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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Matthew 2:10

When they saw the star, they rejoiced exceedingly with great joy.


John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

When they saw the star,.... Which by its appearance, size, brightness, &c. they knew to be the same with that which they had seen, when in their own country;

they rejoiced with exceeding great joy; a "pleonasm" or a redundancy of expression frequently used by the Hebrews, see John 4:6 and the Septuagint there; setting forth the rapture, the excess of joy they were in upon the sight of the star. Very probably before this, their hearts were sad, their countenances dejected, and they greatly discouraged, having taken so great a journey, and as yet to so little purpose. They had been at Jerusalem, where they expected to have found him that was born king of the Jews; they had been at court, and conversed with men of the greatest figure and intelligence, and could get no tidings of him; people of all ranks and degrees seemed to be troubled at the account they brought; no body cared to go along with them to Bethlehem: all these circumstances no doubt were discouraging to them; but as soon as they saw the star their spirits revived, joy filled their hearts, cheerfulness appeared in their countenances; and they pursued their journey with inexpressible delight, till they came to the place where the illustrious person was they were seeking after.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/matthew-2.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy — The language is very strong, expressing exuberant transport.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/matthew-2.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

And when they saw the star. This language shows that for a time, at least, they had not seen the star until they left Jerusalem for Bethlehem. Its reappearance caused them great rejoicing, because it showed them that their quest was not in vain.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/matthew-2.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

They rejoiced with exceeding great joy (εχαρησαν χαραν μεγαλην σποδραecharēsan charan megalēn sphodra). Second aorist passive indicative with cognate accusative. Their joy was due to the success of the search.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/matthew-2.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.

Seeing the star — Standing over where the child was.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/matthew-2.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And when they saw the star, they rejoiced1 with exceeding great joy2.

  1. And when they saw the star, they rejoiced. A comfort restored is a comfort multiplied.

  2. With exceeding great joy. The return of the star assured them that God would lead them safely and surely to the object of their desires. Their joy was such as comes to those who come from seasons of dark doubt to the glories of light and faith. The star enabled them to find Jesus without asking questions, and bringing such public attention to him as would aid Herod in preventing his escape. Since the magi were guided by a star, they were forced to enter Bethlehem by night, and this contributed to the privacy of their coming and the safety of Jesus.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/matthew-2.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

STARS AS TYPES

‘When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.’

Matthew 2:10

A great many theories have been advanced to account for the appearance of the star, but what God tells us in the Bible is all that we need to know.

I. The leading of the star.—The star led the Wise Men to Jesus Christ, and so, too, may we be led to Him in some such way. Astronomy is a very fascinating study in itself, and it can hardly fail to make us realise something of the vastness of God. The distances from our earth to some of these stars are known to be inconceivably great. The light from the nearest star outside the system of our own sun and the planets is known to take some four years to reach our earth, and light can travel a distance of eight times round the world in a second. Surely facts like these may do something to lead us to know God’s infinite greatness and our own insignificance.

II. Stars as types.—The star was the sign that led the Wise Men to seek Jesus, and we may think too of the stars as types of some of those lights, as it were, in the darkness that may guide us if we will to His feet.

(a) Christian friendship shining like a beacon light in the darkness is often the star that has led to Christ. The Wise Men on their journey were a comfort one to another. Each one wanted to find Christ, each one had gifts to offer to Him, and so they cheered each other on their way.

(b) The quiet influence of some friends may have been very precious to us. A quiet, steady, gentle light shone from them as if from a star that told of powers hidden away that were the strength and force of their character. Their lives were to us an open Bible that told us of God’s laws. They were those whom we really loved and trusted. Let us take care that our own star is shining, that our lamps are alight to show others the way.

(c) The circumstances of life may be stars that lead us to the Lord Jesus Christ. The Wise Men left country, home, all that was dear to them. There were dangers and hardships on the road for them to bear, but when they found the child cradled in a manger stall, and had faith enough to see God’s plans through it all, they worshipped Christ and offered Him their gifts. Others besides the Wise Men have been led by hardship and disappointment to find joy and peace in Christ. Welcome whatever God may see fit to send. Let us look, then, for the stars that lead to Christ, and follow whither they lead. We give the incense of prayer, the gold of loyal obedience, and the myrrh of thanksgiving. There is still in Christ a welcome for all who turn to Him.

Illustration

‘It has been calculated that a “conjunction” (i.e. an apparent near approach) of Saturn and Jupiter occurred in b.c. 6, and some have thought to account in this way for the “star” seen by the Magi. But no planet could have “gone before them,” to the very spot; and if the narrative is to be taken literally, the meteor must have been sent miraculously. Alford makes out a strong case in favour of the natural “conjunction” being referred to, but Pritchard (in Smith’s Dictionary of the Bible) seems clearly to disprove it. The Magi may have connected the appearance of the star at that particular time with the birth of the Messiah, through knowing Daniel’s prophecy, uttered in Chaldea, Daniel 9:24-26, or from a tradition of Balaam’s words (himself from the East), Numbers 24:17; or (through the Jews resident in Persia and Babylonia) from the Messianic predictions generally. Some curious prophecies in the sacred books of Persia, the “Zend-Avesta,” are also mentioned by Bp. Ellicott (Huls. Lect., pp. 72, 77, notes). But a special revelation was probably given them, as afterwards (Matthew 2:12). We are not to suppose that the star shone all the time. When they saw it, they went to Jerusalem as the natural place to find the “King of the Jews.” Then, on their starting for Bethlehem, the star re-appeared.’

(SECOND OUTLINE)

GOD’S DEALINGS WITH MEN

Whoever these wise men known as the Magi were, they certainly were ‘afar off,’—a long way from Christ—when the first impulse to go to Him awoke in their hearts. They were found and drawn in the line of their own special vocation. These Magi were doubtless astronomers, and it was therefore very fitting,—and very like God’s method,—that they were led by ‘a star.’ From which fact take two lessons: Be in your proper duty, and you could not be more advantageously placed for all good and holy things. Do not change old things for new, as put new affections into old works: and then expect the blessing.

I. What is ‘the star’?—It is not, of course, Christ, though sometimes Christ is called ‘The Bright and Morning Star.’ But it must shadow out something which leads us to Christ, as that ‘star’ conducted the Magi to Bethlehem. What is it?

(a) An aspiration, a fine aspiration of the soul, is always a ‘star.’ Who has not felt it? Never trifle with an aspiration!

(b) A conviction,—a strong conviction in the mind,—is ‘a star.’ It may be a conviction of sin: it may be a conviction of some new truth: it may be a conviction of the need and value of Christ. Those convictions are direct emanations from God.

(c) A scriptural thought is a ‘star’ in the soul. It may come in a book; it may come in a sermon; it may come from a friend’s lips; it may come in no apparent channel at all. Receive it. Use it. And it will flood into greater and greater light. It will make and mark a path,—a path to heaven!

(d) A pious thought that darts into the mind may bring a gleam of light. Go with it: go with it all the way; and it will land you in glory!

II. The final resting-place of ‘the star’ was the Lord Jesus Christ,—the centre of light,—the fountain of truth,—the heart’s home,—the goal of life,—the cradle of our eternity. Do not let any seeker in the school of knowledge,—do not let any real enquirer,—do not let any traveller truth-wards,—think that his journey is done, and his quest finished, till he has found the answer to the question of his mind,—the solution of the problem of life,—the quiet refuge from himself, from his sins, and his sorrows, and the world,—in Jesus only!

—The Rev. James Vaughan.

Illustration

‘When Leonardo da Vinci had finished his celebrated picture of the Last Supper, he introduced a friend to inspect the work privately, and give his judgment regarding it. “Exquisite!” exclaimed his friend; “that wine-cup seems to stand out from the table as solid glittering. silver.” Thereupon the artist quietly took a brush and blotted out the cup, saying: “I meant that the Figure of Christ should first and mainly attract the observer’s eye, and whatever diverts attention from Him must be blotted out.”’


Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/matthew-2.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

10 When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.

Ver. 10. When they saw the star] The sight whereof they seem to have lost when they turned out of the way; it led them to Jerusalem. But this text is excellently paraphrased and applied by Bishop Hooper, martyr, in a letter of his, written to one Mrs Anne Warcup, in these words (Acts and Mon.): "Such as travelled to find Christ followed only the star, and as long as they saw it, they were assured they were in the right way, and had great mirth in their journey. But when they entered into Jerusalem (whereas the star led them not thither, but unto Bethlehem) and there asked the citizens the thing that the star showed before; as long as they tarried in Jerusalem, and would be instructed where Christ was born, they were not only ignorant of Bethlehem, but also lost the sight of the star that led them before. Whereof we learn in any case, while we are going to seek Christ which is above, to beware we lose not the star of God’s word, that only is the mark that shows us where Christ is, and which way we may come unto him. But as Jerusalem stood in the way, and was an impediment to these wise men; so doth the synagogue of Antichrist (that bears the name of Jerusalem, that is, the vision of peace, and among the people now is called the Catholic Church) stand in the way that pilgrims must go by through this world to Bethlehem, the house of saturity and plentifulness, and is an impediment to all Christian travellers; yea, and except the more grace of God be, will keep the pilgrims still in her, that they shall not come where Christ is adored. And to stay them indeed, they take away the star of light, viz. the word of God, that it cannot be seen, as you may read that other star was hidden from the wise men while they asked of the Pharisees at Jerusalem where Christ was born. You may see what great dangers happened to these wise men while they were a learning of liars, where was Christ; first they were out of their way, and next they lost their guide," &c.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/matthew-2.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Matthew 2:10. When they saw the star Dr. Doddridge reads a star or meteor; because, says he, no star could point out not only a town, but a particular house. The original, in the conclusion of this verse, is remarkably emphatical, They rejoiced with a joy which was exceeding great.

Matthew 2:11. And fell down and worshipped him Prostrating themselves they adored him. Heylin. The original word for treasures signifies not only a collection of rarities and precious things, but also whatever serves to hold them. Here it signifies the vessels or boxes wherein these sages had put the presents they designed for the King of the Jews. It was the custom of their country to offer presents to the illustrious personages whom they came to visit, as appears from many passages of the Old Testament; (see Genesis 11:25. 1 Samuel 9:7-8; 1 Samuel 10:27. Psalms 72:10 and Proverbs 18:16.) and Maundrell, Chardin, and many other writers of the best credit, assure us, that the custom is yet retained. We cannot help noting how seasonable and providential an assistance this was to furnish Joseph and Mary for so long and expensivea journey as that into Egypt; a country where they were intirely strangers, and yet were to abide there for some considerable time. Several commentators have observed a significancy and propriety in these gifts; which, whether true or not, is at least ingenious. They offered him, say they, gold as a king, paying him tribute; frankincense as a god, for they honoured God with the smoke of incense; and myrrh, as a man who should die; for myrrh was used in embalming dead bodies. See Doddridge, Beausobre and Lenfant, and Henry.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/matthew-2.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1280

THE JOY OF THE MAGI

Matthew 2:10. And when they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.

IN so concise a history as that of our blessed Lord, the events of whose life and death were so numerous, that, if circumstantially related, they would occupy too many volumes to be read by the world at large, it must of necessity be found, that there is much omitted which we should have been glad to know. But the Scriptures were not written to gratify a vain curiosity: the inspired writers had a far higher object in view: they were content to record so much only as was necessary for our instruction, and to give us such brief hints as would set before our eyes one continuous and comprehensive whole. In the account of the wise men, who came from the East to worship the new-born Jesus, there is much left to mere conjecture. We know not who they were, nor whence they came, except that it was to the eastward of Jud ζa; nor how long it was after the birth of Christ; whether a few weeks, or several months. What the star was, we know not. It could not be a common star; but only a meteor, resembling one. How they came to regard it as intimating the birth of any one, and especially of one who should be the King of the Jews, we know not. It is probable that they were astronomers; and that, seeing this new star over the land of Jud ζa, they concluded it to be ominous of some great event: and, having heard of the general report, that there was expected to arise, about that time, in Jud ζa, one who should govern the whole earth, they might suppose the star to be an indication of his birth. Yet, on the whole, I think it more probable, that the same Almighty and gracious God, who sent this star to guide them to Jud ζa, revealed to them the occasion of its appearance, and the wonderful event of which they themselves were to be the favoured witnesses. The inquiry which they make on reaching Jerusalem seems indeed to place this matter beyond a doubt: for they do not ask whether some great personage were born: they express no doubt whatever respecting the fact; but only inquire where the new-born infant was; “Where is he that is born King of the Jews?; for we have seen his star, and are come to worship him.” The Jews themselves, it seems, were unconscious of any remarkable occurrence, till the confident inquiry of these strangers drew their attention to it: and then both Herod the king, and all the people at Jerusalem, were filled with consternation. Herod, a remarkably jealous prince, summoned the chiefs of the Jewish nation, that he might learn from them where their Messiah, according to the Scriptures, should be born. They, from a well-known prophecy, informed him, that Bethlehem was the highly-favoured city for which this honour was reserved: and he, on receiving this information, directed the Magi thither, with an express command, that, when they should have found him, they would come back to him, and communicate all that they should have learned respecting him. Thither the Magi now directed their steps. But no sooner had they re-commenced their journey, than the star, which they had seen in the East, and which had for some time disappeared, came again; and guided them, not to the city only, but to the house where Jesus was; thus pointing out, with infallible precision, the very child whom they desired to find. On this occasion it is said, “When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.” Now, the terms in which their joy is here spoken of are so strong, as to be incapable of being translated literally into our language. Their general import, however, is sufficiently conveyed in the words before us: “They rejoiced with exceeding great joy.”

In speaking of this their joy, we shall find it profitable to inquire, What it indicated in relation to them.

From this interesting portion of divine history we may learn,

I. The magnitude of the object which they pursued—

They sought to behold and to honour the new-born King. This was an object worthy of pursuit:

As viewed by them, it was of great moment—

[Supposing them only to conceive of him as born to a kingdom, yet, taking into consideration the miracle with which his birth was announced, and the prophetic declarations relative to the place of his birth, they might well regard him as worthy to be served and honoured. And in proportion as we suppose their views of his character and office to have been enlarged, the importance of their object must, of course, have been magnified in their minds.]

With the additional light which we enjoy, it was an object the most important that any creature could pursue—

[We know that infant to have been “Emmanuel, God with us.” Yes, he was “God manifest in human flesh:” and not a king of one nation only, but of the whole earth, even “King of kings, and Lord of lords.”

To behold him in this his humbled state; to worship him, and glorify him; what could the highest archangel desire more? This was an object worthy of ambition to every child of man: nor could any labour, any privation, any suffering, be too great to be encountered willingly, and sustained cheerfully, in the pursuit of it.]

In their labours, we behold also,

II. The ardour of mind with which it should be pursued—

Their journey, whether from Arabia or any other country, was long and arduous—

[Their setting out from their own country, and prosecuting their journey to Jud ζa, argued no little zeal: but to persevere when the star had disappeared, and when so much difficulty and uncertainty must, in all probability, attend their future exertions, required a zeal more than ordinarily intense and ardent: and we admire their steady perseverance in so great a work.]

What, then, should ever damp our ardour in the service of our Lord?

[Methinks, this is a labour in which our whole lives should be occupied. We need not, indeed, leave our homes in order to behold his face, since he is here in the midst of us: but we must be ready to part with all, if called to it: and, whatever difficulties may obstruct our way, we should determine, with God’s help, to surmount them all — — — Nor should we take with us a portion only of our property; but go and offer to him all that we are, and all that we have. Our whole selves, body, soul, and spirit, must be consecrated to his service, that he may be glorified in all — — —]

In them we may yet further see,

III. The blessedness that shall crown our labours—

“They rejoiced with exceeding great joy”—

[They, even before they had fully attained their object, rejoiced: what joy, then, must have filled their souls, when they were introduced into the very presence of this infant, and had the honour of presenting to him their gifts of gold, and frankincense and myrrh!]

But the believer’s joy at finding the Saviour, is incomparably more exalted—

[It is truly said to be a “joy unspeakable and glorified.” O how richly are the labours of a whole life repaid by one glimpse of the Saviour’s glory! And what prospects does it open to him in the eternal world! — — — Truly, no languagecan express the joy that he feels, nor any heart conceive the blessedness that awaits him — — —]

Address—

1. The nominal Christian—

[Though not truly interested in the Saviour, you are highly privileged: because you have an infinitely better guide than ever the Magi had, even the word of God, which will he a light to your feet, and a lantern to your paths; and will infallibly, if duly followed, lead you to the Saviour’s presence. Improve, then, your privileges; and let them remind you of your obligations also: for if your light be more clear than theirs, so should your surrender of yourselves to Christ be more entire.]

2. The inquiring Christian—

[You, like the Magi, may feel discouragement in your journey heavenward; and, through the withdrawment of light from your soul, be ready to doubt whether you shall ever attain the object of your desires. But hold on, in the midst of all discouragements; and doubt not but that your labour shall be crowned with success at last: for God’s promise to you is, “Then shall ye know, if ye follow on to know the Lord. His goings forth are prepared as the morning; and he shall come unto you as the rain, as the former and as the latter rain upon the earth [Note: Hosea 6:3.].”]

3. The assured Christian—

[You have found the Saviour, and presented yourselves to him. Now, then, shew yourselves worthy of this high privilege. A sad indifference exists in relation to him, even amongst those who from their office and their general information ought to be most forward in calling the attention of others to him. And, from the reports which we have of his reception in heathen lands, even amongst the most barbarous Africans and Hottentots, we may all blush for our coldness and ingratitude. However, if you have been led to the Saviour, take care to honour him in the midst of an ungodly world, and labour to make him known to all around you.]


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Bibliography
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/matthew-2.html. 1832.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Matthew 2:10. ἐχάρησαν] Euth. Zigabenus correctly says: ὡς εὑρόντες τὸν ἀψευδέστατον ὁδηγόν· ἐπληροφορήθησαν γὰρ λοιπόν, ὅτι καὶ τὸ ζητούμενον εὑρήσουσι.

σφόδρα] Adverbs at the end; comp. Matthew 4:8; Schaefer, ad Demosth. V. p. 367; Bornemann, ad Xen. Anab. ii. 6. 9; Mem. iii. 5. 17.

ἐχάρ. χαρ.] “Etenim ubi nomen per se ipsum verbi significationem neque circumscribit neque intendit, adminiculo opus est vel adjectivi vel pronominis vel articuli, quo rerum genus certum designatur,” Lobeck, Paralip. p. 507. Therefore here χαρὰν μεγάλην σφόδρα. Comp. Mark 5:42 b; Wilke, neutestam. Rhetor. p. 380. The opposite, μεγάλην λύπην λυπεῖσθαι, John 4:11; φοβεῖσθαι φόβον μέγαν, Mark 4:41.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/matthew-2.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Matthew 2:10. ἰδόντες, κ. τ. λ., when they saw) It must have been night.— τὸν ἀστέρα, the star) Both Scripture and the star show them the time and the place: Scripture, indeed, indicates the time with some latitude, in accordance with the general way in which the expectation of the Messiah’s coming then universally prevailed.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/matthew-2.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Joy is but the natural consequence of desire satisfied: they had in their own country seen an extraordinary star, which, according to the rules of their own art, they might guess to be an indication of a great Prince born, or, by a Divine revelation, they might know to be so. This kindled in them a strong desire to go and pay a homage to him; upon this they take a long journey to Jerusalem. When they come there they were more fully confirmed, from the answer of the priests and scribes, that there was a Christ to be born in Bethlehem Judah. Thither they go. In their journey the same star they had before seen appears to them again, confirming both their former apprehensions, and, by its standing over Bethlehem, and a particular house in it, (to their apprehensions), they were fully confirmed that they had right instructions from Herod, and rejoiced in the satisfaction of their desires naturally, and possibly rejoiced spiritually in this matter of joy to all people, if they had (as is probable) a spiritual illumination, and believed that this Christ was also Jesus, one come to save both Jews and Gentiles from their sins.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/matthew-2.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

10. ἐχάρησαν χαρὰν κ.τ.λ. The cognate noun becomes far more frequent in Hellenistic Greek under the influence of Hebrew expression. Observe the intensity of the joy expressed by the combination of cognate noun, adjective and adverb. To them it was a triumph at once of science and religion.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/matthew-2.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10. When they saw the star — Implying that it had before been unseen. Rejoiced with exceeding great joy — The strong terms show how great was the rapture at recovering sight of the lost star.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/matthew-2.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And when they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.’

The sight of the star filled them with great joy. It vindicated the activities of the past few months, justified their journey, and indicated that they would shortly see this great prince for themselves. No wonder then that they were filled with joy. However, it might well be that Matthew wants us to see in it the joy of the believer (Matthew 13:44; Matthew 25:21; Matthew 28:8). His Gospel thus begins with joy and ends with joy (Matthew 28:8), both at the anticipated thought of Jesus.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/matthew-2.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Matthew 2:10. When they saw the star. This shows that for some time, at least, they had not seen it.

They rejoiced with exceeding great joy. Literally, ‘rejoiced a great joy exceedingly.’ The reappearance of the star indicated to them their success and the truth of their calculations. The joy, however, was not at the standing of the star, but at its appearing again, hence miraculous guidance is not necessarily implied.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/matthew-2.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Matthew 2:10, ἰδάντες δὲχαρὰν μεγάλην σφόδρα: seeing the star standing over the sacred spot, they were overjoyed. Their quest was at an end; they had at last reached the goal of their long journey. σφόδρα, a favourite word of our evangelist, and here very appropriate after μεγάλην to express exuberant gladness, ecstatic delight. On the convoy of the star, Fritzsche remarks: “Fuit certe stellae pompa tam gravi tempore digna”. Some connect the seeing of the star in Matthew 2:10 with the beginning of the journey from Jerusalem to Bethlehem. They rejoiced, says Euthy. Zig. ὡς εὑρόντες τὸν ἀψευδέστατον ὁδηγόν.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/matthew-2.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

saw the star. Supply the Ellipsis from Matthew 2:9 (App-6) = "having seen the star [standing over where the young child was], they rejoiced", &c.

rejoiced with . . . joy. Figure of speech Polyptoton (App-6), for emphasis.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/matthew-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.

When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy , [ echareesan (Greek #5463) charan (Greek #5479) megaleen (Greek #3173) sfodra (Greek #4970)]. The language is very strong, expressing exuberant transports.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/matthew-2.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.
they rejoiced
Deuteronomy 32:13; Psalms 67:4; 105:3; Luke 2:10,20; Acts 13:46-48; Romans 15:9-13

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/matthew-2.html.

The Bible Study New Testament

When they saw the star. Implying that for a time, at least, they had not seen the star—until leaving Jerusalem for Bethlehem. Its appearance shows their search is not futile.


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/matthew-2.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Having been led from their home country by the star, the confidence of the wise men had already been pretty well established. now that it reappeared just at the time they were starting on the final lap of their journey, their confidence was made stronger and hence they had great rejoicing.


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Bibliography
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Matthew 2:10". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/matthew-2.html. 1952.

Lectionary Calendar
Tuesday, November 24th, 2020
the Week of Christ the King / Proper 29 / Ordinary 34
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