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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Matthew 6:8

"So do not be like them; for your Father knows what you need before you ask Him.


Adam Clarke Commentary

Your Father knoweth what things ye have need of - Prayer is not designed to inform God, but to give man a sight of his misery; to humble his heart, to excite his desire, to inflame his faith, to animate his hope, to raise his soul from earth to heaven, and to put him in mind that There is his Father, his country, and inheritance.

In the preceding verses we may see three faults, which our Lord commands us to avoid in prayer: -

1st. Hypocrisy. Be not as the hypocrites. Matthew 6:5.

2ndly. Dissipation. Enter into thy closet. Matthew 6:6.

3rdly. Much Speaking, or Unmeaning Repetition, Be not like the heathens. Matthew 6:7.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/matthew-6.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Be not therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what thing's ye have need of, before ye ask him.

This, of course, is elementary wisdom. A God who needs to be told what men need could certainly not help if told! Prayers, giving God information, are as ridiculous as they are impious.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/matthew-6.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Be not ye therefore like unto them,..... Do not be imitators of them, and follow their ways, who have only the dim light of nature to guide them; it would be shameful in you to do as they do, when you have a divine revelation for your direction; and especially, because

your Father knoweth what things ye have need of before ye ask him; and therefore have no need to make use of many words, or much speaking, or long prayers. The omniscience of God is a considerable argument, and a great encouragement to prayer; he knows our persons and our wants before hand; and as he is able to help us, we have reason to believe he will; especially since he stands in the relation of a Father to us.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/matthew-6.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Be not ye therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of before ye ask him — and so needs not to be informed of our wants, any more than to be roused to attend to them by our incessant speaking. What a view of God is here given, in sharp contrast with the gods of the heathen! But let it be carefully noted that it is not as the general Father of mankind that our Lord says, “Your Father” knoweth what ye need before ye ask it; for it is not men, as such, that He is addressing in this discourse, but His own disciples - the poor in spirit, the mourners, the meek, hungry and thirsty souls, the merciful, the pure in heart, the peacemakers, who allow themselves to have all manner of evil said against them for the Son of man‘s sake - in short, the new-born children of God, who, making their Father‘s interests their own, are here assured that their Father, in return, makes their interests His, and needs neither to be told nor to be reminded of their wants. Yet He will have His children pray to Him, and links all His promised supplies to their petitions for them; thus encouraging us to draw near and keep near to Him, to talk and walk with Him, to open our every case to Him, and assure ourselves that thus asking we shall receive - thus seeking we shall find - thus knocking it shall be opened to us.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/matthew-6.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

For your Father knoweth. Here is given abundant reason for short prayers. Many prayers apparently aim to give God information on matters connected with this world.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/matthew-6.html. 1891.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Be not ye therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of, before ye ask him.

Your Father knoweth what things ye have need of — We do not pray to inform God of our wants. Omniscient as he is, he cannot be informed of any thing which he knew not before: and he is always willing to relieve them. The chief thing wanting is, a fit disposition on our part to receive his grace and blessing. Consequently, one great office of prayer is, to produce such a disposition in us: to exercise our dependence on God; to increase our desire of the things we ask for; to us so sensible of our wants, that we may never cease wrestling till we have prevailed for the blessing.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/matthew-6.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Be not therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of, before ye ask him1.

  1. For your Father knoweth what things ye have need of, before ye ask him. In stating that God knows our desires before we ask, Jesus gives the reason against vain repetitions. God does not need elaborate explanations, and prayer is not uttered to inform him, but to put ourselves in such communion with him as to make us fit to receive. Moreover, prayer is a matter of asking and receiving, and not a meritorious service, as Mohammedans and Catholics still hold, and as the Pharisees held. With them, as public prayers were to gain credit with men, so long and repeated prayers were to obtain merit before God. Christ teaches contrary to all this.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/matthew-6.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

8.For your Father knoweth This single remedy is sufficient for removing and destroying the superstition which is here condemned. For whence comes this folly of thinking that great advantage is gained, when men weary God by a multiplicity of words, but because they imagine that he is like a mortal man, who needs to be informed and solicited? Whoever is convinced, that God not only cares for us, but knows all our wants, and anticipates our wishes and anxieties before we have stated them, will leave out vain repetitions, and will reckon it enough to prolong his prayers, as far as shall be necessary for exercising his faith; but will reckon it absurd and ridiculous to approach God with rhetorical embellishments, in the expectation that he will be moved by an abundance of words.

But if God knows what things we have need of, before we ask him, where lies the advantage of prayer? If he is ready, of his own free will, to assist us, what purpose does it serve to employ our prayers, which interrupt the spontaneous course of his providence? The very design of prayer furnishes an easy answer. Believers do not pray, with the view of informing God about things unknown to him, or of exciting him to do his duty, or of urging him as though he were reluctant. On the contrary, they pray, in order that they may arouse themselves to seek him, that they may exercise their faith in meditating on his promises, that they may relieve themselves from their anxieties by pouring them into his bosom; in a word, that they may declare that from Him alone they hope and expect, both for themselves and for others, all good things. God himself, on the other hand, has purposed freely, and without being asked, to bestow blessings upon us; but he promises that he will grant them to our prayers. We must, therefore, maintain both of these truths, that He freely anticipates our wishes, and yet that we obtain by prayer what we ask. As to the reason why he sometimes delays long to answer us, and sometimes even does not grant our wishes, an opportunity of considering it will afterwards occur.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/matthew-6.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

8 Be not ye therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of, before ye ask him.

Ver. 8. Be not ye therefore like unto them] God would not have his Israel conform to the heathens’ customs, nor so much as once name their idols, Exodus 23:13; Psalms 16:4. No more should Christians (as some are of the opinion). {a} That of Cardinal Bembus is somewhat gross concerning their St Francis, quod in numerum Deorum ab Ecclesia Romana sit relatus. But this is like the rest; for if we may believe Baronius, we may see their lustral water and sprinkling of sepulchres in Juvenal’s sixth satire; lights in sepulchres, in Suetonius’ Octavius; lamps lighted on Saturday, in Seneca’s 96th Epistle; distribution of tapers among the people, in Macrob. Saturnals, &c.

For your heavenly Father knoweth what things ye need, &c.] And therefore answereth many times before we ask, Isaiah 65:24; as he did David, Psalms 32:1-11. He prevents us with many mercies we never sought him for; that our praises may exceed our prayers. "I am found of them that sought me not," saith God; but yet in the same place it is said, "I am sought of them that asked not for me," Isaiah 65:1. Importing, that we never seek to him for grace till effectually called by his grace. Howbeit, no sooner is any truly called, but he presently prayeth. Say not then, if God know our needs, what need we open them to him? The truth is, we do it not to inform him of that he knows not, {b} or to stir up mercy in him, who is all hearts, and perfectly pitieth us: but, 1. Hereby we acknowledge him as a child doth his father when he runs to him for food, Luke 11:13; Luke 2:1-52. We run that course of getting good things that he hath prescribed us, Jeremiah 29:11-12. Which Moses and Elijah knew, and therefore the former turned God’s predictions, the latter his promises, into prayers, Exodus 9:33; 1 Kings 18:37; 1 Kings 3:1-28. Hereby we prepare ourselves holily to enjoy the things we crave; for prayer both sanctifieth the creature and increaseth our love and thankfulness, Psalms 116:1; Psalms 4:1-8. Prayer prepareth us, either to go without that we beg, if God see fit, as David when he prayed for the child’s life, and was fitted thereby to bear the loss of it; or else to part with that which we have got by prayer, for the glory of God the giver of it. Those that make their requests known to God with thanksgiving, shall have (at least) the "peace of God that passeth all understanding," to guard their hearts and minds in Christ Jesus. { φρουρησει, Philippians 4:6-7} They shall have strength in their souls, the joy of the Lord shall be their strength, the glory of the Lord shall be their rereward, Psalms 138:3; Nehemiah 8:10; Isaiah 58:8. In their marching in the wilderness, at the fourth alarm, arose the standard of Dan, Asher, and Naphtali; these were the reguard of the Lord’s host; and to these were committed the care of gathering together the lame, feeble, and sick, and to look that nothing was left behind. Unto this the prophet Isaiah seems (in that text) to allude, and so doth David, Psalms 27:10; "When my father and mother forsake me, the Lord will gather me;" and this comfortable assurance was the fruit of his prayer.

{a} Non male dixit Tertullianus, Philosophos esse Haereticorum Patriarchas.

{b} Non sane ut Deus instruatur, sed ut mens nostra construatur.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/matthew-6.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

Warning against such absurd practices:

v. 8. Be not ye therefore like unto them; for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of before ye ask Him.

The Christians should differ from the heathen by a sharp distinction. They shall not be like the heathen; there shall be no point of resemblance between their worship and that of the heathen. Their idea of prayer is essentially unlike that of the Gentiles. "Prayer requires more of the heart than of the tongue. The eloquence of prayer consists in the fervency of desire and the simplicity of faith. The abundance of fine thoughts, studied and vehement motions, and the order and politeness of the expressions, are things which compose a mere human harangue, not a humble and Christian prayer. Our trust and confidence ought to proceed from that which God is able to do in us, and not from that which we can say to Him. " Another point bringing out the absurdity of "babbling prayers: our needs are known to God before we make them known in our prayers. As a true Father He is concerned about the wants and troubles of His children, and gets His information often before they are aware of their lack, Isa_65:24. "God commands us to pray, not indeed that we with our prayer should teach Him what He should give, but rather that we should realize and confess what kind of goods He gives to us, and will and can give much more; so that by our prayer we instruct our

selves more than Him."


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Bibliography
Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/matthew-6.html. 1921-23.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Matthew 6:8. Be not ye therefore like unto them This argument would be forcible against all prayer in general, if prayer were considered only as a means of making our wants known to God; whereas it is no more than an act of obedience to our heavenly Father, who has commanded us to pray to him, chap. Matthew 7:7 and made it a condition of his favours; an expression of our trust in him, and dependence on his goodness, whereby we acknowledge, that all the benefits we receive come from him, and that we must apply to him for the attainment of them. "These words, says Dr. Heylin, are highlyinstructive, and may serve to give us a solid and practical knowledge of the true nature of prayer." The proper end of prayer is not to inform God of our wants; omniscient as he is, he cannot be informed: the only thing wanting is a fit disposition on our part to receive his grace; and the proper office of prayer is, through the merit of Christ and the grace of his Spirit, to produce such a disposition in us, as to render us proper subjects for pardoning and sanctifying grace to work in; or, in other words, to remove the obstacles which we ourselves put to his goodness. Now the principal obstacles are, worldly-mindedness and self-love; whereby our desires cleave to earthly goods and corrupt selfish interests:but in prayer we suspend these desires, our heart being through grace turned so God only; and by whatever means we attain such a holy posture of mind, they are the proper means of true devotion. As long as our minds are attentive to God only, by whatever sentiment that attention is maintained, so long we pray. When such attention flags, we must renew it by passing on to some other consideration proper to keep our heart attached to God through Christ, and open to receive his pardoning or sanctifying communications.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/matthew-6.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

8. οἶδεν γάρ] εἰ οἶδε, φησίν, ὧν χρείαν ἔχομεν, τίνος ἕνεκεν εὔχεσθαι δεῖ; οὐχ ἵνα διδάξῃς, ἀλλʼ ἵνα ἐπικάμψῃς· ἵνα οἰκειωθῇς τῇ συνεχείᾳ τῆς ἐντεύξεως, ἵνα ταπεινωθῇς, ἵνα ἀναμνησθῇς τῶν ἁμαρτημάτων τῶν σῶν. Chrys. Hom. xix. 4, p. 249. ‘Ipsa orationis intentio cor nostrum serenat et purgat, capaciusque efficit ad accipienda divina munera, quæ spiritualiter nobis infunduntur.’ August. de Serm. Dom. ii. 3 (14).


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/matthew-6.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Matthew 6:8. οὖν] seeing that you are expected to shun heathen error.

οἶδε γὰρ, κ. τ. λ.] so that, this being the case, that βαττολογεῖν is superfluous.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/matthew-6.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Matthew 6:8. πρὸ κ. τ. λ., before, etc.) We pray, therefore, not with the view of instructing, but of adoring, the Father.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/matthew-6.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 7,8. It appeareth from hence, and from what followeth also, that the praying here spoken of is vocal prayer; not the mere homage which the heart payeth to God, by a recognition of him as the fountain of all good, and our secret desires that God would supply our wants, but the expression of those desires by the words of our mouths, which is that duty which the Scripture generally calleth prayer, and is most certainly a duty incumbent on every person. Nor are repetitions of the same requests in prayer, or much speaking, ( that is, praying to some length of time), here absolutely forbidden: our Saviour before his passion prayed thrice for the same thing within a short compass of time, (though he did not use the same words), and, Luke 6:12, he continued all night in prayer to God. But that which is here forbidden, is an opinion of being heard for over long prayers, and using vain repetitions, as the priests of Baal continued from morning to night crying, O Baal, hear us! O Baal, hear us! as if their god had been asleep, or gone a journey, as the prophet mocketh them, 1 Kings 18:26,27. Repetitions are then vain, when they are affected, and flow from some irreverent thoughts we have of God; not when they are as it were forced from the heat and intention of our affections. The like is to be said of much speaking in prayer. Long prayers are not to be condemned, but the affectation of them is, and long prayers upon pretences and designs are: but when the mind is attent, and the affections fervent, length of prayer is no fault, especially upon solemn occasions, when we come not to ask a particular mercy at the hand of God, nor for a particular person or family. But repetitions after the manner of heathens are condemned, as proceeding from irreverent thoughts of God, as if he did not know what things we have need of, or were, like a man, to be prevailed upon by a multitude of words.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/matthew-6.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

8. οἶδεν γὰρ ὁ πατὴρ κ.τ.λ. Our Father knows our wants, still we are bound to express them. Why? because this is a proof of our faith and dependence upon God, which are the conditions of success in prayer.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/matthew-6.html. 1896.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Matthew 6:8. Therefore, because these things are heathen; the temptation to adopt or retain heathen worship will arise.

For your Father, etc. Another and more important reason for avoiding such practices. Our prayers do not tell ‘our Father’ of our needs, but simply confess our consciousness of them, and our trust that He can and will supply them. Both of these feelings must precede answer to prayer. Hence the reason holds good against vain repetitions, not against childlike petitions.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/matthew-6.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Matthew 6:8, οὖν, infers that disciples must not imitate the practice described, because it is Pagan, and because it is absurd. Repetition is, moreover, wholly uncalled for.— οἶδεν γὰρ: the God whom Jesus proclaims—“your Father”—knows beforehand your needs. Why, then, pray at all? Because we cannot receive unless we desire, and if we desire, we will pray; also because things worth getting are worth asking. Only pray always as to a Being well informed and willing, in few words and in faith. With such thoughts in mind, Jesus proceeds to give a sample of suitable prayer.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/matthew-6.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

knoweth. Greek. oida. Very significant in this connection.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/matthew-6.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Be not ye therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of, before ye ask him.

Be not ye therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of before ye ask him - and so needs not to be informed of our wants, anymore than to be roused to attend to them by our incessant speaking. What a view of God is here given, in sharp contrast with the gods of the pagan! But let it be carefully noted that it is not as the general Father of Mankind that our Lord says, "Your Father" knoweth what ye need before ye ask it; because it is not men, as such, that He is addressing in this Discourse, but His own disciples-the poor in spirit, the mourners, the meek, hungry and thirsty souls, the merciful, the pure in heart, the peacemakers, who allow themselves to have all manner of evil said against them for the Son of Man's sake-in short, the newborn children of God, who, making their Father's interests their own, are here assured that their Father, in return, makes their interests His, and needs neither to be told nor to be reminded of their wants. Yet He will have His children pray to Him, and links all His premised supplies to their petitions for them; thus encouraging us to draw near and keep near to Him, to talk and walk with Him to open our every case to Him, and assure ourselves that thus asking we shall receive-thus seeking we shall find-thus knocking it shall be opened to us.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/matthew-6.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

Your Father already knows. Here is a good reason for short prayers. It isn't necessary for us to inform God of what is taking place in his world. But he does wish us to pray to him!


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/matthew-6.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) Your Father knoweth.—This truth is rightly made the ground of prayer in one of the noblest collects of the Prayer Book of the English Church—“Almighty God, the Fountain of all wisdom, who knowest our necessities before we ask, and our ignorance in asking.” Comp. St. Paul’s “We know not what we should pray for as we ought” (Romans 8:26). But why then, it may be asked, pray at all? Why “make our requests known unto God” (Philippians 4:6)? Logically, it may be, the question never has been, and never can be, answered. As in the parallel question of foreknowledge and free will, we are brought into a region in which convictions that seem, each of them, axiomatic, appear to contradict each other. All that can be done is to suggest partial solutions of the problem. We bring our wants and desires to God (1) that we may see them as He sees them, judge how far they are selfish or capricious, how far they are in harmony with His will; (2) that we may, in the thought of that Presence and its infinite holiness, feel that all other prayers—those which are but the expression of wishes for earthly good, or deliverance from earthly evil—are of infinitely little moment as compared with deliverance from the penalty and the power of the sin which we have made our own; (3) that, conscious of our weakness, we may gain strength for the work and the conflict of life in communion with the Eternal, who is in very deed a “Power that makes for righteousness.” These are, if we may so speak, the lines upon which the Lord’s Prayer has been constructed, and all other prayers are excellent in proportion as they approach that pattern. Partial deviations from it, as in prayers for fine weather, for plenty, and for victory, are yet legitimate (though they drift in a wrong direction), as the natural utterance of natural wants, which, if repressed, would find expression in superstition or despair. It is better that even these petitions, though not the highest form of prayer, should be purified by their association with the highest, than that they should remain unuttered as passionate cravings or, it may be, murmuring regrets.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/matthew-6.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Be not ye therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of, before ye ask him.
your
32; Psalms 38:9; 69:17-19; Luke 12:30; John 16:23-27; Philippians 4:6

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/matthew-6.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Prayer is not for the purpose of informing God about our needs for He already knows that. It is an occasion of showing our faith in the Heavenly Father.


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Bibliography
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Matthew 6:8". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/matthew-6.html. 1952.

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Monday, August 10th, 2020
the Week of Proper 14 / Ordinary 19
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