corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.20.06.03
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Matthew 11:30

"For My yoke is easy and My burden is light."

Adam Clarke Commentary

For my yoke is easy - My Gospel imposes nothing that is difficult; on the contrary, it provides for the complete removal of all that which oppresses and renders man miserable, viz. sin. The commandments of Christ are not grievous. Hear the whole: Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and thy neighbor as thyself. Can any thing be more congenial to the nature of man than love? - such a love as is inspired by God, and in which the soul rests supremely satisfied and infinitely happy? Taste, and know, by experience, how good the Lord is, and how worthy his yoke is to be taken, borne, and loved. This most tender invitation of the compassionate Jesus is sufficient to inspire the most diffident soul with confidence. See on Mark 8:34; (note).

Creeshna, the incarnate God of the Hindoos, is represented in the Geeta addressing one of his beloved disciples thus: "I am the creator of all things, and all things proceed from me. Those who are endued with spiritual wisdom, believe this, and worship me: their very hearts and minds are in me; they rejoice among themselves, and delight in speaking of my name, and teaching one another my doctrine. I gladly inspire those who are constantly employed in my service with that use of reason by which they come unto me; and, in compassion, I stand in my own nature, and dissipate the darkness of their ignorance with the light of the lamp of wisdom." Bhagvat Geeta, p. 84.

The word עול aval, among the Jews, which we properly enough translate yoke, signified not only that sort of neck-harness by which bullocks drew in wagons, carts, or in the plough; but also any kind of bond, or obligation, to do some particular thing, or to do some particular work. By them it is applied to the following things: -

  1. The yoke of the Kingdom of heaven, השמים מלכות עול obedience to the revealed will of God.
  • The yoke of the Law, הורה עול the necessity of obeying all the rites, ceremonies, etc., of the Mosaic institution.
  • The yoke of the Precept, מצוה עול the necessity of performing that particular obligation by which any person had bound himself, such as that of the Nazarite, etc.
  • The yoke of Repentance, השוכה של עול without which, they knew, they could not enter into the kingdom of heaven. With the Jews, repentance not only implied forsaking sin, but fasting, mortification, etc.
  • The yoke of Faith, אמונה עול the necessity of believing in the promised Messiah.
  • The Divine yoke, רלעילא עול the obligation to live a spiritual life; a life of thanksgiving and gratitude unto God.
  • In Shemoth Rabba it is said: "Because the ten tribes did not take the yoke of the holy and blessed God upon them, therefore Sennacherib led them into captivity."

    Christ's yoke means, the obligation to receive him as the Messiah, to believe his doctrine, and to be in all things conformed to his Word and to his Spirit.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.

    Bibliography
    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/matthew-11.html. 1832.

    Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

    My yoke is easy … - That is, the services that I shall require are easily rendered. They are not burdensome, like all other systems of religion. So the Christian always finds them. In coming to him there is “a peace which passeth all understanding;” in believing in him, “joy;” in following him “through evil and good report,” a comfort “which the world giveth not;” in bearing trials and in persecution, “the hope of glory;” and in keeping his commandments, great reward.

    Remarks On Matthew 11:2-3. John was solicitous to ascertain his true character, and nothing is of more importance for all than to understand his true character. Upon him depends all the hope that man has of happiness beyond the grave. He saves, or man must perish. “He” will save, or we must die forever. With what earnestness, therefore, should the old and the young inquire into his character. Our eternal all demands it; and while this is delayed, we are endangering our everlasting felicity.

    2. Clear proof has been furnished that Jesus is the Christ and can save us, Matthew 11:4-5. If his miracles did not prove that he came from God, nothing can prove it. If he could open the eyes of the blind, then he can enlighten the sinner; if he could unstop the ears of the deaf, then he can cause us to hear and live; if he could heal the sick, and make the lame walk, then he can heal our spiritual maladies, and make us walk in the way of life; if he could raise the dead, then he can raise those dead in sin, and breathe into us the breath of eternal life. If he was willing to do all this for the body which is soon to perish, then he will be much more willing to do it for the soul, that never dies. Then the poor, lost sinner may come and live.

    3. We see in this chapter Christ‘s manner of praising or complimenting men, Matthew 11:7-15. He gave, in no measured terms, his exalted opinion of John - gave him praise which had been bestowed on no other mortal ranked him far above the purest and sublimest of the prophets. But this was not done in the presence of John, “nor was it done in the presence of those who would inform John of it.” It was when the disciples of John had “departed,” and his commendation of John was spoken to “the multitude,” Matthew 11:7. He waited until his disciples were gone, apprehending, doubtless, that they would be likely to report what he said in praise of their master, and then expressed his high opinion of his character. The practice of the world is to praise others to their faces, or in the presence of those who will be sure to inform them of it, and to speak evil of them when absent. Jesus delivered his unfavorable opinions of others to the people themselves; their excellences he took pains to commend where they would not be likely to hear of them. He did good to both, and in both prevented the existence of pride.

    4. The wicked take much pains, and are often fickle and inconsistent, for the sake of abusing and calumniating religious people, Matthew 11:18-19. They found much fault with the Saviour for doing the very same thing which they blamed John for not doing. So it is commonly with people who slander professors of religion. They risk their own characters, to prove that others are hypocrites or sinners. The object is not truth, but calumny and opposition to religion; and hitherto no means have been too base or too wicked to pour contempt on the followers of Christ.

    5. The purest characters may expect the shaft of calumny and malice, and often in proportion to their purity, Matthew 11:19. Even the Saviour of the world was accused of being intemperate and a glutton. If the only perfectly pure being that ever trod the earth was thus accused, let not his followers think that any strange thing has happened to them if they are falsely accused.

    6. Judgments will overtake guilty people, and cities, and nations, Matthew 11:21-22. They fell on Sodom, Tyre, Sidon, and Capernaum. They may long linger; but in due time the hand of God will fall on the wicked, and they will die - forever die.

    7. The wicked will suffer in proportion to their privileges, Matthew 11:23-24. So it was with Capernaum. And if they of ancient days suffered thus; if more tremendous judgments fell on them than even on guilty Sodom, what shall be the doom of those who go down to hell from this day of light? The Saviour was indeed there a few days; he worked a few miracles; but they had not, as we have, all his instructions; they had not Sunday schools, and Bible classes, and the stated preaching of the gospel, nor was the world blessed then, as now, with extensive and powerful revivals of religion. How awful must be the doom of those who are educated in the ways of religion - who are instructed from Sabbath to Sabbath - who grow up amid the means of grace - and then are lost!

    8. The poor and needy; the weary and heavy-ladened; the soul sick of sin and of the world; the sinner conscious of guilt and afraid to die, may come to Jesus Christ and live, Matthew 11:28-30. The invitation is wide as the world. The child and the old man may seek and find salvation at the feet of the same Saviour. No child is too young; no man is too old: no one is too great a sinner. Christ is “full” of mercy, and all who come shall find peace. O how should we, in this sinful and miserable world, borne down with sin, and exposed each moment to death - how should we come and find the peace which he has promised to all, and take the yoke which all have found to be light!


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.

    Bibliography
    Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/matthew-11.html. 1870.

    The Biblical Illustrator

    Matthew 11:30

    For My yoke is easy and My burden is light.

    Christ’s yoke and burden

    some of the particulars in which Christ is reputed to impose a heavy yoke and burden. I know of no obligation chat rests upon me as a Christian which does not equally rest upon me as a man.

    1. The burden of duty. Purity, justice, love, industry, are enjoined upon me as a man. This burden Christ makes light and easy.

    2. The yoke of penitence, the burden of self-reproach. This burden we bring with us into the school of Christ; nor can we get rid of it by remaining from Christ. It has rested far more heavily under Pagan than Christian auspices. But through Christ penitence is the way to peace. Its tears are the dew-drops of the soul’s resurrection morning. Forgiveness is its counterpart.

    3. The burden of selfdenial. This not merely a Christian duty, but a universal necessity. Through Christ it is made such as we can carry with joy and gratitude.

    4. The unavoidable burden of earthly suffering least of all to be ascribed to Christ. (A. P. Peabody, D. D.)

    Christ’s yoke easy

    Important that those to whom the ministry of the gospel is entrusted should state with clearness the real nature of religion, neither too easy or too difficult.

    I. Christians are under the yoke. Not their own masters; please not themselves. What is the yoke? Obedience to His commandments.

    II. It is an easy yoke.

    1. In comparison with the yoke of Satan.

    2. In comparison with the yoke which self-righteousness imposes on mankind.

    3. As it is made easy in itself to those who wear it, Christ renders obedience pleasant to His followers. (E. Cooper.)

    Christ s burden a light burden

    I. In what it consists.

    1. In the daily conflict which the Christian maintains with the sin that dwelleth in him.

    2. In the hostile treatment which the Christian experiences from the world.

    3. In the chastening which the Christian receives from his heavenly Master.

    II. It is light.

    1. It is light compared with the burden of the unpardoned sin in another world.

    2. It is light compared with the burden of unpardoned sin in this world.

    3. It is made light in itself to those who bear it; strength is given to bear it. (E. Cooper.)

    Hard to nature, easy to grace

    Is Christ’s yoke not easy then? Is there not force and meaning in His own words? Yes, most assuredly; but it is easy only to them who, having heard His voice, have come unto Him at His call, and who have thus received the will, the grace, the strength to take it upon them, and to bear it. A thing is easy to be done just in proportion to the power of doing it. It is easy for a man to lift a weight which a child could not move from the ground. It is easy for the bird to soar into the atmosphere, and for the fish to make its way through the waters; their natures are suited to their respective elements; but it were impossible for man to do either. So, in the spiritual world, what becomes easy to a believing and renewed soul is impossible to a sinner in his carnal state. What is impossible to nature, is easy to grace. (J. Macfarlane.)

    The nature and excellence of the Saviour’s discipline

    I. That christ has his yoke, his discipline, and that we are never to forget that it is so substantially and really. These are, in the first place, conditions of discipleship.

    1. One condition is the entire submission of the judgment of the disciples to the Great Teacher.

    2. If any man will be My disciple, so says our Lord, let him deny himself.

    3. Taking up the cross.

    But the discipline of Christ has its restraints as well as its conditions.

    1. Christ lays restraint upon our society.

    2. Upon the affections and tempers of the soul.

    3. Upon the words.

    4. Upon the whole conduct.

    Then there is service, too, in the discipline of Jesus Christ.

    1. Service of devotion.

    2. Charity and zeal.

    II. That his yoke is easy and that even his burden is light. Rest can be found in no other way of life. Easy

    Christ’s yoke easy to the subjects of His kingdom

    1. Because having come to Christ they have received the willing mind to bear it.

    2. Because there is a pure satisfaction imparted to their mind even in the very exercise of self-denial and self-abasement which He enjoins.

    3. Because His Presence is promised to be with His servants to make it easy and light.

    4. This yoke ever becomes easier and this burden lighter as the Christian continues to bear it.

    5. That it is easy in comparison with that which must otherwise be borne. (J. Macfarlane.)

    Religion easy

    1. Because of the means of instruction which are afforded us, to teach us how to commence it.

    2. Because of the principles on which the Christian acts; not from compulsion, but from filial affection.

    3. Because of the helps which a Christian derives while maintaining the discipline of that life.

    4. Because of the enjoyments that stand connected with the Christian’s course.

    5. Because of the prospect before him in heaven. (E. E. Jenkins.)

    Christ’s service easy

    Christ’s service is easy to a spiritual mind.

    I. It is easy, as it is a rational service: consonant to right reason, though contradictory to depraved nature.

    II. Easy, as it is a spiritual service: delightful to a spiritual mind.

    III. Easy, as it is an assisted service; considering that we work not in our own strength, but in God’s.

    IV. Easy, when once it is an accustomed service; though hard to beginners, it is easy to professors; the farther we walk the sweeter is our way.

    V. Easy, as it is the most gainful service; having the assurances of an eternal weight of glory as the reward of our obedience. (Burkitt.)

    God knows our burden

    A little boy was helping his father to unpack some boxes of dry goods. His father took the pieces of goods from the box and put them on the outstretched arms of the boy. “Don’t you think you have load enough?” said some one passing by. “Father knows best. He knows how much I ought to carry,” replied the boy. How much trust and confidence it shows us. He knew that his father, who loved him, would not give him more than he could carry. And so it is with our Heavenly Father. Sometimes we think He is putting more on us than we can carry, and we become fretful. Sometimes He adds sorrow to sorrow until we think we cannot bear the load, but He knows best, and will not give us more than we can bear, for He is a kind and loving Father.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Matthew 11:30". The Biblical Illustrator. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/matthew-11.html. 1905-1909. New York.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. Christ calls a profession of faith in him, and subjection to his ordinances, a yoke, in allusion to the law of Moses, and in distinction from it; and a "burden", with respect to the very heavy ones the Scribes and Pharisees laid upon the shoulders of the people, obliging them to a strict observance of them; though of a different nature from either of them; "for his commandments are not grievous", hard and heavy to be borne, as their's were, but "easy and light": not that they are so to unregenerate men, or are easily performed by the strength of nature, and power of men's free will: but they are good and amiable, and lovely in their own nature, and are cheerfully complied with, and abundance of spiritual pleasure and delight is enjoyed in them by believers, when they have the presence of God, the assistance of his Spirit, and the discoveries of his love. Moreover, the commands of Christ, and the ordinances of the Gospel, are so in comparison of the law of Moses; which required perfect obedience, but gave no strength to perform, and threatened with condemnation and death, in case of the least failure; and of the numerous, and some very severe rites and usages of the ceremonial law; and of the bulky and heavy traditions of the elders, and ordinances of men.


    Copyright Statement
    The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
    A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

    Bibliography
    Gill, John. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/matthew-11.html. 1999.

    Geneva Study Bible

    For my yoke [is] k easy, and my burden is light.

    (k) May easily be carried. For his commandments are not grievous, for all who are born of God overcome the world; (1 John 5:4).

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/matthew-11.html. 1599-1645.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

    For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light — Matchless paradox, even among the paradoxically couched maxims in which our Lord delights! That rest which the soul experiences when once safe under Christ‘s wing makes all yokes easy, all burdens light.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
    This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/matthew-11.html. 1871-8.

    People's New Testament

    For my yoke is easy. The yoke that sin imposes is heavy, and bearing it brings no rest. So, too, the yoke of false or corrupted religion is burdensome; but Christ's yoke is easy. It is not hard to bear it because it is borne in love. His burden, even if it be the cross, is light, because he helps us to bear it. Note: That one rejecting Christ in the midst of light is worse than a heathen. Christ graciously invites all to come to him. He is the rest of the soul.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
    Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

    Bibliography
    Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/matthew-11.html. 1891.

    Vincent's Word Studies

    Easy ( χρηστὸς )

    Not a satisfactory rendering. Christ's yoke is not easy in the ordinary sense of that word. The word means originally, good, serviceable. The kindred noun, χρηστότης , occurring only in Paul's writings, is rendered kindness in 2 Corinthians 6:6; Titus 3:4; Galatians 5:22; Ephesians 2:7 (Rev.), and goodness, Romans 2:4 (Rev.). At Luke 5:39, it is used of old wine, where the true reading, instead of better, is good ( χρηστός )mellowed with age. Plato (“Republic,” 424) applies the word to education. “Good nurture and education ( τροφὴ γὰρ καὶ παίδευσις χρηστὴ ) implant good ( ἀγαθὰς ) constitutions; and these good ( χρησταὶ ) constitutions improve more and more;” thus evidently using χρηστός and ἀγαθός as synonymous. The three meanings combine in the word, though it is impossible to find an English word which combines them all. Christ's yoke is wholesome, serviceable, kindly. “Christ's yoke is like feathers to a bird; not loads, but helps to motion” (Jeremy Taylor).


    Copyright Statement
    The text of this work is public domain.

    Bibliography
    Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/matthew-11.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

    Wesley's Explanatory Notes

    For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

    For my yoke is easy — Or rather gracious, sweet, benign, delightful: and my burden - Contrary to those of men, is ease, liberty, and honour.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

    Bibliography
    Wesley, John. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/matthew-11.html. 1765.

    James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

    THE YOKE OF CHRIST

    For My yoke is easy, and My burden is light.’

    Matthew 11:30

    It is beautifully instructive how, in this incomparably winning invitation of Jesus, the call to rest, and the call to labour, are blended. The rest of faith, and the labour of love!

    I. The easy yoke.—The ‘yoke’ of a Christian is not always necessarily ‘easy.’ Then how are we to reconcile the contradiction? Beyond a doubt, the explanation is to be found not in the character of the ‘yoke,’ but in the state and condition of the man who bears it. The secret lies not in the thing, but in the person.

    The result is an act of Divine power. I shall scarcely exaggerate if I call it ‘a miracle.’ It is the fitting of the man to his position. The ‘yoke’ is hard till the love with it takes away the hardness. He who put it on walks at his side. And the yoke-bearer hears his Master’s voice, hears Him all the way.

    II. The light burden.—Let us look at the great reason why God’s ‘burden is light.’ The ‘burden’ of sin is taken out of it! That heavy, oppressive, crushing ‘burden’ of unforgiven sin,—that is gone, quite gone. And when that ‘burden’ is taken off, whatever is left does not deserve the name. It would not be too much to say that the ‘burden’ of every ‘burden’ is the ‘burden’ of the sin that is in it! How can that ‘burden’ be heavy, which we bear with Christ? Do you think He will not take the largest share? Will He not take all your ‘labour’? Is not He the Burden-bearer, and the Care-bearer, no less than the Sin-bearer of all His people? Do not monopolise your sorrows. Do not drag your cross. Do not flinch from duty. Do not forget Who is carrying it with you, in you, and for you.

    —The Rev. James Vaughan.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/matthew-11.html. 1876.

    Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

    REFLECTIONS

    Will any send my soul to question, whether Jesus be indeed He that should come: or can there be a possibility of cause to look for another? Oh! no. He is the altogether lovely: and the chiefest and the fairest among ten thousand. Now, even now, as well as in the days of his flesh, the spiritually blind, are receiving from him their sight: the lame in soul, Jesus makes to leap as an hart; leprous sin-hers are cleansed in the fountain of his blood; the deaf hear the words of the book; the dead in trespasses and sins are raised; and the poor in spirit, hear and know the joyful sound, and through grace walk in the light of God's countenance. And can there be another Jesus: another Gospel which we have not received? Oh! thou dear Lord! blessed forever blessed be thou for having said, blessed is ha whosoever shall not be offended in me!

    Lord! grant if it be thy blessed will, that it never may be the condemnation of our land like Chorazin and Bethsaida! Great Gospel privileges we have indeed; but what must follow if we neglect, or reject such great salvation?

    Reader! let you and I listen to the sweet and gracious invitation, which Jesus gives to the weary in sin, and to the heavy laden under the burthen of it, Oh! for grace to learn of thee, thou meek and lovely Savior! Thou art indeed, both a rest and resting place, for thy people. In thee, my soul would rest from sin, and rest to God. Thou art both a shelter from the wind, and a covert from the tempest. Thou art my hiding place, thou will preserve me from trouble. Thou wilt compass mc about with songs of deliverance. Haste, haste my soul, to thy rest, thy Jesus for the Lord hath dealt bountifully by thee!


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/matthew-11.html. 1828.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

    Ver. 30. For my yoke is easy] {a} After a man is once used to it a little: he cannot fudge so well with it perhaps at first, because an untamed heifer: but after a while, his commandments will be nothing grievous, "I delight to do thy will, O God," saith David.

    And my burden light] Such as you may as easily bear away as Samson did the gates of Gaza; such as you may well run under, as a horse doth without a load, or a hind upon the mountains. It is no more burden than the wings are to the bird, wherewith it flies aloft where it listeth.

    {a} χρηστος, useful, opposed to πονηρος, painful, tedious.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Trapp, John. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/matthew-11.html. 1865-1868.

    Sermon Bible Commentary

    Matthew 11:30

    This passage has in it some far-reaching things, which do not strike us on a mere cursory reading. (1) It sets before us very clearly the Saviour's constant attitude of invitation. (2) It reminds us that we become learners in Christ's school only through the process of obedience. (3) It teaches us that there are degrees of rest in the experience of the Christian disciple. Consider especially the words of the text. Christ does not mean to allege that the cross which we are to take up is not a real cross, or that the self-renunciation to which He calls us is but a nominal thing. Still less does He design to show the superiority of His religion to the systems of heathenism which so enslaved their votaries. His words are absolute, and not comparative; and therefore, admitting to the full all the tribulations and unpleasantnesses, all the sacrifices and afflictions, which his very adherence to Jesus entails upon every Christian disciple, let us see if we can discover anything which may justify the assertion that His yoke is easy, and His burden light.

    I. The yoke of Christ is easy, and His burden light, because we bear it with the approbation of conscience. The yoke which is borne by a good conscience is always light; the burden which does not consist of sin is never heavy.

    II. This yoke is easy because it is borne in love. Love lightens labour, lessens adversity, sweetens care, and is unconscious of a yoke which otherwise would be heavy. When we are murmuring within ourselves at the cost of our Christianity, it is because we have not yet realized the value of Christ.

    III. Christ's yoke is easy, and His burden light, because it is borne with the help of the Spirit of God.

    IV. Christ's words are true because His burden becomes lighter the longer it is borne. That which required effort at first is at length done with ease and enjoyment. Nobody will believe that until he has experienced it. But every Christian knows that it is true.

    V. Christ's yoke is easy, and His burden light, because we are sustained under it by a good hope. Heaven and endless happiness are before us, and the assurance that they are reserved for us, while we are kept for them, steadies us beneath a weight which else might bear us down.

    W. M. Taylor, Christian at Work, March 20th, 1879.

    References: Matthew 11:30.—A. P. Peabody, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xii., p. 142; Three Hundred Outlines on the New Testament, p. 19. Matt 11—H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xix., p. 294.




    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/matthew-11.html.

    Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

    Observe here, 1. Christ's authority and greatness; he has power to impose a yoke, and inflict a burden. My yoke; my burden.

    2. His clemency and goodness, is imposing an easy yoke, and a light burden. My yoke is easy, my burden is light: that is, my service is good and gainful, profitable and useful; not only tolerable but delightful; and as is my yoke such is my burden: The burden of my cross, both light, not absolutely, but comparatively; the weight of my cross is not comparable with the glory of my crown.

    Learn, That the service of Christ, though hard and intolerable to corrupt nature, yet is a most desirable and delightful service to grace, or renewed nature; Christ's service is easy to a spiritual mind.

    1. It is easy, as it is a rational service; consonant to right reason, though contradictory to depraved nature.

    2. Easy as it is a spiritual service; delightful to a spiritual mind.

    3. Easy, as it is an assisted service; considering that we work not in our own strength, but in God's.

    4. Easy, when once it is an accustomed service; though hard to beginners, it is easy to progressors; the further we walk, the sweeter is our way.

    5. Easy, as it is the most gainful service; having the assurance of an eternal weight of glory, as the reward of our obedience.

    Well therefore might our holy Lord say to his followers; My yoke is easy, and my burden is light.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/matthew-11.html. 1700-1703.

    Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

    30.] χρηστός, easy, ‘not exacting;’ answering to ‘kind,’ spoken of persons, Luke 6:35. See 1 John 5:3. Owing to the conflict with evil ever incident to our corrupt nature even under grace, the ἀνάπαυσις which Christ gives is yet to be viewed as a yoke and a burden, seen on this its painful side, of conflict and sorrow: but it is a light yoke; the inner rest in the soul giving a peace which passeth understanding, and bearing it up against all. See 2 Corinthians 4:16.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/matthew-11.html. 1863-1878.

    Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

    Matthew 11:30. ζυγός ΄ου, My yoke) In one point of view, Scripture speaks of the cross, in another of the yoke of the godly, see ch. Matthew 10:38.— χρηστὸς, easy) for I am meek.— ἐλαφρὸν, light) for I am lowly.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/matthew-11.html. 1897.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    Ver. 28-30. Our Lord having before showed;

    1. That all power was given to him;

    2. That none could know the Father but by and in him; closes his discourse with an invitation of persons to him. By the weary and heavy laden, in the text, some understand those that are laden with the sense of their sins, and the feeling the guilt of them. Others understand, with the burden of the law, which the apostles called a yoke, Acts 15:10.

    Mr. Calvin thinks this too strait an interpretation. Others understand heavy laden with trials and afflictions. Christ will give rest to all those of his people that are any ways weary and heavy laden, but in an order first to souls wearied and heavy laden with the burden of their sins, and their want of a righteousness wherein to stand before God. Then to such to whom he hath given this rest, he promises also rest from their troubles and persecutions in the world, John 16:33. It is very like he used this term, Come, with respect to that of Isaiah, Isaiah 55:1,2. That by coming is to be understood believing is plain from John 6:44-46 Hebrews 11:6. The rest promised chiefly respecteth the soul, as appears from Matthew 11:29. The promise may be understood both of that rest which believers have in this life, Romans 5:2 15:13, and also of that rest which after this life remaineth to the people of God, Hebrews 4:9. Whatever the rest be, it must be of Christ’s giving and our seeking; nor is it to be obtained without labour and suffering, for it followeth,

    Take my yoke upon you. The members of Christ are not without a yoke, a law and rule by which they are obliged to walk; and though the service of God be a perfect freedom, yet to flesh and blood it is a yoke, grating upon our sensitive appetite, and restraining our natural motions and inclinations.

    For I am meek and lowly. Humility and meekness are in themselves yokes, as they are contrary to our pride, and aptness to swell in a high opinion of ourselves; and to our wrath and danger, which sometimes boils to a great height, without any due fuel: and as in themselves they are a great part of Christ’s yoke, so they fit and dispose us to take Christ’s further yoke upon us, and may be here considered as means directed for the better performance of the precept,

    Take my yoke upon you. Our Lord also by this precept lets us know there can be no true faith without obedience to the commands of Christ. Though true faith and obedience be two things, yet they are inseparable; Show me thy faith (saith James) by thy works; and the rest of the text is not promised to either of them severally, but to both jointly.

    For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. Our Saviour had before {Matthew 7:13,14} told us that the way to heaven is a strait way, how doth he now tell us his yoke is easy and his burden light?

    Answer:

    1. Nothing makes it hard or burdensome but our corruption, which floweth from the depravation of human nature.

    2. It is much easier than the yoke and burden of the law.

    3. Though it be hard to beginners, yet it is easy when we have once accustomed ourselves to it.

    4. It is easy, considering that we do it not in our own strength, but by assistance from God, Jeremiah 31:33 Ezekiel 36:25,26 Joh 15:3, we are delivered even from the moral law, considered as a covenant, and as merely commanding us, and affording no help and assistance.

    5. It is also easy; as we are by the love of God constrained to our duty, so we are freed from the rigour of the law. It is easy and light, as it is a course of life highly consonant to our reason, once delivered from a bondage to our passions. Finally, it is much more easy and light than the service of our lusts is. There is no greater slavery than a subjection to our lusts, that if a drunkard saith "Come," we must come, if an harlot saith "Go," we must go. Or than our service to the world, &c. To say nothing of the exceeding easiness of it, from the prospect of the great reward proposed and promised to those who keep the commandments of Christ, the exceeding and eternal weight of glory, 2 Corinthians 4:17; as Jacob’s hard service of fourteen years seemed to him but a few days.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/matthew-11.html. 1685.

    Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

    30. τὸ φορτίον μου ἐλαφρόν ἐστιν. Contrast with this the burden of the Pharisees, ch. Matthew 23:4, φορτία βαρέα [καὶ δυσβάστακτα].


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/matthew-11.html. 1896.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    30. Yoke… burden — Men serve the world, and in that service they are like the sturdy ox; a yoke is on their neck, and a burden on their back. And this is true, as shown above, (note on Matthew 11:28,) of all classes, from lowest to highest. Yoke is easy — The yoke of Christ is freedom. The service of God is the highest and truest liberty. The laws of God are the laws of our highest nature; and he who comes under those laws does but do what is fittest, rightest, most happy, and most highly natural for him. When Christ gives his law, he gives a heart and a pleasure to keep that law, so that he who obeys it does as he pleases.

    And now this chapter, from the second verse, must be read in one connection as a single historical piece. John sends his query to our Saviour in regard to his kingly Messiahship. Jesus answers John by deeds more than words. Then does he first draw that mingled portraiture of John, which exhibits the greatness of John as the testifier, but his littleness as the questioner. Starting from John, the Lord then upbraids that childish generation who caviled at both him and John; he peals forth a strain of woes upon the impenitent cities who rejected him; soars into a lofty thanksgiving to his Father, who had yet revealed to the docile babe his kingdom; nay, he rises to the very height of his mysterious oneness with the Father; and from that height he finally descends to call the sons of men to accept his service as divine emancipator of their souls from bondage.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/matthew-11.html. 1874-1909.

    Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

    “For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”

    The word translated ‘easy’ means ‘good, kind’. The point is that the yoke fits well and makes life easy so as to enable the task to be done quicker and better. It is not a recipe for idleness. As a carpenter Jesus had known what it meant to make a yoke fit the particular team that it was intended for so as to make life for the oxen as easy as possible. And that is what He is saying here, the yoke that He gives us will be designed just for us, and will fit comfortably. Of course it will require being meek and lowly in heart, it will mean walking alongside Him without chafing, it will involve putting in full effort, but it will make whatever burden we have to bear a light one. We will declare, ‘this is no burden. This is what Jesus wants me to help Him to carry’.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/matthew-11.html. 2013.

    Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

    Matthew 11:30. For my yoke is easy (wholesome) and my burden is light. The ‘yoke’ answers to those ‘laboring;’ the ‘burden’ to those ‘heavy laden.’ Christ does not promise freedom from labor and burdens, but promises that we shall be so changed as to find them ‘wholesome’ and light. Christ indeed demands a righteousness exceeding that of the Scribes and Pharisees, and teaches us that there is a depth of meaning in the law, which our consciences did not perceive; yet. He says that His yoke, His requirements, are wholesome, and His burden, oftentimes a cross, is light! One who goes to Christ to find rest for his soul, obtains from Him peace of conscience and power to obey. We go to Him as a teacher meek and lowly in heart; the first lesson learned is, to humbly and penitently take from Him what we need. What He has done for us secures pardon, what He does in us gives power. The Teacher of the highest morality could only fulfil these promises by becoming an actual Saviour from sin; that He can and will save is the ground tone of the whole passage. Saved by Him, indeed, as Augustine says, the yoke is like the plumage of the bird,—an easy weight enabling it to soar heavenward.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/matthew-11.html. 1879-90.

    The Expositor's Greek Testament

    Matthew 11:30. χρηστός, kindly to wear. Christ’s doctrine fits and satisfies our whole spiritual nature—reason, heart, conscience, “the sweet reasonableness of Christ”.— φορτίον, the burden of obligation.— ἐλαφρόν: in one respect Christ’s burden is the heaviest of all because His moral ideal is the highest. But just on that account it is light. Lofty, noble ideals inspire and attract; vulgar ideals are oppressive. Christ’s commandment is difficult, but not like that of the Rabbis, grievous. (vide With Open Face.)


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/matthew-11.html. 1897-1910.

    George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

    For my yoke is sweet, &c. For though, in regard of our weak nature, it be a very heavy yoke, yet the grace of God renders it easy and light, because our Lord himself helps us to bear it, according to that of the prophet Osee, (Chap. xi, ver. 4) I will be unto them as he that takes the yoke from off their head. St. Bernard says, that our Saviour sweetens by the spiritual unction of his grace, all the crosses, penances, and mortifications of religious souls. St. Augustine owns that before he knew the power of grace, he could never comprehend what charity was, nor believe that any one was able to practice it; but the grace of God renders all things easy. (Rodriguez, On Mortification. Chap. xix.)


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/matthew-11.html. 1859.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

    For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. Matchless paradox, even among the paradoxically couched maxims in which our Lord delights! That rest which the soul experiences when once safe under Christ's wing, makes all yokes easy, all burdens light.

    Remarks:

    (1) Perhaps in no section of this wonderful History is the veil so fully lifted from the Redeemer's soul, and His inmost thoughts and deepest emotions more affectingly disclosed, than here. When we think how much more profound and acute must have been His sensibilities than say other's-from the unsullied purity of His nature and the vast reach of His perceptions-we may understand, in some degree, what "a Man of sorrows" He must have been, and how "acquainted with grief" - to see His Person slighted, His errand misapprehended, and His message rejected, in the very region on which He bestowed the most of His presence and the richest of His labours. Even in ancient prophecy we find Him exclaiming, "I have laboured in vain, I have spent My strength for nought and in vain;" and falling back upon this affecting consolation, that there was One that knew Him, and was the Judge of His doings: "Yet surely my judgment is with the Lord, and my work with my God" (Isaiah 49:4). But, as we turn to the bright side of the picture, who can fathom the depth of that exultant complacency with which His eye rested upon those "babes" into whose souls streamed the light of God's salvation, and with which He set His seal to that law of the divine procedure in virtue of which this was done, while from the self-sufficient it was hidden! And after thus seeming to wrap Himself and His Father up from all human penetration, except of some favoured class, what ineffable joy must it have been to His heart to disabuse the anxious of such a thought, by giving forth that most wonderful of all invitations, "Come unto Me!" etc. These are some of the lights and shadows of the Redeemer's life on earth; and what a reality do they impart to the Evangelical Narrative-what resistless attraction, what heavenly sanctity!

    (2) Let those who, under the richest ministrations of the word of life, "repent not," but live on unrenewed in the spirit of their minds, remember the doom of the cities of Galilee-executed in part, but in its most dread elements yet to come-and rest assured that at the judgment-day the degree of guilt will be estimated, not by the flagrancy of outward transgression, but by the degree of violence habitually offered to the voice of conscience-the extent to which light is quenched and conviction stifled. (See the notes at Luke 12:47-48.) Ah! blighted Chorazin, Bethsaida, Capernaum-who, and more particularly what pastor, can wander over that region somewhere in which ye once basked in the very sunshine of Heaven's light, as no other spots on earth ever did, and not enter thrillingly into the poet's soliloquy --

    "These days are past-Bethsaida, where? Chorazin, where art thou? His tent the wild Arab pitches there,

    The wild reed shades thy brow.

    "Tell me, ye mouldering fragments, tell, Was the Saviour's city here? Lifted to heaven, has it sunk to hell,

    With none to shed a tear?

    "Ah! would my flock from thee might learn How days of grace will flee; How all an offered Christ who spurn Shall mourn at last like thee." (-McCHEYNE.)

    (3) If it be true that "no man knoweth the Son but the Father," how unreasonable is it to measure the statements of Scripture regarding the Person and work of Christ by the limited standard of human apprehension-rejecting, modifying, or explaining away whatever we are unable fully to comprehend, even though clearly expressed in the oracles of God! Nay, in the light of what our Lord here says of it, are not the difficulties just what might have been expected?

    (4) Let those who set the sovereignty of divine grace in opposition to the freedom and responsibility of the human will-rejecting now the one and now the other, as if they were irreconcileable-take the rebuke which our Lord here gives them. For while nowhere is there a more explicit declaration than here of the one doctrine-That the saving knowledge of the Father depends absolutely on the sovereign "will" of the Son to impart it; yet nowhere is there a brighter utterance of the other also-That this knowledge, and the rest it brings, is open to all who will come to Christ for it, and that all who sigh for rest unto their souls are freely invited, and will be cordially welcomed, under Christ's wing.

    (5) But Whose voice do I hear in this incomparable Invitation? Moses was the divinely commissioned lawgiver of Israel, but I do not find him speaking so; nor did the chiefest of the apostles presume to speak so. But that is saying little. For no human lips ever ventured to come within any measurable approach to such language. We could fancy one saying-We might say it and have said it ourselves-`Come, and I will show you where rest is to be found.' But here the words are, "COME UNTO ME, AND I WILL GIVE YOU REST." To give repose even to one weary, burdened soul-much more to all of every age and every land-what mortal ever undertook this? what creature is able to do it? But here is One who undertakes it, and is conscious that He has power to do it. It is the voice of my Beloved. It is not the syren voice of the Tempter, coming to steal away our hearts from the living God-it would be that, if the spokesman were a creature-but it is the Only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth; and in calling so lovingly, "Come hither to ME," He is but wooing us back to that blessed Bosom of the Father, that original and proper home of the heart, from which it is our misery that we were ever estranged.

    (6) As the source of all unrest is estrangement from God, so the secret of true and abiding repose is that of the prodigal, who, when at length he came to say, "I will arise and go to my Father," straightway "arose and went." But as Jesus is the way, and the truth, and the life of this return, so in subjection to Jesus-as Himself was in absolute subjection to His Father-is the heart's true rest. When "the love of Christ constrains us to live not unto ourselves, but unto Him who died for us, and rose again;" when we enter into His meekness and lowliness of heart who "made Himself of no reputation," and "pleased not Himself" in anything, but His Father in everything-then, and only then, shall we find rest unto our souls. Whereas those who chafe with restless discontent and ambition and self-seeking are "like the troubled sea when it cannot rest, whose waters cast up mire and dirt."

    (7) Although the Fathers of the Church were not wrong in calling the Fourth Gospel, 'the spiritual Gospel [ to (Greek #3588) pneumatikon (Greek #4152)], in contradistinction to the First Three Gospels, which they called 'the corporeal' ones [ ta (Greek #3588) soomatika (Greek #4984)] - striving thus to express the immensely higher platform of vision to which the Fourth Gospels lifts us-yet is it the same glorious Object who is held in all the Four; and while the Fourth Gospel enshrines some of its most divine and spiritual teachings in a framework of exquisitely concrete historical fact, the First Three Gospels rise at times-as Matthew here, and Luke in the corresponding passage (Luke 10:21-22) - into a region of pure Johanine thought; insomuch that on reading the last six verses of this section, we seem to be reading out of the 'spiritual' Gospel. In fact, it is all corporeal and all spiritual; only, the one side was committed peculiarly to the First Three Evangelists, "by the same Spirit;" the other, to the Fourth Evangelist, "by the same Spirit" - "but all these worketh that one and the self-same Spirit, dividing to every man severally as He will."


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/matthew-11.html. 1871-8.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (30) Easy.—The Greek has a wider range of meaning—good, helpful, kind, profitable.

    My burden is light.—The “burden” of Christ was the commandment that most characterised His teaching—the new commandment that men should love one another; and those who obeyed that commandment would find all to which it bound them light and easy.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/matthew-11.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.
    my yoke
    Proverbs 3:17; Micah 6:8; Acts 15:10,28; Galatians 5:1,18; 1 John 5:3
    burden
    John 16:33; 2 Corinthians 1:4,5; 4:17; 12:9,10; Philippians 4:13

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/matthew-11.html.

    The Bible Study New Testament

    The yoke I will give you is easy. His yoke is very easy and light, compared to the penalty which sin imposes. The load which Christ gives us is carried in love—and he helps us to carry it. (See Romans 8:26-28; 1 Corinthians 10:13.) EVERYONE MAY COME!!!


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.

    Bibliography
    Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/matthew-11.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

    E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

    Easy is from a word that means it is not harsh nor galling because it is made correctly. If a yoke for a beast is made to fit his body, he can pull a heavy load without any injury to his shoulders, and that would make a big burden comparatively light. On that principle the service that Christ places upon the shoulders of his disciples is adapted to their needs and abilities, which makes it easy to bear.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Matthew 11:30". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/matthew-11.html. 1952.

    Lectionary Calendar
    Wednesday, June 3rd, 2020
    the Week of Proper 4 / Ordinary 9
    ADVERTISEMENT
    ADVERTISEMENT
    ADVERTISEMENT
    To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
    Powered by Lightspeed Technology