Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 18:38

And he called out, saying, "Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Bartimeus (Bartimaeus);   Faith;   Jesus, the Christ;   Miracles;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Prayer, Answers to;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Bartimeus;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jericho;   Messiah;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hearing the Word of God;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Jericho;   Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Bartimaeus ;   Beggar;   Names and Titles of Christ;   Physician (2);   Pilgrim (2);   Son of David;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Miracles;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bartim us;   Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Jericho;  

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he cried, saying, Jesus thou son of David,.... Believing him, at once, to be the Messiah; whence he calls him the son of David, which was a character and title of the Messiah, well known to the Jews; See Gill on Matthew 1:1 and therefore immediately called out unto him, being willing to take that opportunity as he passed, and whilst he was within hearing, to make his suit to him for his sight:

saying, have mercy on me: a poor, blind, and miserable creature, and restore me to my sight, which will be an act of singular mercy, and goodness, and will always be gratefully owned as such.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-18.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

son of David, etc. — (See on Matthew 12:23).

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-18.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

He cried (εβοησενeboēsen). Old verb, βοαωboaō to shout, as in Luke 9:38.

Son of David (υιε Δαυειδhuie Daueid). Shows that he recognizes Jesus as the Messiah.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-18.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he cried, saying, Jesus, thou son of David, have mercy on me1.

  1. Jesus, thou son of David, have mercy on me. See .

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-18.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 18:38. υἱὲ δαυὶδ, Son of David) The faith of the blind man is not offended, because the Saviour was called “Jesus of Nazareth.”

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-18.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 18:36"

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 18:38". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-18.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Сын Давидов Подтверждение того, что он признал в Иисусе Мессию и Царя. См. пояснение к Мф. 9:27.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-18.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And he cried, saying, “Jesus, you son of David, have mercy on me.” ’

Knowing something of Jesus by reputation the blind man saw his main chance. This was perhaps the first time that he had actually been in the same place as Jesus. And he called out to Him for help.

‘Jesus, you son of David.’ It is possible that, knowing of Jesus connection with the royal house, he simply meant this to be flattering, but it is far more probable that he meant more, and that he saw Jesus as Messianic, and used a local Messianic title. Yet as the crowd did not react to the name (their rebuke was because they thought he was making a disturbance and trying to beg from Jesus) and as Jesus made no comment, it is not likely that the crowd as a whole saw it as Messianic. But that need not mean that the man himself did not. He may well have been visiting Judea for the Passover from an area where such a title was used of the Messiah. Luke also probably sees it as significant. Here was prophetic recognition, whether conscious or subconscious, of Who Jesus really was, made on His approach to Jerusalem to die and rise again. And he probably saw it as significant that He was welcomed by a blind man in such terms when those who could see were oblivious of the fact.

‘Son of David.’ This was certainly a Messianic title in later Jewish literature, but the only known such reference in pre-Christian literature was in the Psalms of Solomon Luke 17:23. It may thus have been a marginal rather than a popular Messianic title in Jesus’ time. Perhaps then its popular use was localised in parts of Galilee, and the blind man was from that locality taking advantage of a key route to Jerusalem before the Passover. The coming of a son of David as deliverer was certainly a common idea in the Old Testament (Isaiah 9:6-7; Isaiah 11:1-10; Jeremiah 23:5-6; Ezekiel 34:23 and recognised in certain Psalms), and the crowds in Matthew 12:23 appear to have used it Messianically, as do two blind men in probably the same locality (Matthew 9:27), all of whom were in Galilee. This would support a Galilean locale. See also Luke 1:27; Luke 1:32; 2 Samuel 7:8-16.

Matthew 21:9; Matthew 21:15 may have been a more general use in typical Passover welcomes, or the result of visitors from the locality where it was used, the children in Luke 18:15 having picked it up from the crowd. The use of it by the Syrophoenician woman (Matthew 15:22) was probably a polite title to Him as a Jew, son of David meaning a Jew (compare ‘our father David’ in Mark 11:10; Acts 4:25). That the Messiah would be the son of David was certainly recognised by the scribes (Luke 12:35) although that does not guarantee the use of the title by them at this stage.

So we must probably see it as a fairly peripheral Messianic title and as a good possibility that the blind man was hailing Him as Messiah in Galilean terms without the crowd on the whole recognising his intention.

The crowd here would largely have consisted of local inhabitants crowding the route taken by Passover pilgrims, although those on the road would also have included pilgrims from Galilee and elsewhere. None, however, appear to have reacted to the title which, had it been understood generally as Messianic, would have been surprising in view of the excitement which would be generated by the approach of Passover. On the other hand the Passover crowds who later hailed Jesus on His entry into Jerusalem would be mixed and would probably contain a large Galilean element.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-18.html. 2013.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 18:38. : aorist, he cried out once.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-18.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

cried = called out.

Son of David. App-98. Compare the call of the other men (App-152).

mercy = pity.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-18.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he cried, saying, Jesus, thou Son of David, have mercy on me.

And he cried, saying, Jesus, son of David, in other words, 'Thou promised Messiah.' That this was the understood sense of the phrase is evident from the acclamation with which the multitude greeted Him on his triumphal entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:9; see also Matthew 12:23).

Have mercy on me!

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-18.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he cried, saying, Jesus, thou Son of David, have mercy on me.
Jesus
Psalms 62:12; Isaiah 9:6,7; 11:1; Jeremiah 23:5; Matthew 9:27; 12:23; 15:22; 21:9,15; Matthew 22:42-45; Romans 1:3; Revelation 22:16
Reciprocal: Proverbs 19:7 - he;  Luke 17:13 - have;  Luke 20:41 - Christ

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 18:38". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-18.html.