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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Mark 14:62

And Jesus said, "I am; and you shall see THE SON OF MAN SITTING AT THE RIGHT HAND OF POWER, and COMING WITH THE CLOUDS OF HEAVEN."

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And Jesus, said, I am: and ye shall see the Son of man sitting at the right hand of Power, and coming with the clouds of heaven.

When this writer was a boy 15 years of age, he received from his mother a copy of the New Testament as a birthday gift, and the thrill of this verse is remembered from that day. I read the New Testament through, but there was wonderment about the passages in Matthew where Jesus had said, "Thou hast said"; and then came the reading of this majestic reply and the flood of tears that followed. God spoke to me in this verse!

I AM ... These words affirm Christ's deity, the same as in John 18:8; and here also is the explanation of the different form of reply here, as compared with Matthew 26:83. There the question was indirectly stated, "Tell us whether, etc.," and could not be answered by the majestic I AM, as here. Not only Mark's "again" in Mark 14:61, but the fact of Caiaphas' first question being indirect, and the question here being direct, afford undeniable proof of the multiple nature of the questions and replies in these passages. Christ's I AM here lays claim to Godhead.

Sitting at the right hand of Power and coming with the clouds of heaven ... refers to the final judgment when all men shall stand before the throne of God for sentencing. It was astounding that Christ would here transfer the thought from that prejudiced and corrupted court to the Great Assize where all shall receive justice and they that are Christ's shall receive mercy.

Ye shall see ... The Sanhedrin, along with all who ever lived, shall see the event foretold by Jesus. The ridiculous notion that Jesus here envisioned some sudden glorious coming that would "convince" these hypocrites, and that he predicted that they would, in their lifetime, see such a thing has utterly no foundation in this passage. As Cranfield saw the meaning here:

They will see the Son of Man when he comes as Judge - possibly indeed during their lifetimes, but equally possible after their deaths, when they are raised up for the last judgment ... Henceforth they will not see him at all till they see him in his glory.[5]

ENDNOTE:

[5] Ibid., p. 445.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/mark-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Jesus said, I am,.... That is, the Son of God; in proof of which he adds,

and ye shall see the son of man sitting on the right hand of power; that is, of God, who is all power, the Lord God Almighty:

and coming in the clouds of heaven; either at the destruction of Jerusalem, or at the last day, referring to the prophecy in Daniel 7:13; See Gill on Matthew 26:64.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/mark-14.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

And Jesus said, I am — or, as in Matthew (Matthew 26:64), “Thou hast said [it].” In Luke, however (Luke 22:70), the answer, “Ye say that I am,” should be rendered - as Deuteronomy Wette, Meyer, Ellicott, and the best critics agree that the preposition requires - “Ye say [it], for I am [so].” Some words, however, were spoken by our Lord before giving His answer to this solemn question. These are recorded by Luke alone (Luke 22:67, Luke 22:68): “Art Thou the Christ [they asked]? tell us. And He said unto them, If I tell you, ye will not believe: and if I also ask [interrogate] “you, ye will not answer Me, nor let Me go.” This seems to have been uttered before giving His direct answer, as a calm remonstrance and dignified protest against the prejudgment of His case and the unfairness of their mode of procedure. But now let us hear the rest of the answer, in which the conscious majesty of Jesus breaks forth from behind the dark cloud which overhung Him as He stood before the Council. (Also see on John 18:28.)

and — in that character.

ye shall see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven — In Matthew (Matthew 26:64) a slightly different but interesting turn is given to it by one word: “Thou hast said [it]: nevertheless” - We prefer this sense of the word to “besides,” which some recent critics decide for - “I say unto you, Hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sit on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven.” The word rendered “hereafter” means, not “at some future time” (as to-day “hereafter” commonly does), but what the English word originally signified, “after here,” “after now,” or “from this time.” Accordingly, in Luke 22:69, the words used mean “from now.” So that though the reference we have given it to the day of His glorious Second Appearing is too obvious to admit of doubt, He would, by using the expression, “From this time,” convey the important thought which He had before expressed, immediately after the traitor left the supper table to do his dark work, “Now is the Son of man glorified” (John 13:31). At this moment, and by this speech, did He “witness the good confession” emphatically and properly, as the apostle says in 1 Timothy 6:13. Our translators render the words there, “Who before Pontius Pilate witnessed”; referring it to the admission of His being a King, in the presence of Caesar‘s own chief representative. But it should be rendered, as Luther renders it, and as the best interpreters now understand it, “Who under Pontius Pilate witnessed,” etc. In this view of it, the apostle is referring not to what our Lord confessed before Pilate - which, though noble, was not of such primary importance - but to that sublime confession which, under Pilate‘s administration, He witnessed before the only competent tribunal on such occasions, the Supreme Ecclesiastical Council of God‘s chosen nation, that He was THE MESSIAH, and THE SON OF THE BLESSED ONE; in the former word owning His Supreme Official, in the latter His Supreme Personal, Dignity.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/mark-14.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I am (εγο ειμιego eimi). Matthew has it, “Thou hast said,” which is the equivalent of the affirmative. But Mark‘s statement is definite beyond controversy. See notes on Matthew 26:64-68 for the claims of Jesus and the conduct of Caiaphas.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/mark-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

I am

See on Matthew 26:64.


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The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/mark-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

And Jesus said, I am1: and ye shall see the Son of man sitting at the right hand of Power2, and coming with the clouds of heaven.

  1. And Jesus said, I am. Jesus freely confessed the truth which his church is called upon to confess.

  2. And ye shall see the Son of man sitting at the right hand of Power. Jesus brings the present state of humiliation into contrast with his future state of glory. "On the right hand of power" was commonly understood to mean the right hand of God. As hard as it might be for them to believe it, the day would come when he should sit in judgment and they should stand on trial before him.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/mark-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

62 And Jesus said, I am: and ye shall see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven.

Ver. 62. {See Trapp on "Matthew 24:30"} {See Trapp on "Luke 22:70"} {See Trapp on "Luke 22:71"}


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/mark-14.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

62.] The ἀπʼ ἄρτι of Matt., and ἀπο τοῦ νῦν of Luke, are here omitted.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/mark-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

[62. ἐγώ ἐιμι, I am) Jesus, when His enemies spake false witness against Him, and when His disciples withdrew themselves from the confession of the truth, Himself made an open profession of the truth.—V. g.]


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/mark-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Mark 14:53"


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Mark 14:62". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/mark-14.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

62. Ἐγώ εἰμι. Jesus admits the right of the high-priest to ask this question and replies at once. For the first time in this Gospel He publicly declares in full and solemn language Who He is. The reference to Daniel 7:13 would be understood by those present. Mt. gives the less definite reply Σὺ εἶπας, “That was thy saying,” which might be assent, or denial, or neutral, according to circumstances. Cf. Mark 15:2. Here what follows shows that, if Σὺ εἶπας was the expression used, it was equivalent to Ἐγώ εἰμι.

τὸν υἱὸντῆς δυνάμεως. These words are in all three. They tell the Sanhedrin that a day will come when the positions will be reversed and He will be passing sentence on them (Revelation 1:7). In τῆς δυνάμεως we have another substitute for the Divine Name. Dalman, Words, pp. 200, 306–308.

μετὰ τῶν νεφελῶν. See on Mark 13:24; Mark 13:26. The clouds are doubtless symbolical. Such symbolism was part of the mental furniture of a Jew, although some Jews may have understood the symbols literally.

Early in the Ministry Christ had begun to give a partial revelation of His Messianic character by calling Himself “the Son of Man”; He had given clearer intimations in private to the Twelve; He had accepted Peter’s confession of His Messiahship; He had refused to rebuke those who had publicly proclaimed Him as the Messianic King at the triumphal entry; and now before the Sanhedrin and before Pilate He acknowledges His full right to the title. To Pilate He explains that He is no earthly king, no rival of the Emperor. No explanation of His Kingship or of His Sonship is given to the hierarchy. They knew the import of His words, as the action of the high-priest shows.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Mark 14:62". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/mark-14.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

62. And Jesus said, I am — Seldom in the course of his ministry did our Lord announce himself as the Messiah. But here, in the great and trying moment, when questioned by the Jewish nation, in the person of their high priest, solemnly, Are you the MESSIAH? to the Jewish nation he returns the solemn reply, I am.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/mark-14.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘The Blessed.’ An indirect reference to God.

‘And Jesus said, “I am. And you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of power and coming in the clouds of heaven.”

In Mark His ‘I am’ is a direct Messianic claim, and more. Matthew 26:64 and Luke 22:70 make the reply more indirect as do some important authorities here - ‘you say that I am’. But it is the expression that is different. The essence is the same. Jesus did not deny His Messiahship by either answer. Mark simply translates very positively. That he is justified comes out in the following words.

‘You will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of power (i.e. of God).’ This is a reference to Psalms 110:1. Here was a direct claim to be God’s ‘right hand man’ as sovereign over the world, based on a Psalm that was seen as Messianic. And He further declares that this would happen to Him as ‘the Son of Man’.

‘The son of man --- coming on the clouds of heaven.’ See Daniel 7:13 where it refers to the representative of Israel coming into the presence of God to receive an everlasting throne. There are no grounds for seeing this as referring to the second coming, an idea which would have been foreign to those present. They would rightly have seen it as signifying His approach to God to be enthroned and glorified. (Matthew’s ‘from now on ---’ (Matthew 26:64) specifically excludes it from referring to the second coming). Here then is a further claim that He is to receive kingship, authority and glory from God

So Jesus’ claim was that as Son of Man He was about to share God’s authority and be exalted as ruler of the world and as God’s representative King. He was to be a heavenly Messiah. And in Matthew and Luke He further claimed that this would become apparent to them - ‘you shall see’ - as His Kingly Rule was exercised. This went beyond the idea of the earthly Messiah ruling over the world. It was a claim to divine exaltation.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/mark-14.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Previously Jesus had veiled His messiahship because publicly claiming to be the Messiah would have precipitated a premature crisis (cf. Mark 1:43-44; Mark 8:29-30; Mark 9:9; Mark 11:28-33; Mark 12:12). Now He openly admitted His messiahship because the time for crisis had arrived. Matthew may have given us Jesus" exact words ( Matthew 26:64) and Mark their substance. Jesus added that He was not just a human Messiah but the divine Son of Man. The passages He claimed to fulfill predicted His enthronement in heaven following His resurrection ( Psalm 110:1) and His return to earth with God"s authority to establish a worldwide kingdom ( Daniel 7:13-14; cf. Mark 8:38; Mark 13:24; Mark 13:26; Revelation 1:7). As such He was claiming to be the Judge of those who sat to judge Him. Jesus knew that this confession would seal His conviction. "Power" was a recognized circumlocution for "God." [Note: Ibid, p537.]


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/mark-14.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Mark 14:62. I am. Any allusion to the significant name of God: ‘I Am’ (Exodus 3:14), is very improbable. Comp. ‘Thou hast said’ (Matthew). ‘From henceforth’ is omitted here. See notes on Matthew 26:64.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/mark-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Mark 14:62. ἐγώ εἰμι. On Christ’s reply to the high priest affirming the Messianic claim, vide notes on Mt.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/mark-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

am I am [He] See John 4:26; John 8:28, John 8:58; each time followed by extraordinary effects. See John 18:6.

see. Greek. opsomai. App-138.

the Son of man. The last occurance of this title (App-98) in Mark. The first is Mark 2:10.

on = at. Greek. ek. App-104. Not the same word as in verses: Mark 14:2, Mark 14:3, Mark 14:6, Mark 2:35, Mark 2:46

power. Greek dunamis. App-172. Put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of Adjunct), App-6, for Jehovah Who exercises it, and that in judgment,

in = amid. Greek. meta. App-104. Not the same word as in verses: Mark 14:3, Mark 14:20, Mark 14:25, Mark 3:30, Mark 3:49, Mark 3:60, Mark 3:69.

heaven = the heavens. See note on Matthew 6:9, Matthew 6:10.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/mark-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Jesus said, I am: and ye shall see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven.

And Jesus said, I am - or, as in Matthew 26:64, "Thou hast said [it]." In Luke, however (Luke 22:70), the answer, "Ye say that I am" [ Humeis (Greek #5210) legete (Greek #3004), hoti (Greek #3754) egoo (Greek #1473) eimi (Greek #1510)], should be rendered-as DeWette, Meyer, Ellicott, and the best critics agree that the preposition requires-`Ye say [it], for I am [so].' Some words, however, were spoken by our Lord before giving His answer to this solemn question. These are recorded by Luke alone (Luke 22:67-68): "Art thou the Christ (they asked)? tell us. And He said unto them, If I tell you, ye will not believed: and if I also ask" - or 'interrogate' [ erooteesoo (Greek #2065)] "you, ye will not answer me, nor let me go." This seems to have been uttered before giving His direct answer, as a calm remonstrance and dignified protest against the prejudgment of His case and the unfairness of their mode of procedure. But now let us hear the rest of the answer, in which the conscious majesty of Jesus breaks forth from behind the dark cloud which overhung Him as He stood before the Council.

And (in that character) ye shall see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven. In Matthew (Matthew 26:64) a slightly different but interesting turn is given to it by one word: "Thou hast said [it]: nevertheless" - We prefer this sense of the word [ pleen (Greek #4133)] to 'besides,' which some recent critics decide for - "I say unto you, Hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sit on the right hand, of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven:" 'I know the scorn with which ye are ready to meet such an avowal: To your eyes, which are but eyes of flesh, there stands at this bar only a mortal like yourselves, and he at the mercy of the ecclesiastical and civil authorities: Nevertheless, a day is coming when ye shall see another sight: those eyes, which now gaze on me with proud disdain, shall see this very prisoner at the right hand of the Majesty on high, and coming in the clouds of heaven.

Then shall the Judged One be revealed as the Judge, and His judges in this chamber appear at His august tribunal: then shall the unrighteous judges be impartially judged; and while they are wishing that they had never been born, He for whom they now watch as their Victim shall be greeted with the hallelujahs of heaven and the welcome of Him that sitteth upon the Throne!' The word rendered "hereafter" [ ap' (Greek #575) arti (Greek #737)] means, not 'at some future time' (as now "hereafter" commonly does), but what the English word originally signified, 'after here,' 'after now,' or 'from this time.' Accordingly, in Luke 22:69, the words used [ apo (Greek #575) tou (Greek #3588) nun (Greek #3568)] mean 'from now.' So that though the reference we have given it to the day of His glorious Second Appearing is too obvious to admit of doubt, He would, by using the expression, 'From this time,' convey the important thought which He had before expressed, immediately after the traitor left the supper table to do his dark work, "Now is the Son of Man glorified" (John 13:31).

At this moment, and by this speech, did He "witness the good confession" [ teen (Greek #3588) kaleen (Greek #2570) homologian (Greek #3671)], emphatically and properly, as the apostle says, 1 Timothy 6:13. Our translators render the words there, "Who before Pontius Pilate witnessed;" referring it to the admission of His being a King, in the presence of Caesar's own chief representative. But it should be rendered, as Luther renders it, and as the best interpreters now understand it, 'Who under Pontius Pilate witnessed, etc. [Compare the sense of epi (Greek #1909) tinos (Greek #5100) in such passages as Matthew 1:11; Mark 2:26; Luke 3:2; Acts 11:28; as also in the Apostles' Creed - "suffered under Pontius Pilate."] In this view of it, the apostle is referring not to what our Lord confessed before Pilate-which, though noble, was not of such primary importance-but to that sublime confession which, under Pilate's administration, He witnessed before the only competent tribunal on such occasions, the Supreme Ecclesiastical Council of God's chosen nation, that He was THE MESSIAH, and THE SON OF THE BLESSED ONE in the former word owning His Supreme Official, in the latter His Supreme Personal Dignity.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/mark-14.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Jesus said, I am: and ye shall see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven.
I am
15:2; Matthew 26:64; 27:11; Luke 23:3
the Son
The passage of Daniel, to which our Lord refers, was always considered by the Jews as a description of the Messiah. Our Saviour, therefore, now in his lowest state of humiliation, asserted his claims as the Messiah, who shall appear in the clouds of heaven, as the judge of the world.
13:26; 16:19; Psalms 110:1; Daniel 7:13,14; Matthew 24:30; Luke 22:69; Acts 1:9-11; 2 Thessalonians 1:7-10; Hebrews 1:3; 8:1,10,12,13; 12:2; Revelation 1:7; 20:11

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Mark 14:62". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/mark-14.html.

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Monday, November 18th, 2019
the Week of Proper 28 / Ordinary 33
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