Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:30

I will not speak much more with you, for the ruler of the world is coming, and he has nothing in Me;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus Continued;   Persecution;   Satan;   Thompson Chain Reference - Adversary;   Defeat of Satan;   Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Names;   Prince of This World;   Princehood of Satan;   Satan;   Satan's;   Satan-Evil Spirits;   Serpent;   Silence;   Silence-Speech;   Silent, Christ;   Tempter;   Titles and Names;   The Topic Concordance - Antichrist;   Government;   Jesus Christ;   Love;   Will of God;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Titles and Names of the Devil;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Tempt;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Satan;   World;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Holy Ghost;   Jesus Christ;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Satan;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   John, the Gospel According to;   Satan;   Thousand Years;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic;   Devil;   Prince;   Security of the Believer;   Temptation of Jesus;   World, the;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   God;   Hereafter;   Holy Spirit;   John, Theology of;   World;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ascension of Isaiah;   Atonement (2);   Attributes of Christ;   Devil ;   Endurance;   Evil (2);   Ideas (Leading);   Man;   Obedience (2);   Personality;   Poet;   Prince (2);   Reality;   Satan (2);   Sifting;   Sin (2);   Sinlessness;   Worldliness (2);   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fruit;   Pentecost;   Samuel;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Sa'tan;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Antichrist;   Here;   Person of Christ;   Prince;   Salvation;   Satan;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for July 8;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The prince of this world - Τουτου, of this, is omitted by ABDEGHKLMS, Mt. BH, one hundred others; both the Syriac, later Persic, all the Arabic, and several of the primitive fathers. I rather think the omission of the pronoun makes the sense more general; for, had he said This world, the words might have been restrained to the Jewish state, or to the Roman government. But who is the person called here the prince of the world?

  1. Mr. Wakefield thinks that Christ speaks here of himself, as he does in John 12:31, (see the note there), and translates this verse and the following thus: For the ruler of this world is coming; and I have nothing now to do, but to convince the world that I love the Father, and do as he commanded me. On which he observes that our Lord speaks of what he shall be, when he comes again, and not of what he then was: compare John 14:18; John 16:16; John 17:2; Matthew 28:18; Philippians 2:9. And how often does he speak of himself, as the Son of man, in the third person! See his vindication of this translation in the third vol. of his New Testament.
  • Others think that our Lord refers to the Roman government, the ruler of the world, who, by its deputy, Pilate, was going to judge him, but who should find nothing (εὑρησει ουδεν, which is the reading found in some excellent MSS. and versions, and is followed by almost all the primitive fathers), as a just cause of death in him - nothing in the whole of his conduct which was in the least reprehensible; and this indeed Pilate witnessed in the most solemn manner. See John 18:38; John 19:4, John 19:12; see also Luke 23:4, etc., and Matthew 27:24.
  • 3. But the most general opinion is that Satan is meant, who is called the prince of the power of the air, Ephesians 2:2; and who is supposed to be the same that is called the god of this world, 2 Corinthians 4:4; and who at his last and most desperate trial, the agony in the garden, should be convinced that there was nothing of his nature in Christ, nothing that would coincide with his solicitations, and that he should find himself completely foiled in all his attacks, and plainly foresee the impending ruin of his kingdom. It is very difficult to ascertain the real meaning here: of the different opinions proposed above, the reader must take that which he deems the most likely.

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    These files are public domain.
    Bibliographical Information
    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 14:30". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-14.html. 1832.

    Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

    Will not talk much - The time of my death draws near. It occurred the next day.

    The prince of this world - See the notes at John 12:31.

    Cometh - Satan is represented as approaching him to try him in his sufferings, and it is commonly supposed that no small part of the pain endured in the garden of Gethsemane was from some dreadful conflict with the great enemy of man. See Luke 22:53; “This is your hour and the power of darkness.” Compare Luke 4:13.

    Hath nothing in me - There is in me no principle or feeling that accords with his, and nothing, therefore, by which he can prevail. Temptation has only power because there are some principles in us which accord with the designs of the tempter, and which may be excited by presenting corresponding objects until our virtue be overcome. Where there is no such propensity, temptation has no power. As the principles of Jesus were wholly on the side of virtue, the meaning here may be that, though he had the natural appetites of man, his virtue was so supreme that Satan “had nothing in him” which could constitute any danger that he would be led into sin, and that there was no fear of the result of the conflict before him.

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Bibliographical Information
    Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-14.html. 1870.

    The Biblical Illustrator

    John 14:30

    Henceforth I will not talk much with you

    Christ as a conversationalist

    I.
    CHRIST’S GREATEST WORK WAS DONE BY CONVERSATION.

    1. In the four Gospels there are but five discourses properly so called--that in the synagogue at Nazareth, that upon the Mount, that on the Bread of Life in the synagogue at Capernaum, that on the seashore, when He practically traced the future of His kingdom, and that at Jerusalem respecting His second coming. All the rest is conversation, sometimes drifting into monologue. It is significant that the two greatest teachers--Christ and Socrates--taught chiefly in this way.

    2. Here is an open door for you all! You cannot write books or preach; but there is no better way into a human heart than by conversation. I write my article and send it to the newspaper. I know not who looks upon it. I stand here and talk, and look into your faces. Some of them answer me back. This is better work than that of the pen. But the best of all is conversation when you open your soul to me, and I open mine to you. In this lies the largest part of our influence. What might we not do with it!

    II. Notice, as a characteristic of every good conversationalist, and preeminently of Christ, His QUICK AND CATHOLIC SYMPATHIES.

    1. We open this Gospel and find Him talking on the same plane with a Jewish rabbi. We turn the page and behold Him condescending to the level of the depraved Samaritan. Further on we see Him in conversation with His enemies; and, lastly, here with His disciples--in every case alike in sympathy, in touch--what we call tact. What is tact? The touch of one soul with another. I can talk music a little with the musician, for I am fond of music; less of art with the artist, for I know less; about theology with the theologian if he is not too far removed from me theologically; but if I cannot talk with the car conductor, the day labourer, it is because my sympathies are narrow.

    2. Christ’s sympathies were as quick as they were catholic. His soul was receptive as well as distributive. The musician plays on the keys of the organ. They are inert, and answer to his touch. But when the speaker plays on a human soul, he must be keys as well as fingers--he must respond as well as move. There is no flash of thought, question of perplexity, or sorrow anywhere that Christ does not instantly meet.

    III. Because He had this quick and catholic sympathy HE DREW MEN OUT. He made them express themselves; oftentimes against their will--evoked their doubts, sins, difficulties. Witness His treatment of Philip, Thomas, and Jude in this conversation. This is rare power: worth more than eloquence or poetry. He knew what was in man; and more than once He saw them doubting among themselves, and phrased His answer to their doubting.

    IV. HE HAD THE GIFT OF TURNING EVERYTHING TO ACCOUNT. He asks for a drink of water, and this suggests the water of life; He fed a multitude with bread, and then talked naturally about the bread of life. A friend of mine, on entering a train, asked the brakeman, “When shall we get to Albany?” “I do not know,” surlily replied the man, “there is nothing certain on a train.” “Nothing but death,” said my friend. “Well, that is so.” “Yes, and therefore we ought to be ready for it.” “That is a fact,” said the brakeman. If my friend had gone out of his way to preach he would not have got an answer.

    V. CONVERSATION WITH CHRIST WAS ALWAYS THE INSTRUMENT OF DIVINE MINISTRY. Christ never declined an invitation; but wherever He went, He carried His message of love and goodness, and turned the least incidents into moral lessons, He was always master of the conversation. He was not carried by its drift, wherever it might go, but, like a skilful pilot with his hand on the helm, guided it in what direction He would have it go. (Lyman Abbott, D. D.)

    We must prize our opportunities

    Make we the best of our Christian friends while we have them: as we would do of a borrowed book or tool that we knew not how soon may be sent for by the right owner. (J. Trapp.)

    Interruption

    Christ thus closed the conversation to intimate to His disciples

    I. THE VALUE OF WHAT HE HAD SPOON IN THE PAST.

    1. As their rule of life. “If ye love Me, keep My commandments.”

    2. As teaching them to draw instruction from every source.

    3. As being the means of life.

    II. THE NEED OF CONCENTRATION IN AN APPROACHING CONFLICT. a time of peace was followed by a time of trial. Christ was ready for it, and concentrated every faculty for a final struggle with the devil, who was worsted by Him in the wilderness, and left Him then for a season.

    II. THAT THE CONSCIOUSNESS OF FREEDOM FROM THE CONDEMNATION OF SIN GIVES THE GREATEST POWER TO WITHSTAND THE ASSAULTS OF SATAN. There was no ledge in Christ on which the devil could stand, nothing at which he could clutch. Our weaknesses Satan knows too well. He has something in us. But we may rejoice in freedom from condemnation. Doubt as to this is what Satan loves to take hold of; and it is frequently a sincere Christian’s weakest point

    IV. THAT HE HAS RESOLVED TO MAINTAIN PURITY. “Shall have.” Christ had no doubt about the issue: nor need there be any in those whom Christ upholds. “Resist the devil and he will flee from you.” Against the Church the gates of hell shall not prevail.

    V. THAT THE DISCIPLES MIGHT LEARN MORE FROM SEEING THAN HEARING. It is not what a man says, but what he does, that influences others. Christ has said: “Whosoever taketh not up his cross,” etc. Did He shrink from taking it up Himself? Christ ceases to talk, and allows His life to speak.

    VI. CHRIST’S SORROW THAT HIS INTERCOURSE WITH HIS DISCIPLES HAD TO BE INTERRUPTED. All are subject to all sorts of interruptions here. We must be prepared for breaks in life, gaps in the family, vacant chairs. Still we may, with Christ, take up the joyful life. Death possesses nothing permanent in us. (Homiletic Magazine.)

    The prince of this world cometh and hath nothing in Me

    The coming struggle

    I. THE ENEMY--the prince of this world.

    1. Of large dominions (Matthew 4:8).

    2. Of many subjects (Ephesians 2:2).

    3. Of great power (Ephesians 2:2; Eph_6:12).

    4. Of subtle craft (Genesis 3:1; Revelation 12:9).

    5. Of evil mind (1 John 2:13; 1Jn_3:8; 1Jn_8:44; Revelation 12:10).

    II. THE ONSET. The prince of this world cometh.

    1. Its proximity. Judas was at hand, and in him Satan was drawing near.

    2. Its violence. Quite an army had the devil put in force against the Saviour.

    3. Its aim. It was directed against heaven’s purpose of redemption. It was meant by destroying Christ to confound the counsel of salvation.

    4. Its skill. The campaign had on Satan’s side been planned with ingenuity. Judas, an apostle, had been persuaded to become a traitor. The ecclesiastical authorities had been turned against God’s Son. The Roman power had been secured to lend assistance in affecting His arrest. All signs augured well for the success of his infernal scheme.

    III. THE DEFEAT. The prince of this world hath nothing in Me.

    1. The seeming victory. Outwardly, Satan was to triumph. Yet it was not to be because of any power which Satan possessed; but to be of Christ’s free will (John 10:18).

    2. The actual overthrow (Hebrews 2:14; Colossians 2:15).

    Learn

    1. That Christ is wiser than Satan.

    2. That as He conquered so shall His people. (T. Whitelaw, D. D.)

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    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
    Bibliographical Information
    Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 14:30". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-14.html. 1905-1909. New York.

    Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

    I will no more speak much with you, for the prince of the world cometh: and he hath nothing in me; but that the world may know that I love the Father, and as the Father gave me commandment, even so do I. Arise, let us go hence.

    The prince of the world ... is another reference to Satan as in John 12:31.

    Hath nothing in me ... There is a hint here that Satan might have expected to have something in Christ; but the Saviour calmly announced that he would do what the Father had commanded, that is, die on the cross; and how, it may be wondered, had Satan hoped to thwart that? Satan had already exhausted every resource in vain efforts to kill Jesus; but with the announcement that Jesus would lay down his life of his own accord (John 10:17,18), and that it was impossible for any man to take his life away from him, Satan changed his strategy, thereafter exhausting every satanic resource in making Jesus' death such a shameful, repugnant, and humiliating thing, that the Lord might finally abort the mission of redemption by refusing to die such a repulsive death for such a people. That such a temptation came to Jesus is certain from Matthew 26:53. Jesus here announced that Satan's strategy had failed. The price of human redemption would be paid by the Saviour. For extended discussion of Satan's strategy in these tremendous events, see my Commentary on Matthew, Matthew 26:39, and my Commentary on Romans, p 118.

    Arise and let us go hence ... Some believe that Jesus and his disciples immediately rose up and left the scene of the last supper; but Hendriksen believed it likely that the next three chapters, which might easily have been spoken in ten or fifteen minutes, were uttered while they were standing and prior to leaving. As he stated it:

    This context implies there are still some things Jesus wished to say to his disciples (John 14:30) ... How often it happens even among us Westerners that between exhortation, "Now, let us be going," and the actual departure there is a period of ten minutes? ... Speaking calmly and deliberately, with no attempt to rush himself, Jesus might have uttered the contents of John 15 through John 17 within a period of TEN MINUTES. When a company has been together several hours, what are ten minutes? ... Accordingly, we shall proceed upon the assumption that the contents of John 14-17 comprise a unit, and that all of this was spoken that night in the upper room.[21]

    ENDNOTE:

    [21] William Hendriksen, op. cit., II, pp. 290-291.

    Copyright Statement
    Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
    Bibliographical Information
    Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    Hereafter I will not talk much with you,.... Meaning before his death; for after his resurrection he talked much with them, about the things pertaining to the kingdom of God; being seen of them and conversing with them, for the space of forty days; not much, he says, chiefly what is delivered in the two next chapters: the design of this was, to observe to them that his time of departure was near at hand, and to quicken their attention to what he did say to them; since they could not expect to hear him long, or much more from him; he would be otherwise engaged;

    for the prince of this world cometh: by "the prince of this world", is meant the devil; why he is so called; see Gill on John 12:31; the reason why Christ chooses to use this circumlocution, rather than to say Satan or the devil cometh, is partly to point out what a powerful adversary he had, and was about to engage with, and partly to observe to his disciples, what they must expect from the world, even hatred and persecution; since Satan was the prince of it, and had such powerful influence over the minds of the men of it. When it is said that he cometh, it is to be understood of his coming to Christ, though it is not expressed, and that with an intent agreeably to his character, as a thief, to kill and to destroy; and not of his coming merely by Judas, into whom he had already entered, and had put it into his heart to betray him; and by the armed soldiers, who would accompany him to apprehend him; and by the chief priests, rulers, and people of the Jews, who with united voices would cry, Crucify him, Crucify him; nor only invisibly by his angels, his principalities and powers, he was now employing in different ways, to bring about his purposes; but of his coming himself personally, and visibly: as he visibly appeared to Christ in the wilderness, tempting him, where he left him for a season; so this season or opportunity being come, he takes it, and visibly appears to him in the garden, where a sharp agony and combat was between them; what success he had in this conflict, is next mentioned;

    and hath nothing in me; or as some copies read it, "shall find nothing in me"; or as others, "hath nothing to find in me"; Christ had no sin in him, which can be said of none but him. The Jews sayF5Tzeror Hammor, fol. 44. 2. , that Samuel, by whom they mean the devil, when he wrestled with Jacob, שלא מצא בו עון, "could not find any iniquity in him", he had committed; but this is only true of Jacob's antitype: for though his emissaries sought diligently for it, they could find none in him; though he had sin upon him, he had none in him; the sins of his people were imputed to him, but he had no sin inherent in him; hence, though he the Messiah was "cut off", according to Daniel 9:26, "but not for himself"; which by the Septuagint is rendered και κριμα ουκ εστιν εν αυτω, "but there is no judgment" or "condemnation in him", i.e. no cause of condemnation; which agrees with what is here said: though the accuser of men sought to have something against him, to accuse him of, he could find none; some pretences indeed were made, and charges brought, but could not be made good, insomuch that the judge himself said, "I find in him no fault at all", John 18:38, so that the devil had no power over him, no rightful power, nor any but what he had by permission, nor indeed did he prevail over him; for though according to the first prophecy of the Messiah, Satan bruised the heel of Christ; yet Christ bruised his head, destroyed him and his works, spoiled him, and his principalities and powers; whence it appears that the death of Christ was not owing to any sin of his own, for he had none, nor could any be found in him; nor to the superior power of the devil over him; he submitted to death, not through the power of Satan over him, and complied with all the circumstances leading to it, not out of fear of him, but in love to his Father, and obedience to his command; as is clear from the following verse.

    Copyright Statement
    The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
    A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
    Bibliographical Information
    Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:30". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

    Geneva Study Bible

    11 Hereafter I will not talk much with you: for the prince of this world cometh, and hath m nothing in me.

    (11) Christ goes to death not unwillingly, but willingly, not that he is yielding to the devil, but rather that he is obeying his Father's decree.

    (m) As one would say, "Satan will eventually set upon me with all the might he can, but he has no power over me, neither will he find any such thing in me as he thinks he will."

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
    Bibliographical Information
    Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 14:30". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-14.html. 1599-1645.

    John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

    30. Hereafter I will not talk much with you: for the prince of this world cometh, and hath nothing in me.

    [The prince of this world cometh.] Seeing this kind of phrase, the prince of this world, was, in the common acceptation of the Jewish nation, expressive of the devil ruling among the Gentiles, it may very well be understood so in these words; because the very moment of time was almost come about, wherein Christ and the devil were to enter the lists for the dominion and government, which of those two should have the rule over the Gentiles.

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
    Bibliographical Information
    Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on John 14:30". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/john-14.html. 1675.

    People's New Testament

    The prince of this world cometh. The worldly powers of which Satan is prince.

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
    Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
    Bibliographical Information
    Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 14:30". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-14.html. 1891.

    Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

    The prince of the world (ο του κοσμου αρχωνho tou kosmou archōn). Satan as in John 12:31 which see.

    Copyright Statement
    The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
    Bibliographical Information
    Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

    Vincent's Word Studies

    Hereafter I will not talk ( οὐκ ἔπι λαλήσω )

    Rev., more correctly, I will no more speak.

    The prince of this world

    The best texts read, “of the world.”

    Hath nothing in me

    No right nor power over Christ which sin in Him could give. The Greek order is, in me he hath nothing.

    Copyright Statement
    The text of this work is public domain.
    Bibliographical Information
    Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

    Wesley's Explanatory Notes

    Hereafter I will not talk much with you: for the prince of this world cometh, and hath nothing in me.

    The prince of this world is coming — To make his grand assault.

    But he hath nothing in me — No right, no claim, or power. There is no guilt in me, to give him power over me; no corruption to take part with his temptation.

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
    Bibliographical Information
    Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 14:30". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-14.html. 1765.

    The Fourfold Gospel

    I will no more speak much with you1, for the prince of the world cometh: and he hath nothing in me2;

    1. I will no more speak much with you. In a few hours the earthly teaching of Jesus would be interrupted by the coming of Satan and would never be resumed save in occasional fragments.

    2. For the prince of the world cometh: and he hath nothing in me. Satan would come in the persons of his servants and emissaries, but he would find nothing in Christ which would give him either right or reason to exercise power over him.

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
    Bibliographical Information
    J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:30". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

    Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

    Уже немного Мне говорить с вами. Этими словами Христос хочет привлечь внимание учеников и глубже внедрить в их души Свое учение. Ведь сытость часто порождает скуку. Итак, мы пламеннее просим о том, чего еще не имеем, и с большим усердием пользуемся тем, что вскоре будет у нас отнято. Христос возвещает, что вскоре уйдет, дабы ученики с большей жадностью внимали Его учению. Хотя Христос не перестает учить нас всю жизнь, эти Его слова применимы и к нам. Поскольку жизнь наша коротка, надо пользоваться любой возможностью научения.

    Идет князь мира сего. Христос мог бы просто сказать, что вскоре умрет, и что час смерти уже настал. Но Он возвещает это косвенным образом, дабы укрепить души Своих людей. Они не должны ослабеть, взирая на столь позорную и ужасную разновидность смерти. Ибо верить в распятого Христа есть не что иное, как искать жизнь в самой преисподней. Вначале Христос говорит, что эта власть дана сатане, а потом добавляет, что Он идет не понуждаемый необходимостью, а ради послушания Отцу. Дьявол зовется здесь князем мира не потому, что владеет царством отдельно от Бога, как бредили манихеи, но потому что по попущению Божию проявляет в мире Свою тиранию. Итак, всякий раз, когда мы слышим, что дьяволу приписывается это имя, пусть нас постыжает наша несчастная участь. Хотя люди и надмеваются, они все равно остаются рабами дьявола, покуда не возродятся Духом Христовым. Под миром же здесь разумеется весь человеческий род. Ибо есть лишь Один Избавитель, исхищающий нас из этого ужасного рабства. Кроме того, эта кара была вызвана грехом первого человека и каждый день увеличивается из-за новых грехов. Научимся же из этого ненавидеть себя и свои грехи. Мы – пленники в царстве сатаны, но это рабство не извиняет нас, поскольку полностью добровольно. Следует отметить, что дьяволу приписываются здесь дела нечестивых людей. Ведь они действуют по его наущению, так что он заслуженно присваивает себе их поступки.

    И во Мне ничего не имеет. Поскольку именно из-за греха Адама сатана и смерть возымели над нами власть, они не могли бы коснуться Христа, чистого от всякой вины, если бы Он Сам им не покорился. Хотя, я думаю, эти слова надо трактовать еще шире. Толкователи изъясняют их так: сатана ничего не находит во Христе, поскольку в Нем нет никакой материи смерти. Ведь Он чист от всякого греха. Но, по моему мнению, Христос говорит здесь не только о Своей чистоте, но и о божественной власти, не подверженной никакой смерти. Надо было засвидетельствовать ученикам, что Он не подвержен никакой немощи. Ведь им не следует непочтительно думать о силе Христовой. Однако в это общее положение включено и предыдущее: Христос не был подвластен сатане, когда пошел на смерть. Отсюда явствует, что Он, идя на эту смерть, пошел на нее вместо нас.

     

     

     

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    Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    30 Hereafter I will not talk much with you: for the prince of this world cometh, and hath nothing in me.

    Ver. 30. Hereafter I will not, &c.] Make we the best of our Christian friends while we have them; as we would do of a borrowed book or tool, that we know not how soon they may be sent for by the right owner.

    The prince of this world cometh] In his limbs and instruments, those breathing devils that put Christ to death. Persecutors are set to work by Satan; "the devil shall cast some of you into prison," Revelation 2:10. Why? Is he become a justice of peace, to send men to prison? Yes, by his agents. But why would Christ be so used by him and his? Hear the next words.

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    Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:30". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

    Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

    30.] οὐκ ἔτι πολλὰ λαλ.:—then, as Stier remarks, He had some words more to say, and was not about to break off at John 14:31, as some have supposed: cf. Grotius: “q. d., temporis angustiæ abripiunt verba.”

    ὁ τ. κόσ. ἄρχων] i.e. Satan:—not, Satan in Judas, but Satan himself, with whom the Lord was in conflict during His passion: see Luke 4:13 (and note), and Luke 22:53.

    ἐν ἐμοὶ οὐκ ἔχ οὐδ.] “Nullum scilicet omnino peccatum.” Aug(203) ibid. 2. This is the only true interpretation: has nothing in Me—no point of appliance whereon to fasten his attack. But Meyer well observes, that this is rather the fact to be assumed as the ground of what is here said, than the thing itself which is said. De Wette, Lücke, Tholuck, and many others render it, “has no power over me,”— οὐδὲν αἴτιον θανάτου, Euthym(204)

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    Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 14:30". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-14.html. 1863-1878.

    Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

    John 14:30. οὐκέτι πολλὰ, κ. τ. λ.] “Quasi dicat: temporis angustiae abripiunt verba,” Grotius.

    For the prince of the world (see on John 12:31) is coming (is already drawing near). Jesus sees the devil himself in the organs and executors of his design (John 13:2; John 13:27, John 6:70; Luke 4:13).

    τοῦ κόσμου] is here emphatically placed first in antithesis to ἐν ἐμοί.

    καὶ ἐν ἐμοὶ οὐκ ἔχει οὐδέν] and in me (antithesis of the κόσμος, John 17:16) he possesses nothing, namely, as pertaining to his dominion, which more minute definition flows from the conception of the ἄρχων; hence neither ποιεῖν (Kuinoel), nor μέρος (Nonnus), nor “of which he could accuse me before God” (Ewald), is to be supplied; nor again is the simple sense of the words to be transformed into “he has no claim on me” (Tholuck, Hofmann, and several others); comp. Luther: “cause and right.” In any case, Christ expresses the full moral freedom with which He subjects Himself to death (John 10:18). The sinlessness, which Cyril., Augustine (“in me non habet quicquam, nullum omnino scilicet peccatum”), Euth. Zigabenus, Cornelius a Lapide, and many others, including Olshausen, here find expressed, certainly lies at the foundation as a necessary causal presupposition, since only provided that Jesus were sinless, could the devil have in Him nothing that was his, but is not directly expressed. That He has already overcome the world (John 16:33) is not the reason (Lücke), but the consequence of His freedom from the prince of the world.

    The καί is not: but (Ebrard, Godet); for the antithesis first follows with ἀλλά. Therefore: he comes, and is powerless over me (wherefore I needed not to surrender myself to him), but, nevertheless, that, etc, John 14:31.

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    Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 14:30". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-14.html. 1832.

    Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

    John 14:30. οὐκ ἔτι, no longer henceforth) For which reason ye ought the more diligently to hold fast these things which I speak.— ἔρχεται, cometh) is already now coming: having been “cast out,” ch. John 12:31, he rushes upon Me. So afterwards he assailed the women spoken of in Revelation 12:9; Revelation 12:13.— γὰρ, for) The enemy, as being already in the act of making his assault, either on account of the shortness of the time did not suffer Him to speak more, or he ought not to hear the Lord’s words; or, had more been said to the disciples, he might have snatched it from them.— κόσμου, of the world) Even then the prince of the world agitated (influenced) the world, when the world, in compliance with its prince, crucified Christ.— καὶ, and) and cannot prevent Me from going from the world straightway to the Father.— ἐν ἐμοὶ, in Me) although Jesus was now approaching death, of which the devil in other respects had the power.— οὐδὲν, nothing) no share of claim (right) or power over Me. The righteousness of Christ was perfect: a becoming protestation. Here Jesus gets rid of (removes out of the way) the prince of the world; in the second and closing part of this discourse, He gets rid of the world; ch. John 16:33, “In the world ye shall have tribulation; but be of good cheer, I have overcome the world.”

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    Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:30". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    I shall not have much time hereafter to reveal my mind to you, my suffering is very near; the devil, who is

    the prince of this world, See Poole on "John 12:31", See Poole on "John 16:11" and See Poole on "Ephesians 6:12" he cometh by the evil angels, or rather by vile and wicked men, as his instruments, Judas and the soldiers. He doth not say wherefore he came, but it is easily understood. And he hath nothing in me that he can justly fault, and take advantage against me, for he findeth no guilt in me to give him any advantage against me; I shall die as an innocent person, and be cut off, but not for myself, (as it was prophesied of the Messiah, Daniel 9:26), but (as it is there, John 14:24), to finish transgression, and to make reconciliation for iniquity, and to bring in everlasting righteousness.

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    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:30". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

    Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

    князь мира сего Иуда был только орудием «князя» – сатаны, который правит миром тьмы (6:70; 13:21, 27).

    во Мненичего Еврейская идиома означает, что у сатаны не было ничего против Иисуса, он не мог предъявить Ему претензию и не мог обвинить Его ни в каком грехе. Поэтому сатана не мог удержать Иисуса в смерти. Христос победит сатану и уничтожит его (Евр. 2:14). Смерть Иисуса не была признаком победы сатаны, а являлась исполнением Божьей воли (ст. 31).

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    MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 14:30". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-14.html.

    Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

    Prince of this world; the devil.

    Nothing in me; no sin or weakness of which he can take advantage. The devil would not succeed in his object, but would only help to show that Jesus was the Messiah.

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    Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    30.Will not talk much—The period of silence is approaching. The betrayer, the officer, and the crucifier, under the prince of this world, will soon absorb him. Fright will disperse them; and, except his precious utterances in his resurrection body, they will soon be left forever to the recollections of their own hearts, and the ministration of the Spirit.

    The prince of this world—Satan, with all the powers of evil.

    Cometh—To inflict sufferings and cut short all discourse.

    Hath nothing in me—Hath no basis in my mind or will by which he can bring me to sin, or rightfully bring destruction upon me. This means, not that Jesus was without ability to will wrongly, but that he maintains a free will not to exercise that ability. He so, by will, shuts Satan off, that the tempter finds nothing upon which he can grapple.

     

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    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

    Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

    John 14:30. I will no longer talk much with you, for the prince of the world cometh. (Comp. on chap. John 12:31.) Here it is particularly to be noted that ‘the prince of this world’ is equivalent to the world in its essence. He embodies the spirit of the world, so that what is said of it may be said of him, what is said of him may be said of it. Observe the ‘cometh,’ the contrast of the ‘coming’ of Jesus.—And he hath nothing in me.

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    Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

    The Expositor's Greek Testament

    John 14:30. . “I will no longer speak much with you”; “temporis angustiae abripiunt verba,” Grotius.— . “The ruler of this world” is Satan, see John 12:31. He “comes” in the treachery of Judas (John 13:27) and all that followed. But this coming was without avail, because , “in me he hath nothing,” nothing he can call his own, nothing he can claim as his, and which he can use for his purposes. He is ruler of the world, but in Christ has no possessions or rule. A notable assertion of sinlessness.

     

     

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    Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:30". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    Hereafter I will not = No longer (Greek. ouk eti) will I.

    prince. See John 12:31.

    nothing. Greek. ouk ouden, a double negative, for emphasis. No sin for Satan to work upon. Compare John 8:46. 2 Corinthians 6:21. Hebrews 4:15. 1 Peter 2:22, 1 Peter 2:23; 1 John 3:5.

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    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:30". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    Hereafter I will not talk much with you: for the prince of this world cometh, and hath nothing in me.

    Hereafter I will not talk much with you: - `I have a little more to say, but My work hastens apace, and the approach of the adversary will cut it short.'

    For the prince of this world cometh (see John 12:31) - cometh with hostile intent, cometh for a last grand attack. Foiled in his first deadly assault, he had "departed" - but "till a season" only (see the note at Luke 4:13). That season is now all but come, and his whole energies are to be once more put forth-with what effect the next words sublimely express.

    And hath nothing in me - nothing of his own in Me, nothing of sin on which to fasten as a ryghteous cause of condemnation: 'As the Prince of this world he wields his sceptre over willing subjects; but in Me he shall find no sympathy with his objects, no acknowledgment of his sovereignty, no subjection to his demand.' Glorious saying! The truth of it is the life of the world. (Hebrews 9:14; 1 John 3:5; 2 Corinthians 5:21.)

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    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

    The Bible Study New Testament

    30. Because the ruler of this world. Satan, working through wicked men. See note on Revelation 13:2.

     

     

     

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    Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 14:30". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-14.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (30) Hereafter I will not talk much with you.—Better, I will no more, or, I will not continue to talk much with you. The discourse is broken by the thought that the hour of the conflict is at hand, and that He must go forth to meet it.

    For the prince of this world cometh.—Better, is coming. The approach is thought of as then taking place. For the phrase, “prince of this world,” comp. Note on John 12:31. The prince of evil is here regarded as working in and by Judas, who is carrying out his plans and doing his work. (Comp. Notes on John 6:70; John 13:2; John 13:27.)

    And hath nothing in me.—The words are to be taken in their full and absolute meaning, and they assert that the prince of this world possesses nothing in the person of Christ. In Him he has never for a moment ruled. For this appeal to perfect sinlessness, comp. Note on John 8:29. It follows from this that His surrender of Himself is entirely voluntary. (Comp. Note on John 10:18.)

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    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    Hereafter I will not talk much with you: for the prince of this world cometh, and hath nothing in me.
    I
    16:12; Luke 24:44-49; Acts 1:3
    the
    12:31; 16:11; Luke 22:53; 2 Corinthians 4:4; Ephesians 2:2; 6:12; Colossians 1:13; 1 John 4:4; 1 John 5:19; *Gr:; Revelation 12:9; 20:2,3,7,8
    and
    Luke 1:35; 2 Corinthians 5:21; Hebrews 4:15; 7:26; 1 Peter 1:19; 2:22; 1 John 3:5-8
    Reciprocal: Genesis 3:15 - thou;  Leviticus 17:7 - unto devils;  Job 2:2 - From going;  Psalm 22:21 - me from;  Daniel 9:26 - but not;  Matthew 4:1 - to;  Matthew 4:9 - I give;  Matthew 4:11 - the devil;  Matthew 12:26 - his;  Luke 4:6 - and to;  Luke 4:13 - GeneralJohn 8:46 - convinceth;  John 9:24 - we know;  Romans 12:2 - be not;  Romans 15:3 - Christ;  Galatians 1:4 - from;  Titus 2:12 - this;  Revelation 9:11 - they had

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    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:30". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

    Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

    30.Henceforth I will not talk much with you. By this word he intended to fix the attention of the disciples on himself, and to impress his doctrine more deeply on their minds; for abundance generally takes away the appetite, and we desire more eagerly what we have not in our possession, and delight more in the enjoyment of that which is speedily to be taken from us. In order, therefore, to make them more desirous of hearing his doctrines, he threatens that he will very soon go away. Although Christ does not cease to teach us during the whole course of our life, yet this statement may be applied to our use; for, since the course of our life is short, we ought to embrace the present opportunity.

    For the prince of this world cometh He might have said, in direct language, that he would soon die, and that the hour of his death was at hand; but he makes use of a circumlocution, to fortify their minds beforehand, lest, terrified by a kind of death so hideous and detestable, they should faint; for to believe in him crucified, what is it but to seek life in hell? First, he says that his power will be given to Satan; and next he adds, That he will go away, not because he is compelled to do so, but in order to obey the Father.

    The devil is called the prince of this world, not because he has a kingdom separated from God, (as the Manicheans imagined,) but because, by God’s permission, he exercises his tyranny over the world. Whenever, therefore, we hear this designation applied to the devil, let us be ashamed of our miserable condition; for, whatever may be the pride of men, they are the slaves of the devil, till they are regenerated by the Spirit of Christ; for under the term world is here included the whole human race. There is but one Deliverer who frees and rescues us from this dreadful slavery. Now, since this punishment was inflicted on account of the sin of the first man, and since it daily grows worse on account of new sins, let us learn to hate both ourselves and our sins. While we are held captives under the dominion of Satan, still this slavery does not free us from blame, for it is voluntary. It ought also to be observed, that what is done by wicked men is here ascribed to the devil; for, since they are impelled by Satan, all that they do is justly reckoned his work.

    And hath nothing in me. (74) It is in consequence of the sin of Adam that Satan holds the dominion of death, and, therefore, he could not touch Christ, who is pure from all the pollution of sin, if he had not voluntarily subjected himself. And yet I think that these words have a wider meaning than that in which they are usually explained; for the ordinary interpretation is, “Satan hath found nothing in Christ, for there is nothing in him that deserves death, because he is pure from every stain of sin.” But, in my opinion, Christ asserts here not only his own purity, but likewise his Divine power, which was not subject to death; for it was proper to assure the disciples that he did not yield through weakness, lest they should think less highly of his power. But in this general statement the former is also included, that, in enduring death, he was not compelled by Satan. Hence we infer, that he was substituted in our room, when he submitted to death.

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    Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:30". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.