Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 16:2

And he called him and said to him, ‘What is this I hear about you? Give an accounting of your management, for you can no longer be manager.'
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Covetousness;   Dishonesty;   Embezzlement;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Malfeasance in Office;   Probation;   Servant;   Steward;   Worldliness;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Privileges;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Beasts;   Parables;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Parables;   Steward;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies;   Wealth;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Dispensation;   Luke, Gospel of;   Parables;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Steward;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Almsgiving ;   Asceticism (2);   Circumstantiality in the Parables;   Common Life;   Discourse;   Friendship;   Honesty ;   Laughter;   Mammon;   Paradox;   Premeditation;   Property (2);   Spiritualizing of the Parables;   Steward, Stewardship;   Trade and Commerce;   Wealth (2);   Winter ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Give;   How;   Lazarus;   Steward;   Trade;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Give an account of thy, etc. - Produce thy books of receipts and disbursements, that I may see whether the accusation against thee be true or false. The original may be translated, Give up the business, τον λογον, of the stewardship.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-16.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Give an account - Give a statement of your expenses and of your conduct while you have been steward. This is not to be referred to the day of judgment. It is a circumstance thrown into the parable to prepare the way for what follows. It is true that all will be called to give an account at the day of judgment, but we are not to derive that doctrine from such passages as this, nor are we to interpret this as teaching that our conscience, or the law, or any beings will “accuse us” in the day of judgment. All that will be indeed true, but it is not the truth that is taught in this passage.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-16.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And he called him, and said unto him, What is this that I hear of thee? render the account of thy stewardship; for thou canst be no longer steward.

This that I hear ... The accusers of the religious hierarchy were the prophets of God such as Ezekiel (Ezekiel 23:2) and Malachi (Malachi 2:8), and finally, Christ himself (Matthew 23:1-5).

Render the account ... Here is the positive indication that the rich man is a figure of Almighty God. He is the one who summons men to render the account of their earthly lives and possessions.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-16.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he called him,.... By the prophets, sent one after another; by John the Baptist, by Christ himself, and by his apostles:

and said unto him, how is it that I hear this of thee? of thy corrupting the word; of thy covetousness, rapine, and theft; of thy adultery and idolatry, and sad violation of the law; see Romans 2:21

give an account of thy stewardship: what improvement is made of thy gifts; what care has been taken of my vineyard, the Jewish church; and where are the fruits that might be expected to have been received at your hands:

for thou mayest be no longer steward. This was foretold by the prophets, that God would write a "Loammi" upon the people of the Jews; that he would cut off three shepherds in one month, and particularly lay aside the idol shepherd, by whom the Pharisees may be meant, Zechariah 11:8 and by John the Baptist, who declared the axe was laid to the root of the tree, and it was just ready to be cut down, Matthew 3:10 and by Christ, that the kingdom of God should be taken from them, Matthew 21:43 and by the apostles, who turned from them to the Gentiles, Acts 13:46.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-16.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

What is this that I hear? (τι τουτο ακουωti touto akouō̱). There are several ways of understanding this terse Greek idiom. The Revised Version (above) takes τιti to be equal to τι εστιν τουτο ο ακουωti estin touto ho akouō That is a possible use of the predicate τουτοtouto Another way is to take τιti to be exclamatory, which is less likely. Still another view is that τιti is “Why”: “Why do I hear this about thee?” See Acts 14:15 where that is the idiom employed.

Render (αποδοςapodos). Second aorist active imperative of αποδιδωμιapodidōmi Give back (and at once).

The account (τον λογονton logon). The reckoning or report. Common use of λογοςlogos (οικονομιαςoikonomias). Same root as οικονομοςoikonomos (steward). This demand does not necessarily mean dismissal if investigation proved him innocent of the charges. But the reason given implies that he is to be dismissed:

Thou canst no longer (ου γαρ δυνηιou gar dunēi).

d
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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-16.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

How is it that I hear this ( τί τοῦτο ἀκούω )

Better as Rev., What is this that I hear?

Give an account ( ἀπόδος τὸν λόγον )

Lit., “give back ( ἀπό ). Rev., render. The ( τὸν ) account which is due. Aristophanes has a striking parallel: “And now give back my signet; for thou shalt no longer be my steward” (“Knights,” 947).

Thou mayest ( δυνήσῃ )

More strictly, as Rev., thou canst.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-16.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he called him, and said unto him, What is this that I hear of thee1? render the account of thy stewardship; for thou canst be no longer steward2.

  1. What is this that I hear of thee? An indignant expression of surprise arising from abused confidence.

  2. Render the account of thy stewardship; for thou canst be no longer steward. Ordinarily the stewards were slaves; but this was evidently a free man, for he was neither punished nor sold, but discharged.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-16.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Give an account; prepare the accounts for settlement.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-16.html. 1878.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

CALLED TO ACCOUNT

‘Give an account of thy stewardship; for thou mayest be no longer steward.’

Luke 16:2

We call this parable the Parable of the Unjust Steward—i.e. a fraudulent, dishonest steward—and such undoubtedly he did become; but not deliberately dishonest up to the time when his lord called him suddenly to account. He was accused to his lord that he had wasted his goods; not a purposed and continued fraud, but a long-continued faithlessness to his trust. He had forgotten that he was the trustee for his lord’s possessions, and he had lived on neglecting plain duties, until at last the goods began to perish.

The man, then, was guilty of being unfaithful to his trust. And it is this that gives the parable its terrible significance for us.

I. This, then, is the question which each of us has to ask of himself and of his own life: ‘What manner of steward have I been of those things that my Lord has entrusted to me?’ God has given each one of us something to do in His household. Every one of us is, in a larger or smaller degree, a steward of the Lord. Two great gifts of God, at least, are given to every one—Time and Opportunity.

(a) Time—that fleets so swiftly, and so often unheeded, passing by moments and days, and running up to years, bringing life to a close, is God’s great trust to every one of us.

(b) And Opportunity—those moments fraught with blessings and help, or hindrance and evil, to one’s fellow-men, and which may become the means of increasing the Master’s goods or of diminishing them.

II. We have to give an account, sooner or later, to our Lord and Master of how we have used these great gifts, and many another besides; but of these two surely every one of us has to give an account. Think for a moment of the many stewardships we all have from time to time given us; and how these stewardships are terminated—now, at one time, one stewardship, and now, at another time, another.

(a) There is the parent’s stewardship of the child.

(b) The master, the employer, the statesman, the citizen, who fills any place of trust, the parish pastor—all who have any charge, any duties, any power or influence—all these have some great trust of their Lord’s to answer for, and sooner or later there rests upon each the question: ‘Have I been faithful to my stewardship?’

If a man has not kept his Lord’s trust, and has to answer to Him for wasted time and wholly neglected opportunities, how awful must be his account!

—Archbishop Magee.

Illustration

‘In spiritual things, the effective use of stewardship is the being permitted to do true work for God. The joy of success, the joy of safety, the happiness of accomplishments, is solemnised, irradiated by the assurance within the soul of its real and vital union with Christ. “Rejoice not,” Jesus said to His disciples, after successful exercise of ministry, “rejoice not, that the spirits are subject unto you; but rather rejoice because your names are written in heaven.” And then, just as the faithful use of one earthly post finds its reward in opportunities of a greater and wider field of usefulness, so a true use of the trust of earthly life shall one day have its exceeding reward in the greater opportunities of what Jesus called the true riches, even the fuller service and trust of the Kingdom of Heaven. To one who, in giving account of his stewardship, can show an increase in proportion to the trust bestowed, who, receiving five talents, brings other five talents, or having but two talents yet brings other two talents, Christ will say in the day of the final account of all stewardship, “Well done, good and faithful servant.”’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-16.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 And he called him, and said unto him, How is it that I hear this of thee? give an account of thy stewardship; for thou mayest be no longer steward.

Ver. 2. Give an account of thy stewardship] Villicus rationem cum Domino suo crebro putet, said Cato. Stewards should often account with their masters.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-16.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 16:2

We are God's stewards our whole life long: each day of our lives, therefore, claims its own account; each year, as it passes, suggests to us naturally such reflections, since we reckon our life by years. To many thoughtful men their own birthdays have been days of solemn self-examination. To many, the last day of the civil year brings a like reminder. Indeed, popular language recognises in it something of this power.

I. While our life is full of vigour, such anniversaries, however, invite us to look forward as well as backward. The end of an old year is the beginning of a new one. To look back is for a Christian to repent, since the best of us is but a sinner before God; but repentance should bear fruit in new life. And if we have abused God's gifts in the past year, the approaching festival of Christmas with the whole train of holy seasons that follow one after another, and bringing manifold reminders of God's love to man, tells us that there is help in heaven, help ready for us on the earth, if we will even now turn to God and amend our lives. Advent, Christmas, Passiontide, Easter, Ascension Day, are not only thankful commemorations before God of glorious things done for us in past time; they are not only settings forth before man of great events of which we might neglect to read, or read carelessly, in Scripture. They serve to remind us also of a God, ever-living and ever-present, able and willing to renew to us daily those great blessings which our Lord lived and died on earth to win for us all.

II. But as anniversaries multiply upon us, as the years behind us are many, the years to come few in comparison, my text has a meaning for us which deepens continually—a meaning which cannot but force itself on the attention of those who avoid generally serious thoughts. The end of life is in very deed the end of our stewardship. We know little of the existence appointed for us between death and judgment. Little has been told us, except in brief and momentous outline of that which is to come after the Judgment Day. But we have no reason to think that in either there will be room for further probation for use or misuse of gifts and opportunities. As we draw near to the end of this earthly life our thoughts are apt to retrace the space which we have crossed. We find that we have done little, far less than we might have done, because our own indolence made us decline the task, or private aims warped and marred our public action. And yet another question remains which we put to ourselves as we look back on our past life. How have we done our duty to God in it? Ability to know God and to serve Him is one portion assuredly of our stewardship; and as we draw near to the end of life, we cannot but ask ourselves how we have used it. We alone know—I do not say that we ourselves know perfectly—whether we have sought to draw near to God, to know, serve, and love Him in real earnest. In the retrospect of which I have been speaking, there is more of sadness and less of hope. Little time, little opportunity, remain for amendment. But there is hope for us still. God's love, God's mercy, is inexhaustible. Humbly, trustfully, lovingly, we must cast all our sins before the throne and commit ourselves to God's mercy in the Name of Him who heard and accepted the thief upon the cross.

Archdeacon Palmer, Oxford and Cambridge Journal, Dec. 4th, 1879.

References: Luke 16:2.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. iv., No. 192; E. Cooper, Practical Sermons, vol. i., p. 64; F. O. Morris, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xvii., p. 276; Preacher's Monthly, vol. iv., p. 91; H. J. Wilmot-Buxton, The Life of Duty, vol. ii., p. 77; H. P. Liddon, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxxii., p. 353. Luke 16:3.—Homiletic Magazine, vol. xiii., p. 111. Luke 16:5.—J. M. Neale, Occasional Sermons, p. 132. Luke 16:5-7.—Ibid., Sermons in a Religious House, 2nd series, part i., 231.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-16.html.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

2. τί τοῦτο] It makes very little difference either in admissibility of construction or of sense, whether we render, ‘why do I hear this of thee?’ i.e. ‘what is the ground of this report?—what occasion hast thou given for this being brought to me?’ or, ‘What is this that I hear of thee?’ i.e. ‘give some account of it.’ There is the same ambiguity in Mark 11:3, τί ποιεῖτε τοῦτο; I prefer rather the former, because no opportunity of explanation what it is, is given him, but he is commanded to produce his books, to shew how it has arisen.

ἀπόδος] give up the account of thy stewardship; for (taking for granted the correctness of the report, the steward not denying it) thou wilt not be able to retain thy stewardship any longer,—in ordinary English, thou canst not, &c.

οὐ δύνῃ—in the nature of thingsthou art precluded from.

The interpretation of this announcement to the steward, is the certainty, spoken by God in every one of our consciences, that we must give up and give an account of our stewardship at death. The great truth lies in the background, that that dismissal, death itself, is the consequence of the διασκορπίζειν τὰ ὑπάρχοντα αὐτοῦ,—the wages of sin.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-16.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 16:2. τί τοῦτο ἀκούω περὶ σοῦ;] what is this that I hear concerning thee? quid hoc est, quod de te audio? A well-known contraction of a relative clause with an interrogative clause; Plat. Gorg. p. 452 D, and elsewhere. See Kühner, II. § 841. 1; Fritzsche, ad Marc. p. 780; Bornemann, Schol. p. 97, and in the Stud. u. Krit. 1843, p. 120. Comp. Test. XII. Patr. p. 715: τί ταῦτα ἀκούω; Acts 14:15. The frequency of this usus loquendi, and the appropriateness of the sense just at the opening of the reckoning, gives to the interpretation the preference over this: wherefore do I hear, etc., Kuinoel, de Wette, Meuss, and others (comp. Luther, and so early as the Gothic version).

ἀπόδος κ. τ. λ.] give the (due) reckoning of thy stewardship. The master desires to see the state of affairs made plain. On λόγον διδόναι, ἀποδιδόναι (Matthew 12:36; Acts 19:40; Romans 14:12), see Schweighäuser’s Lex. Herod. II. p. 74. Comp. τὸν λόγον ἀπῄτουν, Dem. 868. 5.

οὐ γάρ] for thou shalt not, etc. The master decides thus according to what he had heard, and what he regards as established.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-16.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 16:2. τί τοῦτο, what is this?) The rich man speaks as if something had happened which he was not expecting. This implies that God puts trust in man.— ἀκούω, I hear) from the complaints which have been made to Me concerning thee. God is represented as hearing of his proceedings, as if He did not see them Himself. Thus the steward was left to himself.(166)τὸν λόγον) the account [‘libellum,’ the account-book].

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-16.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 16:1"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 16:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-16.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

ты не можешь более управлять Объявляя о своем намерении уволить этого человека, хозяин действовал неразумно, и это ему обошлось еще дороже. Очевидно, он полагал, что виною управляющего была его некомпетентность, а не обман. Этим объясняется его реакция в ст. 8.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-16.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Riches and all the blessings which men possess come from God and belong to him. With them men, as his stewards, are intrusted for a season. For the use of them they must give account, and they will be treated according to their works.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-16.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“And he called him, and said to him, ‘What is this that I hear about you? Render the account of your stewardship, for you can no longer be steward.’ ”

The landlord thus calls for him to come to see him and explains what he has heard about him. Then he tells him that he is intending to replace him and that he should therefore prepare accounts revealing the details of his stewardship. The impression given is that he is simply being replaced for mismanagement, not for open dishonesty. There is no suggestion of any action being taken against him, but the estate manager’s silence indicates that he is aware that there is truth in the charges.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-16.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2.Be no longer steward—The voice of death is imperious; for it is the decree of God himself.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-16.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

There is no indication in the parable whether the agent failed his master innocently or deliberately. That is unimportant. For whatever reason his boss fired him and asked him to turn in his account books that would show what he had done (cf. Matthew 12:36; Acts 19:40; Hebrews 13:17; 1 Peter 4:5).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-16.html. 2012.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 16:2. , etc. may be exclamatory = what! do I hear this of thee? or interrogatory: what is this that I hear of thee? the laconic phrase containing a combination of an interrogative with a relative clause.— : the reference may be either to a final account previous to dismissal, already resolved on (so usually taken), or to an investigation into the truth or falsehood of the accusation = produce your books that I may judge for myself (so Hahn). The latter would be the reasonable course, but not necessarily the one taken by an eastern magnate, who might rush from absolute confidence to utter distrust without taking the trouble to inquire further. As the story runs, this seems to be what happened.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-16.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

And he called him, &c. Such are the words which our Lord daily addresses to us. We daily see persons equally healthy, and likely to live as ourselves, suddenly summoned by death, to give an account of their stewardship. Happy summons to the faithful servant, who has reason to hope in his faithful administration. Not so to the unfaithful steward, whose pursuits are earthly: death to him is terrible indeed, and his exit is filled with sorrow. All thunder-stricken at these words, "now thou canst be steward no longer," he says within himself, what shall I do! (St. Thomas Aquinas)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-16.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

How is it . . . ? = What is this . . ?

of = concerning. Greek. peri. App-104. Not the same word as in Luke 16:9.

give = render.

an = the.

stewardship = the office of the steward (Luke 16:1).

mayest = canst.

no. Greek. ou. App-105.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-16.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he called him, and said unto him, How is it that I hear this of thee? give an account of thy stewardship; for thou mayest be no longer steward.

And he called him, and said unto him, How is it that I hear this of thee? And thus does God from time to time-now by startling providences, and now in the secret whispers of conscience-charge home its abuse of gifts, and manifold guilt, very sharply upon the soul.

Give an account of thy stewardship - render up whatever has been entrusted to thee, that I may transfer it to other hands, "for thou mayest be no longer steward."

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-16.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) How is it that I hear this of thee?—(1) The opening words of the steward’s master imply wonder as well as indignation. They remind us so far of the words of the lord of the vineyard in another parable, “Wherefore, when I looked that it should bring forth grapes, brought it forth wild grapes?” (Isaiah 5:4). Speaking after the manner of men, it was a marvel and a mystery that men with so high a calling as the scribes and teachers of Israel should have proved so unfaithful to their trust. (2) The words that follow, “Give an account of thy stewardship; for thou mayest be no longer steward,” while they admit legitimately enough a personal application to each individual at the close of any period of trust and probation, and therefore at the close of life, are yet far from being limited to that application, and in their primary significance, do not even admit it. The close of a stewardship, for a party like the Pharisees—for a school like that of the scribes—for any Church or section of a Church—is when its day of judgment comes, when its work in the Kingdom is done, when history, and God in history, pass their sentence upon it. And that day of judgment was coming fast upon those who then heard the parable.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-16.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he called him, and said unto him, How is it that I hear this of thee? give an account of thy stewardship; for thou mayest be no longer steward.
How
Genesis 3:9-11; 4:9,10; 18:20,21; 1 Samuel 2:23,24; 1 Corinthians 1:11; 1 Timothy 5:24
give
12:42; Ecclesiastes 11:9,10; 12:14; Matthew 12:36; Romans 14:12; 1 Corinthians 4:2,5; 2 Corinthians 5:10; 1 Peter 4:5,10; 1 Timothy 4:14; Revelation 20:12
for
12:20; 19:21-26
Reciprocal: Genesis 40:20 - lifted up;  Genesis 47:14 - Joseph brought;  Job 15:29 - neither shall;  Job 21:16 - Lo;  Proverbs 18:9 - is brother;  Daniel 6:2 - that;  Hosea 2:8 - her corn;  Matthew 13:12 - from;  Matthew 18:23 - which;  Matthew 20:8 - unto;  Matthew 25:19 - reckoneth;  Luke 8:18 - from;  Luke 10:42 - which;  Luke 12:48 - For;  Luke 19:15 - that he;  Luke 19:24 - Take;  Luke 19:25 - Lord;  Acts 5:9 - How;  1 Corinthians 7:31 - use;  Hebrews 13:17 - give account;  James 3:1 - knowing;  James 4:3 - ye may

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 16:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-16.html.