Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:22

Judas (not Iscariot) *said to Him, "Lord, what then has happened that You are going to disclose Yourself to us and not to the world?"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Apostles;   Fellowship;   Judas (Jude);   Righteousness;   Scofield Reference Index - Holy Spirit;   World-System;   Thompson Chain Reference - Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Holy Spirit;   Home;   Judas;   Love;   Love-Hatred;   Spirit;   The Topic Concordance - Abodes;   Coming;   Love;   Manifestation;   Obedience;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Judas;   Love;   Thaddaeus;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Comfort;   Counselor;   Faith;   Follow, Follower;   World;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Holy Ghost;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Jude;   Thaddaeus;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jude;   Thaddaeus;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Judas;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   God;   Holy Spirit;   John, Theology of;   Judas;   Thaddaeus;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Apostles;   Coming Again;   Death of Christ;   James ;   Judas;   Judas Iscariot (2);   Jude, the Lord's Brother;   Lebbaeus;   Manifestation;   Manuscripts;   Missions;   Promise (2);   Publishing ;   Questions and Answers;   Surname;   World ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Judas ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fruit;   Gallery;   Holy ghost;   Judas;   Pentecost;   Samuel;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Judas;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Jude,;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jude;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Judas;   Judas Barsabbas;   Judas, Not Iscariot;   Judas of James;   Jude, the Epistle of;   Trinity;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for October 25;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Judas - The same as Thaddeus and Lebbeus, the brother of James, and author of what is called the epistle of Jude.

How is it - Or, how can it be - τι γεγονεν, what is to happen? - on what account is it? Judas, who was probably thinking that the kingdom of Christ should extend over all the earth, wonders how this can be, and yet Christ manifest himself only to his disciples and not to the world, John 14:19. To this our Lord, in a more express manner than he had done before answers: -

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 14:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Judas saith unto him - This was the same as Lebbeus or Thaddeus. See Matthew 10:3. He was the brother of James, and the author of the Epistle of Jude.

How is it … - Probably Judas thought that he spake only of his resurrection, and he did not readily see how it could be that he could show himself to them, and not be seen also by others.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Judas (not Iscariot) saith unto him, Lord, what is come to pass that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?

Judas (not Iscariot) ... Goodspeed identified this Judas thus:

Thaddeus, as Judas the son of James is called in Matthew 10:13 and Mark 3:18, is credited to this day in Armenian tradition with having brought the gospel to Armenia with notable success.[17]

Thou wilt manifest ... and not unto the world ... The belief that Christ would be some kind of overpowering earthly Messiah persisted even among the Twelve, and even after the resurrection (Acts 1:6). Thaddeus' question here was strongly flavored with the ideas of Jesus' brothers (John 7:3,4), regarding a "manifestation" in Jerusalem. He did not understand that the death on the cross would be a manifestation before the whole world.

ENDNOTE:

[17] Edgar J. Goodspeed, The Twelve (New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1939), p. 30.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Judas saith unto him, not Iscariot,.... This was Judas Lebbaeus, whose surname was Thaddaeus, the same with Jude the apostle, the author of the epistle which bears his name; and is said to be "not Iscariot", to distinguish him from the betrayer. The question put by him, Lord,

how is it, τι γεγονεν, which answers to מאי דא, or מאי האי, or מהו, with the Talmudists, "what is this thou sayest"; what is the meaning of it? how can it be? or what is the reason of it,

that thou wilt manifest thyself to us, and not unto the world? arises either from ignorance of what Christ was speaking, imagining he meant a spectre, or some apparition of himself after his death, which should be visible to his disciples, and not to others; and how this could be, he wanted to know; or from that national prejudice which Judas and the rest of the apostles had given into, of a temporal kingdom of the Messiah, the glory of which should be visible to all the world; and therefore he wonders that he should talk of the manifestation of himself, only to some, or from an honest hearty desire that the glory of Christ might not be confined to a few only; but that the whole world might see it, and be filled with it: or rather from his modesty, and the sense he had of his own unworthiness, and of the rest of the apostles, to have such a peculiar manifestation of Christ to them, when they were no more deserving of it than others: the question is put by him with admiration and astonishment; and as not being able to give, or think of any other reason of such a procedure, but the amazing grace of Christ, his free favour and sovereign will and pleasure.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

7 Judas saith unto him, not Iscariot, Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?

(7) We must not ask why the gospel is revealed to some rather than to others, but we must rather take heed that we embrace Christ who is offered unto us, and that we truly love him, that is to say, that we give ourselves wholly to obeying him.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 14:22". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-14.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

not Iscariot — Beautiful parenthesis this! The traitor being no longer present, we needed not to be told that this question came not from him. But it is as if the Evangelist had said, “A very different Judas from the traitor, and a very different question from any that he would have put. Indeed [as one in Stier says], we never read of Iscariot that he entered in any way into his Master‘s words, or ever put a question even of rash curiosity (though it may be he did, but that nothing from him was deemed fit for immortality in the Gospels but his name and treason).”

how  …  manifest thyself to us, and not to the world — a most natural and proper question, founded on John 14:19, though interpreters speak against it as Jewish.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-14.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Not Iscariot (ουχ ο Ισκαριωτηςouch ho Iskariōtēs). Judas Iscariot had gone (John 13:30), but John is anxious to make it clear that this Judas (common name, two apostles also named James) was not the infamous traitor. He is also called Thaddaeus or Lebbaeus (Mark 3:17; Matthew 10:3) and the brother (or son) of James (Luke 6:16; Acts 1:13). This is the fourth interruption of the talk of Jesus (by Peter, John 13:36; by Thomas, John 14:5; by Philip, John 14:8; by Judas, John 14:22).

And not to the world (και ουχι τωι κοσμωιkai ouchi tōi kosmōi). Judas caught at the word εμπανιζωemphanizō in John 14:21 as perhaps a Messianic theophany visible to all the world as at the judgment (John 5:27.). He seems to suspect a change of plan on the part of Jesus (τι γεγονεν οτιti gegonen hoti = how has it happened that).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Judas

See on Thaddaeus, Mark 3:18.

Not Iscariot

The Rev. improves the translation by placing these words immediately after Judas. “He distinguishes the godly Judas, not by his own surname, but by the negation of the other's; marking at the same time the traitor as present again after his negotiation with the adversaries, but as having no sympathy with such a question” (Bengel).

How is it ( τί γέγ ονεν )

Literally, what has come to pass. Implying that Judas thought that some change had taken place in Jesus' plans. He had assumed that Jesus would, as the Messiah, reveal Himself publicly.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

Judas1 (not Iscariot)2 saith unto him, Lord, what is come to pass that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world3?

  1. Judas. For this Judas, or Thaddeus, see for a table of apostles and also see .

  2. (Not Iscariot). Who had gone out.

  3. Saith unto him, Lord, what is come to pass that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world? The form of his question betrays the apostle's bewilderment. Expecting that Jesus would soon be an earthly king, he could not imagine how Jesus could so have changed his plans as to thus withdraw himself utterly from the world. The answer of Jesus gave Judas but little present light.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:22". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Иуда. говорит Ему. Иуда обоснованно спрашивает, почему Христос удерживает Своей свет лишь среди немногих. Ведь Он – солнце праведности, которым надлежит просветиться всему миру. Кажется странным, что Христос светит для немногих, и не везде без разбора рассеивает Свое сияние. Ответ Христа не решает всего вопроса. Ведь здесь не упоминается о первой причине, почему Христос, явив Себя немногим, сокрылся от большинства людей. Действительно, Он всех находит в равном положении, то есть полностью Ему чуждыми. Поэтому Он не может избрать кого-то, кто любил бы Его, но избирает из врагов Своих тех, сердца которых Сам склоняет к любви. Однако здесь Христос не хотел говорить об этом различении, ибо замысел Его состоял в другом. Его цель заключалась в поощрении учеников к усердию в благочестии, дабы они все время преуспевали в вере. Итак, Он довольствовался тем, что выделил их из мира следующим признаком: они хранят евангельское учение. Этот признак последует вере, потому что является следствием призвания. В другом месте Христос учит учеников их благодатному призванию, и то же самое говорит им впоследствии. Теперь же Он лишь приказывает им соблюдать Его учение и заниматься благочестием. Кроме того, этими словами Христос показывает, каким образом надо правильно слушаться Евангелия. А именно: наши обязанности и внешние действия должны порождаться любовью ко Христу. Напрасно будут утруждать руки, ноги и все тело, если в сердце не правит любовь Божия, управляющая внешними членами. Поскольку твердо установлено, что мы тогда соблюдаем заповеди Христовы, когда Его любим. Отсюда следует, что нигде в мире нельзя найти совершенной к Нему любви. Ведь никто в совершенстве не соблюдает Его заповеди. Но Богу угодно послушание тех, кто стремится к этой цели искренне и усердно.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books

Ver. 22. "Judas, not Iscariot, says to him, Lord, and what is come to pass, that thou art to show thyself to us, and not to the world?"

The mode of the revelation of which Jesus had just spoken entirely perplexed the minds of the disciples, which were ever directed towards the outward manifestation, visible for all, of the Messiah-King and His glorious kingdom. It was especially in the lower group of the apostolic company, influenced by the carnal spirit of Iscariot, that such thoughts persistently continued. The Judas or Jude here mentioned bears this name only in Luke (Luke 6:16, Acts 1:13). In the catalogues of Matthew (Matthew 10:3) and Mark (Mark 3:18) he is designated by the names (surnames) Lebbeus and Thaddaeus: the bold or the cherished one. He occupies one of the lowest places among the apostles. The explanation: not Iscariot, is intended to remove the supposition of a return of Judas after his going out, John 13:30.

By saying: What is come to pass? Judas asks for the indication of a new fact causing the change of the Messianic programme, the proof of which he thinks he observes in the words of Jesus in John 14:21. The καί, and, before τί γέγονεν, is the expression of surprise; it was omitted in some MSS., as superfluous.— To us signifies here: "To us only."

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Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-14.html.

Scofield's Reference Notes

world

kosmos = world-system. John 15:18; John 15:19; John 7:7. (See Scofield "Revelation 13:8").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on John 14:22". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/john-14.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

22 Judas saith unto him, not Iscariot, Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?

Ver. 22. How is it that thou wilt manifest, &c.] Many a wise question the disciples ask him in this chapter; and yet our Saviour bears with their rudeness, and gently instructs them, preaching as they were able to hear, Mark 4:33. So did Paul, 1 Corinthians 9:22. So must all ministers, 2 Timothy 2:25, if they mean to do good on it.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Some understand these words of a temporal manifestation, and thing that Judas the brother of James, who spake them, still expected that Christ should be a temporal prince, and have such a kingdom as should be conspicuous to all the world, and therefore puts the question. How he could possibly shew himself to his disciples, and the world not see him? Others understand it of a spiritual manifestation; as if he had said, "Lord! who or what are thy disciples, that we should enjoy more special manifestations of thy love to us, than to the rest of the world? Why should we be dignified by such distinguishing favours above others?"

Learn hence, 1. That there is a real difference put by Christ betwixt his own children and the world, in the matter of special manifestations.

2. That there being no cause from the creature why Christ should make this difference, his discrimination grace is matter of just and great admiration. Well might the apostle out of a deep admiration say, Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 14:22". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-14.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

22.] ἰούδας, οὐχ ὁ ἰσκ. = ἰούδας ἰακώβου of Luke 6:16; see note on Matthew 10:2 ff. Meyer remarks that the οὐχ ὁ ἰσκαριώτης is pragmatically superfluous, after ch. John 13:30, but is added by St. John from his deep horror of the Traitor who bore the same name.

The question seems to be put with the Jewish idea, that the Messiah, the King and Judge of the nations, must necessarily manifest himself to the world.

[ καί preceding an interrogation, expresses astonishment at what has just been said, and, assuming it, connects to it a conclusion which appears to refute or cast doubt on it. So Eur. Med. 1388,— ὦ τέκνα φίλτατα! “ μητρί γε, σοὶ δʼ οὔ.” κἄπειτʼ ἔκτας; See more examples in Hartung, i. p. 146, and cf. Kühner on Xen. Mem. p. 117.]

τί γέγ. ὅτι] What has happened, that …? i.e. how is it, that …?

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 14:22". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-14.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:22. Judas (Thaddaeus or Lebbaeus, Matthew 10:3; not, however, a brother of the Lord, Acts 1:13-14, but son of one James, Luke 6:16)(154) expects a bodily appearance of Christ in Messianic glory, has in this view misunderstood Jesus, and is therefore surprised that He has spoken of His ἐμφανίζειν ἑαυτόν as having reference only to the man who loves Him, and not also to the world of the unbelieving, on whom the Messiah when He appeared was in truth to execute judgment.

τί γέγονεν] What has come to pass, in respect to the fact that, etc.? What occurrence has determined Thee, etc.? See Kypke, I. p. 403 f. The foregoing καί as in John 9:36.

The addition οὐχ ἰσκαρ. was indeed, after John 13:30, quite superfluous, but is to be explained as an involuntary outflow of the deep loathing felt at the traitor of like name. The latter is not to be thought of as again present (Bengel).

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 14:22". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-14.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 14:22. οὐκ ἰσκαριώτης, not Iscariot) He distinguishes the godly Judas, not by his own surname, but by setting aside (by the negation of) the surname of the other Judas; marking at the same time the traitor as present again after his negotiation with the Lord’s adversaries, but as alien to such a question.— τί γέγονεν, what hath happened that? [“How is it that?”]) The godly Judas seems to have supposed that something has happened, because of which the world would be deprived of that revelation of Jesus: but through modesty he had no remembrance of his own peculiar privilege above the world.— ἡμῖν, unto us) who love Thee.— οὐχὶ τῷ κόσμῳ, not to the world) John 14:17; John 14:19. So the opinion of a worldly kingdom, generally entertained by the disciples, is cut off.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:22". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Jude the brother of James, Jude 1:1, the son of Alphaeus; not Judas the son of Simon, who, from the city whence he was, was called Iscariot, and was the traitor; asks our Saviour, how it was, or wherefore it was, that he would manifest himself to them, and not to the world? This question either proceeded out of ignorance, not aright understanding of what manifestation of himself Christ here spake; or out of a pious desire that all might be made partakers of the same grace with them; or out of the apostle’s modest opinion of himself and his brethren; as if he had said, Lord, what are we that thou shouldest speak of any more special manifestation of thy love to us, than to the rest of the world? Or out of a deep admiration of God’s unsearchable judgments in leaving some of the world, while he made choice of others to dignify with such special distinguishing favours, hiding those things from the wise and prudent which he revealed to babes.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

How is it; he supposed that Jesus spoke of his bodily presence. But after the Holy Ghost should come, he would remember and better understand the words of Christ.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

22.Judas’ not Iscariot—John is here careful to exclude Iscariot from the honour of making this deep inquiry. Indeed it does not appear that Iscariot ever propounded an inquiry to Jesus regarding the deep things of his mission and doctrine.

Unto us, and not unto the world—In the body Christ was visible alike to his apostles and to the world. It is a query then with Judas of what nature is this manifestation, which is limited to Christ’s followers alone. Jesus can only reply by reaffirming with more distinct emphasis the spirituality of that manifestation.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Judas, (not Iscariot), said to him, “Lord, how is it that you will fully reveal yourself to us and not to the world?” ’

Like all the disciples the other Judas (‘Judas of James’ not Judas Iscariot) was puzzled. It was anticipated by most that the expected Messiah would make himself known to the world in a great outward show, so that the world would follow him, and it would appear that in spite of Jesus’ clear teaching of the opposite that is what the disciples have mainly assumed up to this point. For men have always assumed that once God works He will do it spectacularly and everyone will respond. Their view is that all that is needed is a boost. But it has never been so. Such spectacular happenings may produce a temporary change of attitude, but they never change the heart. Always it has been the comparatively few who have truly responded, for the response must be a true one from the heart, not one produced by mass hysteria. The change required to be brought about is not superficial. God had made many spectacular demonstrations of His power in the past, but in no case had it resulted in a full hearted continual response from those who claimed to be His people.

This is the mystery of ‘the elect’, those who respond to God and are chosen by God. They come to God as God reveals Himself in their hearts. Jesus Himself had said that only the minority would enter the ‘narrow’, the ‘pressed in’, way (Matthew 7:14). So while man’s glory is in huge movements, and in the swaying of the masses, God works in individuals. It is, however, understandable that Judas was mystified. Who could foresee at that time what was to come?

Again it began with the resurrection appearances, but it continued as He personally revealed Himself in their hearts in their day by day lives, as the powerhouse within. As Paul could say, ‘yet no longer I but Christ lives in me’ (Galatians 2:20). That is why Jesus could promise them, ‘Lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the world (age)’ (Matthew 28:19-20).

(In Luke 6:16 this Judas is called ‘Judas of James’ i.e. probably ‘son of’. He is also called Thaddaeus (Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18). Having two names, often a Greek and an Aramaic one, appears to have been commonplace).

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-14.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

There were two members of the Twelve named Judas. The one who voiced this question was Judas the son or brother of James ( Luke 6:16; Acts 1:13). He is probably the same man as Thaddaeus (cf. Matthew 10:2-4; Mark 3:16-19).

Judas" question reflects the disciples" understanding that as Messiah Jesus would manifest Himself publicly, which He had taught them (cf. Matthew 24:30). The disciples did not understand that Jesus would rise again bodily ( John 20:9) much less that the Holy Spirit would come to indwell them. Therefore it is unlikely that Judas was asking Jesus to clarify the manner of His appearing. Judas wanted to know what Jesus meant when He said that He was not going to disclose Himself publicly but just privately to the Eleven. He and his fellow disciples failed to realize that Jesus would reveal Himself to them privately after His resurrection before He revealed Himself publicly at His second advent.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-14.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:22. Judas saith unto him, not Iscariot, Lord, how hath it come to pass that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world? Judas is distinguished from the traitor, that we may have kept distinctly before us that the latter had gone out (chap. John 13:30). His error consists in not seeing that the spiritual can only be apprehended by the spiritual. Filled with the thought of the external kingdom, he cannot understand why the glorious revelation of Christ to be made to himself and his fellow-disciples should not be male to all, so that all may believe and be blessed.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 14:22. All that Jesus has said has borne more and more clearly in upon the mind of the disciples the disappointing conviction that the manifestation referred to is not to be on the expected Messianic lines. Accordingly Judas, not Iscariot, but Thaddaeus or Lebbaeus (Matthew 10:3; Luke 6:16), says: . . . “What has happened that,” etc.? or, “What has occurred to determine you,” etc.? Kypke quotes from Arrian apposite instances of the use of this expression. Judas expresses, no doubt, the thought of the rest. Was there to be no such public manifestation of Jesus as Messiah, as would convince the world?

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:22". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

-25

Lord, how is it? Literally, what is done, or, what will be done, that thou art about to manifest thyself to us, and not to the world? This apostle imagined, that the Messias would make manifest his glory of a temporal kingdom, not to them only, but to all the world. But Christ, by his answer, lets him know, that he spoke only of a manifestation of his love to those that loved him. If any man love me, my Father will love him, and we will come to him, that is, the three divine persons, will come to his soul, in a special manner, so as to bless him with an infusion of graces, and make our abode in his soul. (Witham)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 14:22". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Judas. App-141. Brother or son of James (Luke 6:16, Revised Version) Five others of this name. Judas Iscariot; Judas, the Lord"s brother (Matthew 13:30); Judas of Galilee (Acts 5:37); Judas of Damascus (Acts 9:11); and Judas Barsabas (Acts 15:22). This is the only mention of this Judas. how is it . . . P = how comes it to pass?

wilt = art about to.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:22". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Judas saith unto him, not Iscariot, Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the Judas saith unto him, not Iscariot, Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?

Judas saith unto him, (not Iscariot). Delightful parenthesis this! The traitor being no longer present, we needed not to be told that this question came not from him; nor even if he had been present would any that knew him have expected any such question from him. But the very name had gotten an ill savour in the Church ever since that black treason, and the Evangelist seems to take a pleasure in disconnecting from it all that was offensive in the association, when reporting the question of that dear disciple whose misfortune it was to have that name. He is the same with Lebbaeus, whose surname was Thaddaeus, in Matthew's catalogue of the Twelve. (See the note at Matthew 10:3.)

Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world? - a question, as we think, most natural and pertinent, though interpreters (as Lucke, Stier, Alford, etc.) think it proceeded from a superficial, outside, Jewish misconception of Christ's kingdom. Surely the loving tone and precious nature of our Lord's reply ought to have suggested a better view of the question itself.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(22) Judas saith unto him, not Iscariot.—That he was “not Iscariot” is mentioned to distinguish him beyond all possibility of confusion from him who had gone out into the darkness, and was no longer one of their number (John 13:30). He is commonly identified with “Lebbæus whose surname was Thaddæus” (comp. Note on Matthew 10:3), and was a brother or son of James (Luke 6:15).

How is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?—The word “manifest” has brought to the mind of Judas, as the word “see” had to the mind of Philip (John 14:7), thoughts of a visible manifestation such as to Moses (Exodus 33:13; Exodus 33:18), and such as they expected would attend the advent of the Messiah (Malachi 3:1). But it was contrary to every thought of the Messiah that this manifestation should be to a few only. His reign was to be the judgment of the Gentiles, and the establishment of the Theocracy.

The words rendered, “How is it that . . .?” mean literally, What has happened that . . .? The words of our Lord, speaking of His manifestation, take Judas by surprise. He wonders whether anything has occurred to cause what he thinks a departure from the Messianic manifestation.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Judas saith unto him, not Iscariot, Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?
Judas
Matthew 10:3
Lebbaeus, Thaddaeus
Mark 3:18
Thaddaeus
Luke 6:16; Acts 1:13; Jude 1:1
how
3:4,9; 4:11; 6:52,60; 16:17,18
Reciprocal: Matthew 7:24 - whosoever;  Mark 6:3 - Juda;  John 1:39 - Come;  John 14:21 - and will;  John 16:23 - ask;  Acts 10:41 - Not

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 22. "Judas saith unto Him, (not Iscariot,) Lord, how is it that Thou wilt manifest Thyself unto us, and not unto the world?"—"The disciples," says Lampe, "did well in confessing their ignorance, and in asking questions for their further instruction. Their questions bring us excellent fruit, because they gave the Lord occasion to add further explanations and encouragements." "Not Iscariot:" that was obvious of itself. But care for the honour of the true Judas, to whom it was a severe grief to have a name like the traitor's, required that provision should be made against the possibility of ever so fleeting a confounding of the two persons, by keeping them absolutely distinct. Matthew, in Matthew 10, takes pains to avoid naming the true disciple by his name of Judas: he introduces him by a double surname, Lebbeus and Thaddeus, and makes the former take the place of his proper name. Mark also calls him Thaddeus in ch. Mark 3:18. Luke, in the Acts, describes him as Judas the brother of James, at a time when Judas Iscariot was already dead, and confusion was not possible any longer. The paraphrastic name in Matthew and Mark, and the addition ἰακώβου in Luke, sprang from the same reason as the "not Iscariot" here.

"How is it," what has happened? (Lachmann omits the καί; but it has been struck out here on the same grounds which secured its omission in ch. John 9:36): there must, in his opinion, something extraordinary have taken place, indeed some fatal incident must have interposed, that Jesus should limit His revelation to His disciples, and withdraw it from the world. Christ's universal dominion, as predicted by the prophets, and so many earlier announcements of our Lord Himself—for example, that He would draw all men unto Him, and that many should come from the east and west, and sit down with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of God—appeared to him to be altogether out of keeping with such a word as this. There would have been much to reply, indeed, to such a difficulty. For example: that Jesus did not renounce His absolute victory over the world by not revealing Himself to it; that the exclusion referred only to the world which should refuse to abandon its wickedness; and that Christ would adopt the most effectual means of redeeming it from that sinful nature. But Jesus limits Himself in His answer to one thing. After express repetition of the encouraging promise to His disciples. He indicates that the world excludes itself from participation in this glorious promise, inasmuch as it does not fulfil the absolute and unchangeable condition on which it is suspended. Thus nothing had taken place; no hindrance had occurred to baffle the Lord, constrain Him to change His plans, and give up His vast enterprise; the world simply made itself unworthy of so high an honour. We may compare Ecclesiastes 7:10 for the τί γέγονεν: "Say not thou, What is the cause that the former days were better than these?"—what has brought in this fatal change?

Stier is not quite correct in making it the only word uttered by this Judas. It must be placed in connection with ch. John 7:4. There the "brethren" of Jesus say to Him: "If Thou doest these things, show Thyself unto the world." The view is very common, that in the mission of Jesus a revelation to the world was necessarily given; that it is not enough if a little company in quietness enjoy His manifestations. The nearest connections of Jesus after the flesh were least satisfied with the notion of a seeming dominion in a corner. But by the appeal, "Lord," Judas shows that he laid his scruples humbly at his Master's feet.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 14:22". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

22.Judeas (not Iscariot)saith to him. It is not without reason that he asks why Christ does not cause his light to be imparted (71) to more than a few persons; since he is the Sun of Righteousness, (Malachi 4:2) by whom the whole world ought to be enlightened; and, therefore, it is unreasonable that he should enlighten but a few, and not shed his light everywhere without distinction. Christ’s reply does not solve the whole question; for it makes no mention of the first cause, why Christ ‘manifested himself to a few,’ conceals himself from the greater part of men; for certainly he finds all men at first alike, that is, entirely alienated from him; and, therefore, he cannot choose any person who loves him, but he chooses from among his enemies those whose hearts he bends to the love of him. But he did not intend, at present, to take any notice of that distinction, which was far from the object he had in view. His design was, to exhort his disciples to the earnest study of godliness, that they might make greater progress in faith; and, therefore, he is satisfied with distinguishing them from the world by this mark, that they keep the doctrine of the Gospel.

Now, this mark comes after the commencement of faith, for it is the effect of their calling. In other passages, Christ had reminded the disciples of their being called by free grace, and he will afterwards bring it to their recollection. At present, he only enjoins them to observe his doctrine, and to maintain godliness. By these words, Christ shows in what manner the Gospel is properly obeyed. It is, when our services and outward actions proceed from the love of Christ; for in vain do the arms, and the feet, and the whole body toil, if the love of God does not reign in the heart, to govern the outward members. Now, since it is certain that we keep the commandments of Christ only in so far as we love him, it follows that a perfect love of him can nowhere be found in the world, because there is no man who keeps his commandments perfectly; yet God is pleased with the obedience of those who sincerely aim at this end.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:22". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.