐδόξασα. In all God’s works from the Creation onwards, especially in the life of Christ; δοξάσω, in the death of Christ and its results.


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    Bibliography
    "Commentary on John 12:28". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/john-12.html. 1896.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    28. Father, glorify thy name—His spirit now rises, in the greatness of its victory, into glorious sympathy with the Father, and the voice of the Father answers. The voice declares that as the Father has glorified him in the past, so will he glorify him in the future. Not only in the past eternity of the Son with the Father, and in his past life of human suffering, has there been a true glorification, but there shall be no cessation here on the brink of death. On the cross, through the valley of death, through the resurrection even, the shame shall be glory, and all shall redound to a glory eternal.


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    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-12.html. 1874-1909.

    Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

    ‘Then a voice came from Heaven, “I have glorified it, and I will glorify it again”.’

    The very coming of Jesus, and His powerful ministry, have glorified the Father’s name. We beheld His glory, glory as of the only son of the Father, full of grace and truth (John 1:14). His signs and wonders have revealed the Father’s glory (John 11:4). But what was to come would bring, if possible, even greater glory, for it would be glory achieved through suffering. So Jesus need not be over-concerned about whether it will glorify God’s Name (i.e. God Himself), for God assures Him that He has already glorified it through His presence on earth, and that through what is to come the glory of God would be accomplished in even greater measure.

    The Gospels record three instances of God responding with a voice from Heaven. The other two were at Jesus' baptism (Matthew 3:17; Mark 1:11; Luke 3:21-22) and at the transfiguration (Matthew 17:5; Mark 9:7; Luke 9:35), thus a voice from Heaven came at the commencement of the revelation of His glory, at its fullest manifestation, and here as a divine seal on the revelation of His glory in death and resurrection.


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    Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-12.html. 2013.

    Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

    John 12:28. Father, glorify thy name. ‘Let Thy glory shine forth in Thy name, in Thy character, as Father and in all that is involved in establishing Thy fatherly relation to men.’

    There came therefore a voice out of heaven, saying, I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again. The answer is a voice from heaven which is supposed (John 12:29) by some to be thunder, by others to be that of an angel. Both these suppositions disclose the character of the voice. It was loud and terrible, a voice of awe and majesty. Such is always the meaning of thunder both in the Old Testament and the New (Exodus 19:16; Job 26:14; Psalms 104:7; Revelation 4:5; Revelation 8:5; Revelation 11:19; Revelation 14:2; Revelation 19:6). Such also is the voice of an angel (Matthew 24:31; 1 Thessalonians 4:16; Revelation 5:2). The mixed ‘thunderings and voices,’ too, of the Apocalypse are an instructive comment on this voice, while the connection that it has with judgment is clearly indicated by our Lord Himself in John 12:30-31. If this was the manner of the voice, its contents must correspond, and it seems therefore altogether inappropriate to refer the first part of the words to the ministry of Jesus in Israel now drawing to its close, the second part to the approaching proclamation of salvation to the Gentiles. In reality these two things are one, and both of them are already ideally complete. The words rather express the unchangeableness of the purpose of Him ‘which is and which was and is to come,’ and intimate that the great work whereby God’s name was to be especially glorified would certainly, as resolved on in eternity, be accomplished.


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    Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-12.html. 1879-90.

    The Expositor's Greek Testament

    John 12:28. Therefore He prays: πάτερ δόξασόν σου τὸ ὄνομα. “Father, glorify Thy name.” Complete that manifestation of Thy holiness and love which through me Thou art making; complete it even at the cost of my agony.— ἦλθεν οὖν φωνὴδοξάσω. “There came, therefore, a voice out of heaven: I have both glorified it and will again glorify it.” However Jesus might seem in the coming days to be tossed on the sea of human passions, the Father was steadily guiding all to the highest end. The assurance that His death would glorify God was, of course, that which nerved Jesus for its endurance. He was not throwing His life away.


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    Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 12:28". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-12.html. 1897-1910.

    George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

    Father, glorify thy name, by my sufferings and death, as well as by many miracles that shall follow. A voice came from heaven, and so loud, that some there present compared it to thunder: and at the same time these words were heard: I have glorified it, thy name, and I will glorify it again, by a number of ensuing miracles at Christ's death, at his resurrection and ascension, as well as by all those miracles, which the apostles and disciples wrought afterwards. (Witham)


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    Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 12:28". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-12.html. 1859.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    heaven (singular) See note on Matthew 6:9, Matthew 6:10.

    I have, &c. The Father"s name was glorified in the wilderness by the Son"s victory over the "tempter". It was about to be glorified again by the final victory over Satan, in the contest beginning in Gethsemane and ending at the empty tomb.


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    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 12:28". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-12.html. 1909-1922.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    Father, glorify thy name. Then came there a voice from heaven, saying, I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again.

    Father, glorify thy name - by some present testimony.

    Then came there a voice from heaven, saying, I have both glorified it - referring specially to the voice from heaven at His Baptism, and again at His Transfiguration,

    And will glorify it again - that is, in the yet future scenes of His still deeper necessity; although even this very promise was a present and sublime testimony, which would irradiate the clouded spirit of the Son of Man.


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    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-12.html. 1871-8.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (28) Father, glorify thy name.—The pronoun “Thy” is emphatic. The Son’s will is one with that of the Father; the Son’s glory is in the glorifying the Father’s name. Comp. the opening clause of the Lord’s Prayer (Note on Matthew 6:9 et seq.) and in this context Note on John 12:23.

    Then came there a voice from heaven.—The words mean, not that a sound came from heaven, but that there was heard an articulate voice (comp. Note on John 3:8); and that St. John intended his readers to understand this cannot be questioned. He records here a fact parallel to those recorded by the other Evangelists at the Baptism (Matthew 3:17; Mark 1:11; Luke 4:22), and at the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:5; Mark 9:7; Luke 9:35), and parallel to that to which St. Luke and St. Paul have testified (Acts 9:4; Acts 22:9; Acts 26:14).

    I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again.—The words are without limit, extending to the whole past and to the whole future of God’s revelation of Himself to man. The only limit in the context is that this revelation is thought of as in the person of Christ. His words, His works. His life revealing the mercy and love and majesty of the Father, had to many hearts glorified the Father’s name. The wider future is at hand. The death and resurrection are to reveal God’s character, and therefore glorify the Father’s name to all the world. (Comp. Exodus 33:18-19; Exodus 34:5-7.)


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    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 12:28". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-12.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    Father, glorify thy name. Then came there a voice from heaven, saying, I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again.
    Father
    18:11; Matthew 26:42; Mark 14:36
    Then
    Matthew 3:17; 17:5; 2 Peter 1:17
    I have
    9:3; 11:4,40-44
    and will
    13:31,32; Isaiah 49:3-7; Ephesians 2:7; 3:10,21; Philippians 1:6-11; Revelation 5:9-14

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    Bibliography
    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 12:28". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-12.html.

    The Bible Study New Testament

    Father, bring glory to your name! In Gethsemane, an angel came to help him (Luke 22:43); here it is God who speaks. Three times God spoke from heaven during Christ's life: first, as Jesus is buried in baptism, symbolic of his own burial in the grave; second, at Transfiguration, when Moses and Elijah talk with him about his death; third, as his heart is troubled as he views the death he must die, and he honors God (compare John 12:23-24). And I will do so again. What Jesus has said means this: "Father, complete the demonstration of Your holiness and love, which you are making through me; complete it even at the cost of my agony (compare Hebrews 5:7-8)." God's answer is that he has brought glory to his name through Christ already, and that he will complete this visible demonstration, by the Cross, the Resurrection, the Ascension, Pentecost, and the victory of the messianic community!


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    Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 12:28". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-12.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

    Ver. 28. "Father, glorify Thy name. Then came there a voice from heaven, saying, I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again."

    God glorified His name by the works which Christ accomplished by His power, the resurrection of Lazarus being the last; and He would further glorify His name by prospering the suffering and death of Christ to the end of His glorification, and the spread of the kingdom of God over the whole earth. According to ver. 29 , the people heard thunder; and the question rises, whether the voice from heaven here was identical with the thunder, or whether there was some articulate voice distinct from the thunder. We decide in favour of the former view. There is no reason for assuming any voice shaped into words. Among the concomitants of the sound, immediately after "Glorify Thy name," the thunder did expressly say what John gives as its meaning, in connection with which it is not accidental, that after οὐρανοῦ the λέγουσα is wanting. 1 Samuel 12 presents the nearest analogy. There we have not a voice of the Lord separated from the thunder, but the thunder itself, following at an unusual time; and in immediate connection with the words of Samuel is the voice of the Lord. In ver. 18 of that chapter we read, "So Samuel called unto the Lord, and the Lord gave thunder (voices) and rain that day; and all the people greatly feared the Lord and Samuel," To describe thunder as the voice of the Lord, was only following the example of the Old Testament. Seven times it is so termed in one Psalm, Psalms 29. In Job 37:4 we read, "He thundereth with the voice;" and in Psalms 18:13, "The Lord also thundered in the heavens, and the Highest gave His voice:" comp. also 1 Samuel 12:17; Exodus 9:23. If John had intended that we should distinguish clearly between the thunder and the voice, he would have recorded both in separate terms. But there is no trace of any such distinction. On the contrary, John points expressly to the fact, that the thunder and the voice were one and identical. He records that the multitude heard the voice, and said that it thundered. Thus the people recognised the voice itself as thunder. There is not the slightest hint that the people heard less than what took place; that on account of the dulness of their ears they received the impression only of a rumbling noise, but did not apprehend the articulate voice. The multitude heard no articulate voice at all. Accordingly our Lord speaks, with allusion to what they had heard, of a voice, and exhorts them to lay that voice to heart. Thus the thunder spoke, even to those who heard nothing besides the thunder. John himself intimates that only thunder was there, when he uses the ἐδόξασα and δοξάσω, words used with allusion to thunder, and thunder as repeated, קולות. The name, son of thunder, given by Jesus to John, Mark 3:17, assumes and was based upon a sense of the symbolical language of nature. It is natural that the son of thunder should assign its true significance to the thunder, and that he should regard it less prosaically than, for instance, Stier, who remarks, "Mere thunder as the voice of the Father over His Son, were something altogether unworthy: with him who does not feel that, we have no disposition to argue." Certainly we do find in Scripture heavenly voices without thunder: comp. 1 Samuel 3; Matthew 3:17; Matthew 17:5; Acts 9:4; Acts 22:7. But we cannot find there any satisfactory instance of a connection between thunder and the articulated voice of God. In Exodus 19:19, we read that Moses spoke, and God answered with His voice; but according to ver. 16 , that voice was thunder; for the voices and the lightnings are there placed in juxtaposition. The idea of an articulate voice of God combined with the thunder at the giving of the law (praemissa tonitrua, quae attentionem quasi excitabant et deinceps articulatae voces), rests simply upon the expositor's caprice. The articulate voice there belongs to Moses alone, who comes forward as the interpreter of God, and is legitimated as such by the thunder. What Moses, according to Exodus 19:25, uttered, could only have been the same ten commandments which, in ch. John 20:1, are referred back to God, who sanctioned Moses, as His speaker and representative, by the "voices" of thunder. In Exodus 20:11), the people ask that Moses might speak to them alone, and not, as aforetime, with the accompaniment of the terrifying thunder-speech of God. True that in Deuteronomy 5:4 we read, "The Lord talked to you face to face in the mount, out of the midst of the fire." But how that is to be understood, that the Lord spoke only by the "voices" of thunder, while the words spoken were those of Moses, is plainly declared in ver. 5: "I stood between the Lord and you at that time, to show you the word of the Lord, saying." That Moses with reference to the ten commandments acted the part of an interpreter, is shown by the "saying," which is immediately followed by these ten commandments. In Revelation 10:4, the voices of thunder are introduced with specific meanings. But here also we may say there is a specific meaning: it is marked by the circumstances under which the thunder is introduced. If in that passage of the Apocalypse the thunder itself seems to speak, that belongs only to the vision. In all other Apocalyptic passages the thunder itself is the voice of God: ch. John 4:5, John 8:5, John 11:19, John 16:18. Throughout the whole of Scripture there does not occur a single instance in which articulate speech is introduced, concealed beneath the thunder.

    Thunder is in its nature, and the impression it produces upon every human heart, not merely in general a revelation of the glory of God, but a revelation of a threatening and terrifying character. Dread is the sentiment which always responds to it. This was the character it bore at the giving of the law. It proclaimed to the people that their God was a jealous God, who would inexorably visit their sins upon them. It presented to them the alternative between obedience and judgment; and it pointed to the great truth that whosoever should break the law must die. So also in Psalms 18 , 29. According to Psalms 29:7, the voice of the Lord divides with flames of fire; the thunder appears to be the symbolical threatening to the world, and therefore at the same time a symbolical promise to the Church of God oppressed by the world. In the Apocalypse, which it is obviously natural to compare with the Gospel of John, the thunder always has a polemical character; it has always a reference to terrible judgments, whether these are only threatened as to come, or actually accomplished: comp. ch. John 4:5, John 8:5, John 10:3, John 11:19, John 16:18. That here also the "voice" has not only an imposing, but also a threatening character; that it aims at the glorification of God's name by the subversion of the enemies of God and His Christ, is shown by ver. 31 , where the thunder is introduced as a premonition of judgment upon this world and its prince.

    Vers. 29 and 30 form an interlude. But Jesus immediately restores the connection. While in vers. 31 and 32 He more fully develops the meaning of the thunder. He comes to the thought which forms the direct answer to Philip and Andrew, the indirect answer to the Greeks: that the time was at hand when there should be closer relations with the Gentiles. That time, however, not being actually come, the wishes of the Greeks could not be granted. Had not the intervening words of the people been spoken, Jesus would at once have begun with ver. 31. Thus the close of the answer to the Gentiles is formally and primarily a part of the answer to the people.


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    Bibliography
    Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 12:28". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-12.html.


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