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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Matthew 7:8

"For everyone who asks receives, and he who seeks finds, and to him who knocks it will be opened.

Adam Clarke Commentary

For every one that asketh receiveth - Prayer is always heard after one manner or other. No soul can pray in vain that prays as directed above. The truth and faithfulness of the Lord Jesus are pledged for its success. - Ye Shall receive - ye Shall find - it Shall be opened. These words are as strongly binding on the side of God, as thou shalt do no murder is on the side of man. Bring Christ's word, and Christ's sacrifice with thee, and not one of Heaven's blessings can be denied thee. See on Luke 11:9; (note).


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/matthew-7.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

These words are far more than a promise to answer prayer; and, depending on what men pray for, they may be even a threat. Certainly, there is a statement of God's law that prayers, in some measure at least, determine the kind of answer. Goodspeed's translation is, "Ask, and what you ask will be given you. Search, and you will find what you search for."[3] Thus, if one pursues unworthy goals, he may attain them. Alas, many do. Prayers should be disciplined to request only those things which are truly desirable and should always submissively include the provision, "Nevertheless, not my will but thine be done" (Matthew 26:39).

Of all rash things, a rash prayer is the rashest. Rachel prayed, "Give me children, or else I die" (Genesis 30:1). God gave her children, "and she died" (Genesis 35:18). The children of Israel "lusted exceedingly in the wilderness, and tempted God in the desert. And he gave them their request, but sent leanness into their soul" (Psalms 106:14,15). Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote:

"God answers sharp and sudden on some prayers. And thrusts the thing we have prayed for in our face, A gauntlet with a gift in't."[4]

Ralph Waldo Emerson put it this way:

What we seek we shall find; what we flee from flees from us; as Goethe said, "What we wish for in youth, comes in heaps on us in old age," too often cursed with the granting of our prayer; and hence the high caution, that, since we are sure of having what we wish, we beware to ask only for high things.[5]

[3] Edgar J. Goodspeed, New Testament (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).

[4] Frank S. Mead, The Encyclopedia of Religious Quotations (Westwood, New Jersey: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1965), p. 338, from Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Aurora.

[5] Ibid., p. 339, from Ralph Waldo Emerson, Conduct of Life.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/matthew-7.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For everyone that asketh receiveth,.... For God is no respecter of persons; whoever makes application, be he a Jew, or a Gentile, rich or poor, bond or free, a man of great gifts, or mean parts, provided he asks aright, from right principles, and with right views, shall not lose his labour; but shall receive all such good things at the hand of God, as are suitable and convenient for him.

And he that seeketh findeth; he that seeks for God in Christ, the grace and mercy of God, the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; that seeks after the true riches, both of grace and glory, shall be sure to find them; see Proverbs 21:21.

And to him that knocketh it shall be opened: that is, to him that is constant at the throne of grace, who continues knocking at the door of mercy, and will have no denial, it shall be opened to him; and he shall have entrance into the holiest of all by the blood of Jesus.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/matthew-7.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened — Of course, it is presumed that he asks aright - that is, in faith - and with an honest purpose to make use of what he receives. “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering (undecided whether to be altogether on the Lord‘s side). For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed. For let not that man think that he shall receive any thing of the Lord” (James 1:5-7). Hence, “Ye ask, and receive not, because ye ask amiss, that ye may consume it upon your lusts” (James 4:3).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/matthew-7.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

For every one that asketh receiveth — Provided he ask aright, and ask what is agreeable to God's will.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/matthew-7.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

for every one that asketh receiveth1; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

  1. For every one that asketh receiveth. Jesus here uses the universal "every one", but he means every one of a class, for the term is modified by the prescribed conditions of acceptable prayer (Matthew 6:14,15 James 1:6,7; James 4:3; 1 John 5:14). We see also by Matthew 7:9 that it means every one who is recognized by God as a son. All God's children who pray rightly are heard.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/matthew-7.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

8.For every one that asketh receiveth Some think that this is a proverbial saying taken from common life: but I am more inclined to a different view. Christ presents the grace of his Father to those who pray. He tells us, that God is of himself prepared to listen to us, provided we pray to him, and that his riches are at our command, provided we ask them. These words imply, that those who are destitute of what is necessary, and yet do not resort to this remedy for their poverty, are justly punished for their slothfulness. It is certain, indeed, that often, when believers are asleep, God keeps watch over their salvation, and anticipates their wishes. Nothing could be more miserable for us than that, amidst our great indifference, or—I would rather say—amidst our great stupidity, God were to wait for our prayers, or that, amidst our great thoughtlessness, he were to take no notice of us. Nay more, it is only from himself that he is induced to bestow upon us faith, which goes before all prayers in order and in time. But as Christ here addresses disciples, he merely reminds us in what manner our heavenly Father is pleased to bestow upon us his gifts. Though he gives all things freely to us, yet, in order to exercise our faith, he commands us to pray, that he may grant to our requests those blessings which flow from his undeserved goodness.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/matthew-7.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

8 For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

Ver. 8. For every one that asketh receiveth, &c.] And he is worthily miserable that will not be happy for asking. "Prayer," saith Lambert the martyr, "is in Scripture much commended, and many great and unmeasurable benefits are shown to ensue thereupon, that men should the more lustily give themselves thereunto." Thus Jacob wrestling with God, both by might and slight (as the word אבק signifieth), both by the strength of his body and force of his faith, he grounded his prayer upon God’s gracious promise, which he rolls as sugar in his mouth, and repeats it again and again, Genesis 32:9; Genesis 32:12. See the same course taken, 2 Samuel 7:25; 1 Kings 8:25, &c.; Daniel 9:2-3, Psalms 12:5-7, Acts 4:25, &c. Cast anchor of hope in the darkest desertion, wait for day, and pray, as those in the shipwreck, Acts 27:33-44, pleading that precious promise, Isaiah 50:10. This help if we use not, we shall either pray coldly, offer incense without fire; or as the Pharisees, proudly; or as the Thessalonians, as men without hope; which is to deny our own prayers. He cannot possibly be poor that can pray in faith, because God is rich to all such, Romans 10:12, and giveth richly ( πλουσιως) to such as so ask, James 1:5. Never did the hand of faith knock in vain at God’s gate. The Aediles (or chamberlains) among the Romans had ever their doors standing open, for all that had occasion of request or complaint to have free access to them. God’s mercy doors are wide open to the prayers of his faithful people. The Persian kings held it a piece of their silly glory to deny an easy access to their greatest subjects. It was death to solicit them uncalled. Esther herself was afraid. But the King of heaven manifesteth himself to his people, John 14:21, calls to his spouse with, "Let me see thy face, let me hear thy voice," Song of Solomon 2:14; and assigneth her negligence herein as the cause of her soul sickness. The door of the tabernacle was not of any hard or debarring matter, but a veil, which is easily penetrable. And whereas in the temple none came near to worship but only the high priests, others stood without in the outer court; God’s people are now a kingdom of priests, and are said to worship in the temple and at the altar, Revelation 11:1; "Let us therefore draw near with a true heart, in full assurance of faith;" "let us come boldly to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need," Hebrews 10:22; Hebrews 4:16.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/matthew-7.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

8.] The only limitation to this promise, which, under various forms, is several times repeated by our Lord, is furnished in Matthew 7:9-11, and in James 4:3, αἰτεῖτε καὶ οὐ λαμβάνετε· διότι κακῶς αἰτεῖσθε.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/matthew-7.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Matthew 7:8. πᾶς, every one) that asketh, even from man, much more from God.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/matthew-7.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 7,8. Here is a precept expressed by three words, ask, seek, knock; and a promise annexed in three distinct terms,

it shall be given you, ye shall find, it shall be opened unto you. The thing commanded is prayer; the thing promised is an audience of prayer, or an answer to prayer. The multiplying of the terms in which the precept is expressed is not idle and superfluous, it lets us know our averseness to the duty, and that God in it requireth of us faith, diligence, constancy, and importunity. Christ had before told us of whom we should ask, our Father; it is not said what we should ask, both in regard we have a liberty to ask any thing we have need of, and he had, Matthew 6:8, particularly directed the matter of our prayers. The promise, that we shall have, signifies an answer, either in kind or in value; the promise of giving lets us know that our prayers are not meritorious.

For every one that asketh the things he needeth, and in faith, according to the will of God, and for a right end,

receiveth, & c. See James 4:3.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/matthew-7.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Every one; all who rightly ask, receive either what they ask or something better in its place.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/matthew-7.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8. Asketh receiveth — Coming into the kingdom of God, and under his paternity, we have the child’s right of petition. Gifts, even the highest gift, his own Holy Spirit, and much more all lower gifts suitable for us, will he grant. And the only limitation of our asking is that we confine ourselves to the proper relation of the child; and the only limitation of the gift, and so of the promise, is that God will give only what is suitable to his character as Father to grant. The child cannot expect to command favours out of his proper sphere, or at the improper time. Of these the parent is the wise judge. So the child of the heavenly Father must not interpret this promise licentiously, as if God would obey his orders at the moment he chooses. The promise only affirms that, unlike the Gentile, he enjoys the privileges of accepted prayer, and receives the returns that the infinite Father sees best.

Seeketh findeth — To seek is a stronger act than to ask. Not everything is obtained by the means and at the moment of uttered supplication. What we are to seek first, we are told in Matthew 5:33. It is the kingdom of God and his righteousness, in opposition to all those things which the Gentiles seek, Matthew 5:32. And in that kingdom, revelations of wisdom and goodness, of experience and attainment, are granted to him who earnestly employs his day and strength in seeking. Knock… opened — And this completes the climax. Knock, and the strait gate (Matthew 7:14) and the narrow way shall be opened unto you. And if we continue to knock through life, the heavenly kingdom above will open its everlasting doors. Those, indeed, there will be who will begin to stand without and to knock at the door, (Luke 13:25,) and the voice of the Lord will pierce through the door still closed, saying, Depart. There are Gentiles in heathendom that know not the heavenly Father, and Gentiles in Christendom that know not the Son.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/matthew-7.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

A For every one who asks receives,

B And he who seeks finds,

C And to him who knocks it will be opened.

And as they persevere in prayer for the coming of His Kingly Rule and the power of His Holy Spirit, along with all His other precious gifts, they will ask and will receive, they will seek and find His presence and all that He has promised them, they will knock and His door will be opened to welcome them and to give them His provision (compare Hebrews 10:19-23). It should be noted that this is not a suggestion that they may receive whatever they ask for regardless of what it is. There is nothing selfish about what they are to seek here. For the context limits its significance to ‘what is holy’, to what His own prayer provided for them as the basis for their asking, and to the other gifts offered throughout His Sermon. But what could be greater than those? Indeed what is requested there should be our chief concern. That is why He taught them the Lord’s Prayer (it comes in the same context in Luke where it is connected to similar words to these), and that is why He promised them gifts and rewards. For the whole aim behind all this is that they might come to know the Father more really and intensely, might carry forward His will, and might have real confidence in Him.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/matthew-7.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Matthew 7:8. For every one that asketh, etc. An invariable rule; a plain promise, not for the future, but for the present, since our Lord says: receiveth, findeth, it is opened. This promise, several times repeated by our Lord, is limited only by the verses which follow; comp., however, James 4:3, ‘Ye ask and receive not; because ye ask amiss.’ God always answers the right kind of prayer, but in His own right way.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/matthew-7.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Matthew 7:8, teration in form of a general proposition: πᾶς γὰρ, for every one, etc.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/matthew-7.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

we ask necessary to salvation with humility, fervour, perseverance, and other due circumstances, we may be assured God will grant when it is best for us. If we do not obtain what we pray for, we must suppose it is not conducive to our salvation, in comparison of which all else is of little moment. (Haydock)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/matthew-7.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

For everyone that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened. Of course, it is presumed that he asked aright-that is, in faith-and with an honest purpose to make use of what he receives. "If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering (undecided whether to be altogether on the Lord's side). For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed. For let not that man think that he shall receive any thing of the Lord" (James 1:5-7). Hence, "Ye ask, and receive not, because ye ask amiss, that ye may consume it upon your lusts" (James 4:3).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/matthew-7.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.
15:22-28; 2 Chronicles 33:1,2,19; Psalms 81:10,16; John 2:2; 3:8-10; Luke 23:42,43; Acts 9:11

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/matthew-7.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

This is an assurance of fulfillment of the preceding verse, the key to it being in the words every one. Since God is no respecter of persons (Acts 10:34), it follows that all who meet the conditions set forth in the preceding verse will be favored of God without partiality as to who the individual is.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Matthew 7:8". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/matthew-7.html. 1952.

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