Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Joshua 3:9

Then Joshua said to the sons of Israel, "Come here, and hear the words of the Lord your God."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Word of God;   Scofield Reference Index - Israel;   Miracles;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joshua the son of nun;   Miracles;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jericho;   Joshua;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jordan ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ark;   Journeyings of israel from egypt to canaan;   Lachish;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Conquest of Canaan;  

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Joshua said unto the children of Israel, come hither,.... Very probably to the door of the tabernacle:

and hear the words of the Lord your God; which he was about to deliver to them as from him, and in his name.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Joshua 3:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/joshua-3.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Joshua said unto the children of Israel, Come hither, and hear the words of the LORD your God.

Come hither — To the ark or tabernacle, the place of public assemblies.

The Lord your God — Who is now about to give a proof that he is both the Lord, the omnipotent governor of heaven and earth, and all creatures; and your God, in covenant with you, having a tender care and affection for you.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Joshua 3:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/joshua-3.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Joshua 3:9 And Joshua said unto the children of Israel, Come hither, and hear the words of the LORD your God.

Ver. 9. Come hither, and hear the words of the Lord your God.] For miracles do but excite men; they do but as the bells that call us to the sermon, they cannot work faith in us: but faith cometh by hearing.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Joshua 3:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/joshua-3.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Come hither, to the ark or tabernacle, the place of public assemblies, and hear the words of the Lord your God; who is now about to give a proof that he is both the Lord, the omnipotent Governor of heaven and earth, and all creatures; and your God, in covenant with you, having a tender care and true affection for you.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Joshua 3:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/joshua-3.html. 1685.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

And Joshua said to the children of Israel, “Come here, and hear the words of YHWH your God.” ’

Possibly ‘here’ meant before the Tabernacle, as he spoke in God’s name. He wanted them to be aware that his words were from YHWH Himself. He was YHWH’s mouthpiece.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Joshua 3:9". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/joshua-3.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9.Unto the children of Israel — The objection that Colenso urges against these addresses to the children of Israel by Moses and by Joshua, that it was a physical impossibility for so vast an encampment to hear the words of one speaker, falls to the ground when we reflect that all the people were addressed, not personally en masse, but representatively, as specified Joshua 3:2 and Joshua 1:10; Joshua 1:16, through the heads and officers of their tribes.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Joshua 3:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/joshua-3.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Hither, probably to the door of the tabernacle, where the assemblies were held.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Joshua 3:9". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/joshua-3.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Joshua said unto the children of Israel, Come hither, and hear the words of the LORD your God.

Come hither and hear the words of the Lord. It seems that the Israelites had no intimation how they were to cross the river until shortly before the event. The premonitory address of Joshua, taken in connection with the miraculous result exactly as he had described it, would tend to increase and confirm their faith in the God of their fathers, as not a dull, senseless, inanimate thing, like the idols of the nations, but a Being of life, power, and activity, to defend them and work for them.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Joshua 3:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/joshua-3.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Joshua said unto the children of Israel, Come hither, and hear the words of the LORD your God.
Hear the words
Deuteronomy 4:1; 12:8
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Joshua 3:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/joshua-3.html.

The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

"Handfuls of Purpose"

For All Gleaners

"Come hither, and hear the words of the Lord your God."Joshua 3:9

In the Old Testament, the question of place has never been regarded as inferior.—To us locality is a matter of little or no importance, but to the Hebrew locality was an element of true worship.—The Israelites were in this instance invited to a particular place, in order that they might hear the words of the Lord.—Christianity so far enlarges this idea as to find in the sanctuary the place in which God especially reveals himself to earnest and expectant worshippers.—Jesus Christ went into the synagogue on the Sabbath-days. Jesus Christ also withdrew from the crowd in order that he might alone commune with God in the silence of night and the solitude of the mountain.—There is no doubt an utter destruction of the idolatry of place in Christianity; but the destruction of idolatry is not equal to the deconsecra-tion of given places of worship: the altar is still holy; the church is still recognised as praying-ground in an especial sense, namely, the sense of bringing together men of common sympathies and common aspirations, and giving them to feel the security of nearness and multitude.—Whilst it is possible to pray in the great throng, and even to commune upon deep subjects amid the noise of the world, yet Silence will ever be regarded as constituting a kind of sanctuary in which the soul more especially delights. Every Isaac will feel a pleasure in going into the fields at eventide to meditate.—There is a kind of thought which may be said to have its residence in the mountains, and a kind of praise which may be said to reach its noblest expression amid the waves of the great deep.—The mere act of "coming" is itself a religious exercise; it means withdrawment from usual avocation or entertainment, and specialty of thought and service: it breaks up the idea of commingling and intermixture, which too often tends towards earthliness rather than towards heavenliness, and constitutes in itself a severe trial of intellectual attention and moral expectation. Such coming means willingness to set apart time for Christian purposes, and to create opportunities for spiritual education.—Coming is thus, in some degree, a sacrifice, a token of the heart"s willingness to obey God rather than yield to the clamour of earthly appeals.—All men are the better for coming together for religious service.—We get something in fellowship which we can never get in solitude. Men belong to one another in this sense, and are not complete in the absence of one another.—Even where physical association is impossible, the very act of yearning after the absent, and compelling them to be spiritually present, is in itself an expression of the noblest religious feeling.—Atmosphere will always have its effect upon moral education.—Here the great subject of environment shows its importance.—Whilst there may be some minds so strong and independent as to create their own atmosphere, yet looking at men in the generality, they require the help of locality and all the subtile suggestion of association and habitude in order to excite religious impulse and expectation to the highest point-There is great plausibility in the sophism that men can hear the words of the Lord anywhere.—Jesus Christ did not mean to teach that doctrine when he told the woman at the well, "Neither in this place, nor at Jerusalem, shall men worship the Father;" he merely meant to destroy the idolatry of place, not its consecration; his idea was one of inclusiveness, not of exclusiveness; and his purpose was to show that men could everywhere pray, and that, when compelled to abstain from consecrated places, that compulsion would not interfere with the integrity or prevalence of prayer.—Men can live everywhere, but they can live best at home. Men can express their thoughts in any language, but there will always be about the mother-tongue a tenderness which cannot be communicated by any other. Men can see in other men brothers, but they can see in family likenesses and feel in family sympathies what cannot be found elsewhere.—It is so with religious life in relation to the Church.—The fact that some men are superstitious upon these points must not destroy rational veneration.—So long as the Church preserves the peculiarity of its function, and strenuously endeavours to meet the abiding demands of human instinct and reason, it can never lose its hold upon the confidence of the world.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Parker, Joseph. "Commentary on Joshua 3:9". The People's Bible by Joseph Parker. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jpb/joshua-3.html. 1885-95.