Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 3:10

Jesus answered and said to him, "Are you the teacher of Israel and do not understand these things?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Blindness;   Jesus, the Christ;   Life;   Minister, Christian;   Mysteries;   Nicodemus;   Salvation;   Scriptures;   Thompson Chain Reference - Experience (Knowledge Experimental);   Knowledge;   Knowledge, Experimental;   Knowledge-Ignorance;   Nicodemus;   The Topic Concordance - Unbelief;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Ignorance of God;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Nicodemus;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Education;   John, gospel of;   Nicodemus;   Teacher;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Disciple, Discipleship;   Salvation;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Episcopacy;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Nicodemus;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   Nicodemus;   Proselytes;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Holy Spirit;   Nicodemus;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Gospels;   Holy Spirit;   John, Gospel of;   John, Theology of;   Light;   Mss;   Nicodemus;   Scribes;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Benedictus;   Discourse;   Doctor (2);   Elect, Election ;   Holy Spirit;   Individuality;   Israel, Israelite;   Mental Characteristics;   Property (2);   Questions and Answers;   Religious Experience;   Righteous, Righteousness;   Sacrifice (2);   Son of God;   Teacher (2);   Teaching of Jesus;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - 48 To Know, Perceive, Understand;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Regeneration;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Nicodemus;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Nicode'mus;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Heart;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Tabernacle, the;   Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Eschatology of the New Testament;   Heavenly;   Master;   Nicodemus;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Birth, New;   Nicodemus;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for December 4;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Art thou a master of Israel, etc. - Hast thou taken upon thee to guide the blind into the way of truth; and yet knowest not that truth thyself? Dost thou command proselytes to be baptized with water, as an emblem of a new birth; and art thou unacquainted with the cause, necessity, nature, and effects of that new birth? How many masters are there still in Israel who are in this respect deplorably ignorant; and, strange to tell, publish their ignorance and folly in the sight of the sun, by writing and speaking against the thing itself! It is strange that such people cannot keep their own secret.

"But water baptism is this new birth." No. Jesus tells you, a man must be born of water and the Spirit; and the water, and its effects upon the body, differ as much from this Spirit, which it is intended to represent, and the effects produced in the soul, as real fire does from painted flame.

"But I am taught to believe that this baptism is regeneration." Then you are taught to believe a falsity. The Church of England, in which perhaps you are a teacher or a member, asks the following questions, and returns the subjoined answers.

    "Q. How many sacraments hath Christ ordained in his Church?"

    "A. Two only, as generally necessary to salvation, that is to say, baptism and the supper of the Lord."

    "Q. How many parts are there in a sacrament?"

    "A. Two. The outward visible sign, and the inward spiritual grace."

    "Q. What is the outward visible sign, or form, in baptism?"

    "A. Water, wherein the person is baptized, In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost."

    "Q. What is the inward and spiritual grace?"

    "A. A death unto sin, and a new birth unto righteousness; for being by nature born in sin, and the children of wrath, we are hereby made the children of grace."

Now, I ask, Whereby are such persons made the children of grace? Not by the water, but by the death unto sin, and the new birth unto righteousness: i.e. through the agency of the Holy Ghost, sin is destroyed, and the soul filled with holiness.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 3:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

A master of Israel - A “teacher” of Israel; the same word that in the second verse is translated “teacher.” As such a teacher he ought to have understood this doctrine. It was not new,” but was clearly taught in the Old Testament. See particularly Psalm 51:10, Psalm 51:16-17; Ezekiel 11:19; Ezekiel 36:26. It may seem surprising that a man whose business it was to teach the people should be a stranger to so plain and important a doctrine; but when worldly-minded men are placed in offices of religion when they seek those offices for the sake of ease or reputation, it is no wonder that they are strangers to the plain truths of the Bible; and there have been many, and there are still, who are in the ministry itself, to whom the plainest doctrines of the gospel are obscure. No man can understand the Bible fully unless he is a humble Christian, and the easiest way to comprehend the truths of religion is to give the heart to God and live to his glory. A child thus may have more real knowledge of the way of salvation than many who are pretended masters and teachers of Israel, John 7:17; Matthew 11:25; Psalm 8:2, compared with Matthew 21:16.

Of Israel - Of the Jews; of the Jewish nation.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-3.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 3:10

Art thou a master of Israel, and knowest not these things?
--The truths which Christ came to declare, He did but recall in great measure to minds which had lost the memory of what was from the first.

I. THE NEED OF SPIRITUAL CIRCUMCISION, CLEANSING OR RENEWAL OF THE HEART, WAS NO NEW DOCTRINE OF CHRIST (see Deuteronomy 10:16, 1 Samuel 10:9; Psalms 51:10; Jeremiah 31:33; Ezekiel 11:19).

II. THE COMING OF THE HOLY SPIRIT AND HIS PRESENCE IN MAN’S HEART HAD BEEN FORETOLD BY THE PROPHETS (Ezekiel 36:25-27).

III. HENCE THE IGNORANCE OF THIS DISTINGUISHED TEACHER WAS INEXCUSABLE. (W. Denton, M. A.)

The doctrine of the new birth was according to Jesus exhibited in the Old Testament.

I. THE DOCTRINE OF THE FALL IMPLIES IT, especially when viewed in connection with the Divine purity and holiness as the only moral standard for humanity (Genesis 17:1; Exodus 22:31; Leviticus 11:44; Psalms 24:3-4; Isaiah 35:8).

II. CIRCUMCISION OF THE HEART WAS AN INDISPENSABLE QUALIFICATION for serving God (Deuteronomy 10:16; Deu_30:6), which was symbolized by circumcision (Romans 2:29) as it is now by baptism (1 Peter 3:21).

III. It was PREFIGURED IN THE CHANGE OF HEART CONFERRED on Saul and 1 Samuel 10:9; 1Sa_16:13).

IV. It was RECOGNIZED IN DAVID’S PRAYER FOR PURITY (Psalms 51:10).

V. It was EXPRESSLY PROMISED AS A MESSIANIC BLESSING (Ezekiel 11:19; Eze_18:31; Eze_36:26; Jeremiah 4:4; Jer_31:33).

VI. EVEN THE TERM “REGENERATION” WAS NOT UNKNOWN (Job 11:12; Psalms 37:25).

The reasonableness of regeneration

What phraseology was more familiar with the infidel revolutionists of France than the regeneration of their country? And is the idea of a regenerated individual an extravagant one, to be sneered at, when that of a regenerated nation is one to be treated with respect? Yea, infidel speculators will discourse of a regenerated world, and yet make sport to themselves of our faith, as if it were fantastic and visionary, when we speak of the regeneration of a single man! How is it that, being such masters in philosophy and politics, they know not these things? (W. Anderson, D. D.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 3:10". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-3.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And Jesus answered and said unto him, Art thou the teacher of Israel and understandest not these things?

By this answer, Christ did not deny some element of mystery regarding the questions Nicodemus had raised, but was exclaiming at his failure to understand the basic things Christ had commanded him to do. The Lord's words to this ruler of the Jews were the blunt equivalent of "Look, you Pharisees stop rejecting John's baptism; obey God by submitting to it; but that is only part of it; you must allow the Spirit of God to dwell in your heart, and that can come about only by your following me" (Luke 7:30).

Greater importance attaches to John's baptism than is usually supposed. Jesus submitted to that baptism, as did (presumably) all the apostles, for it is inconceivable that the disciples of Jesus would have refused a baptism to which Jesus himself submitted. Also, those disciples baptized others during John's ministry; and they could not have done this without themselves accepting it and obeying it. Though called the baptism of John, it was actually God's baptism administered by John. Also, for a season, it was also administered by Jesus through his apostles. It was mandatory for all Israel, even for the priests and Pharisees; and it was the only baptism in force until Pentecost. With Pentecost and the preaching of the Great Commission, John's baptism was supplanted by that of the commission; but it was valid until then. The function of John's baptism was exactly like that of the great commission in the particulars of its being by immersion and its being the separator between the true Israel of God and the hardened secular Israel with which the true Israel was commingled until Pentecost.

The Pharisees, including Nicodemus, had utterly rejected God's baptism administered by John, even though Jesus himself submitted to it; and that was the key to their ultimate rejection of Christ. The ignorance of the Pharisaical party regarding the sacred ordinance of baptism was the immediate beginning of the end of the whole Jewish nation as the covenant people. That stubborn blind ignorance, as it appeared so stark and adamant in Nicodemus, called forth the exclamation of Jesus in this verse. No wonder Israel was in trouble spiritually when even her noblest teachers rejected the idea of being born of water and of the Spirit. In such rejection, it was clear that the major part of Israel would continue to trust in Abrahamic descent, despite the warnings of both Jesus and John the Baptist (Matthew 3:8-10; John 8:39).

How strange is it that the same pattern of evil is endlessly repeated? Just as the Pharisees of Jesus' day stumbled at being "born of water," that is, at being baptized, just so, many today stumble at the very same thing; and it is no less a marvel now than it was then.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Jesus answered and said unto him,.... Upbraiding him with his continued and invincible ignorance, which was aggravated by his dignified character:

art thou a master in Israel? or "of Israel", as all the Oriental versions render it, as it literally may be rendered he was one of the חכמי ישראל, "wise men", or "doctors of Israel"F18Derech Eretz, fol. 18. 1. , so often mentioned by the Jews. One of the Jewish doctors was answered, by a boy, just in such language as is here used; who, not understanding the direction he gave him about the way into the city, said to him, אתה הוא חכם של ישראל, "art thou he, a doctor", or "master of Israel?" did not I say to thee so? &c.F19Echa Rabbati, fol. 44. 4. . He was not a common teacher; not a teacher of babes, nor a teacher in their synagogues, or in their "Midrashim", or divinity schools, but in their great sanhedrim; and the article before the word used will admit it to be rendered, "that master", doctor, or teacher; that famous, and most excellent one, who was talked of all over Jerusalem and Judea, as a surpassing one: and now, though he was not only an Israelite, with whom were the laws, statutes, judgments, and oracles of God, the writings of Moses, and the prophets; but a teacher of Israelites, and in the highest class of teachers, and of the greatest fame among them, yet was he ignorant of the first and most important things in religion:

and knowest not these things? which were so plainly to be suggested in the sacred writings, with which he was; or ought to have been conversant: for the same things Christ had been speaking of, are there expressed by a circumcision of the heart; by a birth, a nation's being born at once; by sanctification; by the grace of God signified under the metaphor of water; and by quickening persons, comparable to dry bones, through the wind blowing, and breathing into them, Deuteronomy 30:6.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 3:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-3.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

master — “teacher.” The question clearly implies that the doctrine of regeneration is so far disclosed in the Old Testament that Nicodemus was culpable in being ignorant of it. Nor is it merely as something that should be experienced under the Gospel that the Old Testament holds it forth - as many distinguished critics allege, denying that there was any such thing as regeneration before Christ. For our Lord‘s proposition is universal, that no fallen man is or can be spiritual without a regenerating operation of the Holy Ghost, and the necessity of a spiritual obedience under whatever name, in opposition to mere mechanical services, is proclaimed throughout all the Old Testament.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-3.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

10. Jesus answered and said unto him, Art thou a master of Israel, and knowest not these things?

[Art thou a master of Israel?] Art thou a Wise man in Israel? It was the answer of a boy to R. Joshua, when he asked him, "Which is the shortest way to the city? The boy answered, 'This is the shortest way though it is the longest: and that is the longest way though it is the shortest.' R. Joshua took that way which was the shortest, though the longest. When he came very near the city, he found gardens and places of pleasure hedged in [so that he could go no further]. He returned therefore to the boy, and said to him, 'My son, is this the shortest way to the city?' The boy answered, 'Art thou a wise man in Israel? did I not thus say to thee, That is the shortest way though the longest?'" &c.

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on John 3:10". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/john-3.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

Art thou a master of Israel, and knowest not these things? The question implies that Nicodemus was one of the doctors of the law. These made very arrogant claims of superior knowledge.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 3:10". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-3.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

The teacher of Israel (ο διδασκαλος του Ισραηλho didaskalos tou Israēl). The well-known or the authorized (the accepted) teacher of the Israel of God. Note both articles.

And understandest not these things? (και ταυτα ου γινωσκεισkai tauta ou ginōskeis). After being told by Jesus and after so propitious a start. His Pharisaic theology had made him almost proof against spiritual apprehension. It was outside of his groove (rote, rut, rot, the three terrible r‘s of mere traditionalism).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Answered and said

See on John 2:18.

Art thou a master of Israel ( σὺ εἶ ὁ διδάσκαλος τοῦ Ισραὴλ )

The σὺ , thou, is emphatic. A master is more correctly rendered by Rev., the teacher. Not ironical, but the article marks Nicodemus' official relation to the people, and gives additional force to the contrast in the following words. Similarly Plato: “Will you ( σὺ , emphatic), O professor of true virtue, pretend that you are justified in this?” (“Crito,” 51). On “Israel,” see on John 1:47. The word occurs four times in John's Gospel; here, John 1:31, John 1:47, John 1:49.

Knowest not ( οὐ γινώσκεις )

See on John 2:24. Nicodemus is not reproved for the want of previous knowledge, but for the want of perception or understanding when these truths are expounded to him. Rev., better, understandest not.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-3.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

Jesus answered and said unto him, Art thou the teacher of Israel, and understandest not these things1?

  1. Art thou the teacher of Israel, and understandest not these things? The Jewish teachers or doctors of the law made very arrogant claims to knowledge, but it often happens that the professedly learned are remarkably unacquainted with the first principles of their religion. It was so with the Jewish teachers (Matthew 15:14). Nicodemus should have understood that such a change as Jesus was speaking of would be necessary, for (1) It was foreshadowed in the Old Testament (Deuteronomy 10:16 1 Samuel 10:9; 1 Samuel 16:13; Psalms 51:10; Ezekiel 18:31; Jeremiah 4:4). (2) John the Baptist suggested the need of some such change when he attacked the Jewish trust in their descent from Abraham (Matthew 3:9; Luke 3:8).

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 3:10". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-3.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

He ought to have known them, for the power of God, in respect to the renewal of the heart, is often recognized in the Old Testament, especially in the book of Psalms.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-3.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Ты учитель Израилев. Поскольку Христос счел напрасным тратить время и силы на обучение горделивого человека, Он переходит к его обличению. Действительно, в таких людях учение никак не может возыметь плода, покуда они не лишатся своей превратной самоуверенности. Кроме того, этот упрек весьма подходит для усмирения гордыни Никодима. Ведь Христос указывает на его незнание в тех вещах, в которых он казался себе наиболее осведомленным. Никодим считал солидным и достойным своей учености не допускать существования невозможного, поскольку думал: соглашающийся со словами другого без надлежащего доказательства чрезмерно доверчив. Однако Никодим со своими учеными предрассудками сам был достоин осмеяния, поскольку по-детски не разбирался в первоосновах учения. Подобная неуверенность, действительно, позорна и неприлична. Где будет религия, где познание Бога, где правила благочестивой жизни, где надежда на жизнь вечную, если мы не верим в то, что человек обновляется Духом Божиим? Итак, на слово «этого» падает ударение .Ведь Писание столь повсеместно внушает нам это учение, что оно должно быть известно даже неучам. Итак, не следует терпеть того, кто в нем не осведомлен, но при этом провозглашает себя учителем Церкви.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-3.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

a master

Lit. Art thou the teacher of Israel, etc.

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on John 3:10". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/john-3.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

10 Jesus answered and said unto him, Art thou a master of Israel, and knowest not these things?

Ver. 10. Art thou a master, &c.] The Pharisees and philosophers, for their learning, are called "princes of this world," 1 Corinthians 2:8. And yet, had they known, they would never have crucified the Lord of glory. Indocti rapiunt coelum, &c. The poor are gospelized, { ευαγγελιζονται, Matthew 11:5} not only receive it, but are changed by it. But Bellarmine cannot find in all the Bible where remission of sin is promised to such as confess their sins to God; Promissio de remittendis peccatis eis qui confitentur Deo non videtur ulla extare in divinis literis. (Bell. de Justif. i. 21.)

And knowest not these things] Carolostadius was eight years doctor when he began to read the Scriptures, whereof he had very little understanding; and yet at the taking of his degree he had been pronounced sufficientissimus.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 3:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-3.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

10.] I believe the E. V. is right in rendering ὁ διδ. a master; the article is inserted as required by τοῦ before ἰσραήλ, which is expressed as giving a solemnity to ἰσρ. as the people of God. Or is it possible that ὁ διδάσκαλος may merely be meant as one of οἱ διδάσκαλοι? I prefer either of these reasons for the presence of the article, to supposing it to have any emphatic meaning. Nicodemus was manifestly in no supereminent place among the ἄρχοντες: see ch. John 7:50-52. Still less can I with Bp. Middleton, Gr. Art. pp. 242–3, believe any blame conveyed in the title. [Dean Alford afterwards preferred rendering ὁ διδάσκαλος the teacher; see N.T. for English Readers, and N.T. Authorized Version Revised.]

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 3:10". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-3.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 3:10. διδάσκαλος, a master) a teacher of very many hearers, a veteran, and one somewhat better than the rest, who are altogether corrupt: ch. John 10:8, “All that ever came before Me were thieves and robbers,” notes. The article is emphatic. Nicodemus was the only one of all the teachers of Israel who had come to Jesus Christ, and who thus would be able to teach Israel the knowledge of Him; and indeed he afterwards acted the part of a teacher of Israel, defending the Just One, both by his opinion, ch. John 7:50, [at the consultation of the Pharisees against Jesus, Nicodemus said] “Doth our law judge any man before it hear him?” and by his act, ch. John 19:39, [he brought for the body of Jesus] “a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about an hundred pound weight:” in which two passages the Evangelist repeats the mention of this interview by night.— ταῦτα) these things, which make Israel [truly] divine.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 3:10". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-3.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Our Saviour doth not so much wonder at as upbraid the ignorance of Nicodemus, and all of his sect, who went for masters, or teachers, and that in Israel; who had the law and the prophets, and yet were ignorant of those things which were necessary to be known to every ordinary person’s salvation. Will any say, But where was there any thing spoken in the books of the law and the prophets about regeneration, or a being born again?

Answer. What other things could be meant by the circumcision of the heart, commanded by Moses, Deuteronomy 10:16, promised in Deuteronomy 30:6; by the new heart, and the new spirit, promised Ezekiel 36:26; by the clean heart prayed for by David, Psalms 51:10? A teacher in Israel should from hence have understood the necessity of a new and of a clean heart; but the whole sect of the Pharisees were so taken up with the trifles of the rites and traditions, and the works of the law, that as to these spiritual things of nearer and much higher concernment to people’s souls, they knew and spake little of them.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 3:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-3.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

учитель Употребление определенного артикля указывает на то, что Никодим был известным в израильском народе учителем-знатоком, признанным религиозным авторитетом. Он пользовался высокой репутацией у раввинов и учителей своего времени. Ответ Иисуса сделал особое ударение на духовном банкротстве нации, поскольку даже один из величайших иудейских учителей не постиг этого учения о духовном очищении и изменении, ясно обоснованного в Ветхом Завете (ср. ст. 5). В результате, оно должно показывать, что религиозная обрядность может губительно действовать на духовное состояние человека.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 3:10". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-3.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Master of Israel; teacher, which he was by virtue of his office as a ruler.

These things; the things relating to the new birth, about which he had been speaking, and which were revealed in the Old Testament, which the Jewish rulers professed to teach. Psalms 51:10; Ezekiel 11:19; Ezekiel 36:26.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-3.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10.Knowest not these things?—Jesus here affirms all that rationalists claim; namely, that, both as a reader of the Old Testament and a rabbi, Nicodemus ought to have known better than to put a bodily construction on the Lord’s words. He implies such an inconsistency to be surprising, and yet strange to say, evangelical commentators, (as Alford, Tholuck, and Lange,) in compliment to their objectors, explain away Nicodemus’s inconsistency, and show that there is nothing surprising about it! That a man may be, in a period of religious declension, as ignorant as Nicodemus on this deep subject, even under a brighter dispensation, and with this third chapter of John to instruct him, may be illustrated by the following passage from the Life of Summerfield, p. 350: “During one of his illnesses he was visited by two highly respectable clergymen, one of whom inquired, ‘How old are you?’ The suffering saint replied, ‘I was born at Preston, in England, in 1798, and born again at Dublin, in Ireland, in 1817.’ The visitor expressed at once his surprise and curiosity at what, to him, was so strange a declaration. Mr. Summerfield rejoined, in the language of Jesus to Nicodemus, ‘Art thou a master in Israel, and knowest not these things?’ and then related to him the history of his own conversion.” The reverend gentleman, after departing, inquired of his clerical companion whether or not he knew anything about this strange doctrine; and finding that he too was the subject of the same happy change, sought and obtained the like blessing.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-3.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘ Jesus answered and said to him, “Are you the teacher of Israel, and do not understand these things?” ’

Jesus words are a gentle rebuke. ‘Do you claim to be a teacher (literally ‘the master’ - therefore a particularly learned teacher) of Israel and yet do not understand this?’ Many Pharisees were seen as ‘teachers of Israel’, and Nicodemus was particularly highly respected. They thought that it was from their teachers that men must find the secrets of God. So Jesus wants him to know that He considers that he should understand it because he has seen it in action in Himself and John the Baptiser. There are ‘earthly things’ witnessed on earth through the successes of John the Baptiser and the successes of His own ministry. Nicodemus really ought to have understood. But there are none as blind as those who are too certain that they are themselves right.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-3.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 3:10. Jesus answered and said unto him, Thou art the teacher of Israel; and perceivest thou not these things? The question which expressed the bewilderment of Nicodemus is answered by another question. He has assumed the office of teacher, teacher of God’s people Israel, and yet he does not recognise these truths. ‘Israel’ is a word used only four times in this Gospel, and never without special meaning. We have seen its significance in John 1:31 and John 1:49; and chap. John 12:13 is similar. The only remaining passage is that before us. No word so clearly brings into view the nation of God’s special choice. The name carries us back from a time of degeneracy and decadence to past days of hope and promise. It was to Israel that God showed His statutes and His judgments (Psalms 147:19), and this thought is very prominent here. Of Israel thus possessed of the very truths to which Jesus had made reference (see above, on John 3:5) Nicodemus is ‘the teacher.’ It is not simply ‘a teacher,’ though it is not very easy to say what the presence of the article denotes. It is possible that Nicodemus occupied a superior position, or was held in especial honour amongst the doctors of the law; or the words may merely imply that he magnified his office and was proud to be teacher of God’s people. Surely from him might have been expected such knowledge of the Scriptures and insight into their meaning that the truth of the words just spoken by Jesus would at once be recognised. For our Lord does not say ‘and knowest not;’ Nicodemus is not blamed for any want of previous knowledge of these things, but because he does not perceive the truth of the teaching when presented to him,—and presented, moreover, by One whose right to teach with authority he had himself confessed. It will be observed that Jesus does not answer the ‘How’ of the preceding question; that had been answered by anticipation. In John 3:8 Jesus had declared that the manner must be a mystery to man, whereas the fact was beyond all doubt. The fact was known to every one that had been born of the Spirit, but to such only. Hence in the following verse we have a renewed and more emphatic affirmation of the truth and certainty of what has been said. If Nicodemus would really know the fact, it must be by the knowledge of experience. He appears no further in this narrative. The last words have reduced him to silence,-thoughtful silence, we cannot doubt,-but have not brought him to complete belief.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-3.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 3:10. He opens with an exclamation of surprise, ; perhaps there is more of sadness than either of indignation or irony in the words. Is this the state of matters I have to confront? If the teacher is so obtuse what must the taught be? The presence of the article is usually taken as indicating that Nicodemus was recognised as a great teacher, perhaps held the official position of Chakam in the Sanhedrim. But Westcott is right: “the definite article marks the official relation of Nicodemus to the people generally”. It is used to bring out sharply, not the relation he held to other teachers, but the relation he held to the people. “Art thou the teacher of Israel and knowest not these things?” Bad enough for an Israelite to be blind to such things, but how much worse for one who teaches! But should a teacher of Israel have known these things? Westcott overleaps the difficulty by saying that refers to the knowledge of perception, and that Jesus is surprised that Nicodemus should not have been able during this conversation to apprehend what was said.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 3:10". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-3.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

And knoweth not these things. That is, of baptism given by in a visible manner, and you understand not, how will you comprehend greater and heavenly things, if I speak of them? (Witham) --- Many passages, both in the law and the prophets, implied this doctrine of regeneration; for what else can be the meaning of the circumcision of the heart, commanded by Moses; (Deuteronomy x. 16.) of the renewal of a clean and right spirit, prayed for by David; (Psalm 1.) of God's giving his people a new heart and a new spirit. (Ezechiel xxxvi. 26, &c.) But the Pharisees, taken up with their rites and traditions, paid little attention to spiritual things of greater moment.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 3:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Art thou . . . ? or Thou art, &c. Not irony.

a master = the (famous) teacher; referring to his official position. Greek. didaskalos. See App-98. John 3:4.

knowest not = hast not got to know; or perceivest not. Greek. ginosko. App-132. See note on John 1:10.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 3:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Jesus answered and said unto him, Art thou a master of Israel, and knowest not these things?

Jesus answered and said unto him, Art thou a master, [ su (Greek #4771) ei (Greek #1487) ho (Greek #3588) didaskalos (Greek #1320)] - rather, 'Art thou the teacher.' Perhaps this means only, 'Dost, thou occupy the important post of the teacher,' or doctor of the law; not, as some good critics understand it, 'Art thou the well-known,' or 'distinguished teacher,' "of Israel, and knowest not these things?" The question clearly implies that the doctrine of regeneration was so far disclosed in the Old Testament as to render Nicodemus' ignorance of it culpable. Nor is it merely as something that should be experienced under the Gospel that the Old Testament holds it forth-as many distinguished critics allege, denying that there was any such thing as regeneration before Christ. For our Lord's proposition is universal, that no fallen man is or can be spiritual without a regenerating operation of the Holy Spirit; and surely the necessity of a spiritual obedience, under whatever name in opposition to mere mechanical services, which is proclaimed throughout all the Old Testament, amounts to a proclamation of the necessity of regeneration.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-3.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

10. And you don’t know this? Nicodemus was one who taught others. The Doctors of the Law were very proud of how much they knew. He could not fail to know the prophecy of a new covenant (Jeremiah 31:31-33; Hebrews 8:7-13).

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 3:10". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-3.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) Art thou a master of Israel?—Better, Art thou the teacher of Israel? The article is emphatic, and points to the position of Nicodemus as a teacher of repute—“the well-known teacher;” or possibly it is to be understood of the Sanhedrin as represented by him—“Is this the teaching of Israel?” There is something of just indignation here, as everywhere when the words of Jesus Christ are addressed to the hypocrisy of the Pharisees. “You who teach others, have you need to learn the very first lessons of true religion? You who claim to loose and bind men, and place heavy burdens on them which they cannot bear, are you without the simplest real knowledge of what God is, or of what man is? Do teachers of Israel know not these things when they lie beneath every page of the Old Testament Scriptures?”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Jesus answered and said unto him, Art thou a master of Israel, and knowest not these things?
Art
Isaiah 9:16; 29:10-12; 56:10; Jeremiah 8:8,9; Matthew 11:25; 15:14; 22:29
and knowest
Deuteronomy 10:16; 30:6; 1 Chronicles 29:19; Psalms 51:6,10; 73:1; Isaiah 11:6-9; 66:7-9; Jeremiah 31:33; 32:39,40; Ezekiel 11:19; 18:31,32; 36:25-27; 37:23,24; Romans 2:28; Philippians 3:3; Colossians 2:11
Reciprocal: Joshua 7:26 - So the Lord;  Ecclesiastes 12:11 - masters;  Matthew 2:4 - he demanded;  Mark 7:18 - GeneralMark 11:33 - We;  John 3:1 - GeneralJohn 9:30 - herein;  1 Timothy 1:7 - understanding;  James 3:1 - be

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 3:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-3.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10.Thou art a teacher of Israel. As Christ sees that he is spending his time and pains to no purpose in teaching so proud a man, he begins to reprove him sharply. And certainly such persons will never make any progress, until the wicked confidence, with which they are puffed up, be removed. This is, very properly, placed first in order; for in the very matter in which he chiefly plumes himself on his acuteness and sagacity, Christ censures his ignorance. He thought, that not to admit a thing to be possible would be considered a proof of gravity and intelligence, because that man is accounted. foolishly credulous who assents to what is told him by another, before he has fully inquired into the reason. But still Nicodemus, with all his magisterial haughtiness, exposes himself to ridicule by more than childish hesitation about the first principles. Such hesitation, certainly, is base and shameful. For what religion have we, what knowledge of God, what rule of living well, what hope of eternal life, if we do not believe that man is renewed by the Spirit of God? There is an emphasis, therefore, in the wordthese; for since Scripture frequently repeats this part of doctrine, it ought not to be unknown even to the lowest class of beginners. It is utterly beyond endurance that any man should be ignorant and unskilled in it, who professes to be a teacher in the Church of God.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 3:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-3.html. 1840-57.