Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Numbers 11:10

Now Moses heard the people weeping throughout their families, each man at the doorway of his tent; and the anger of the Lord was kindled greatly, and Moses was displeased.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Anger;   Manna;   Moses;   Murmuring;   Trouble;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Desert, Journey of Israel through the;   Manna;  
Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Grace;   Moses;   Prayer;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Discontent;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Meat;   Numbers, Book of;   Wrath, Wrath of God;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Moses;   Numbers, Book of;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elder;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - On to Canaan;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Wrath (Anger);   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Anger;   Sanhedrin;  

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"And Moses heard the people weeping throughout their families, every man at the door of his tent: and the anger of Jehovah was kindled greatly; and Moses was displeased, And Moses said unto Jehovah, Wherefore hast thou dealt with thy servant? and wherefore have I not found favor in thy sight, that thou layest the burden of all this people upon me? Have I conceived all this people? have I brought them forth, that thou shouldest say unto me, Carry them in thy bosom, as a nursing-father carrieth a sucking child, unto the land which thou swarest unto their fathers? Whence should I have flesh to give unto all this people? for they weep unto me, saying, Give us flesh, that we may eat. I am not able to bear all this people alone, because it is too heavy for me. And if thou deal thus with me, kill me, I pray thee, out of hand, if I have found favor in thy sight; and let me not see my wretchedness."

"Every man at the door of his tent ..." (Numbers 11:10). How can it be supposed that this was anything other than an organized demonstration? We believe that this very fact lies behind the statement that Jehovah's anger was kindled "greatly." "Such a public and obtrusive a demonstration of grief must, of course, have been organized."[14]

One can easily understand the frustration and desperation of Moses. From his point of view, the situation was just about unbearable. His request that God would slay him is like that of Jonah and Elijah, other great men of God, who requested God's release of them from the duties and burdens of life. It cannot be that Moses was without sin in the events of this chapter. There is one vast difference, however, between Moses' sin here and that which took place at the waters of Meribah. That sin was in the presence of the people, and this one was committed in his subjective attitude toward the Lord. It appears that Moses' failure at Meribah to sanctify the Lord "in the presence of the people" was a far greater transgression. To say the least, Moses' desperate situation here is understandable enough.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/numbers-11.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then Moses heard the people weep throughout their families,.... So general was their lusting after flesh, and their discontent for want of it; and so great their distress and uneasiness about it, that they wept and cried for it, and so loud and clamorous, that Moses heard the noise and outcry they made:

every man in the door of his tent: openly and publicly, were not ashamed of their evil and unbecoming behaviour, and in order to excite and encourage the like temper and disposition in others; though it may have respect, as some have observed, to the door of the tent of Moses, about which they gathered and mutinied; and which better accounts for his hearing the general cry they made; and so in an ancient writing of the Jews it is saidF12Siphri apud Yalkut in loc. , they were waiting for Moses until he came out at the door of the school; and they were sitting and murmuring:

and the anger of the Lord was kindled greatly; because of their ingratitude to him, their contempt of the manna he had provided for them, and their hankering after their poor fare in Egypt, and for which they had endured so much hardship and ill usage, and for the noise and clamour they now made:

Moses also was displeased; with the people on the same account, and with the Lord also for laying and continuing so great a burden upon him, as the care of this people, which appears by what follows.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/numbers-11.html. 1999.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Paul's advice on this subject is very earnest, 1 Corinthians 10:1-11. But what I would most earnestly beg the Reader to keep in view in this history is, the spiritual illustration of it by Paul. He calls it spiritual meat; and positively explains it, in the Chapter I have just referred to, in reference to the LORD JESUS. Hence the LORD'S anger was greatly kindled at the people's contempt of it. And the reason is obvious. It was in effect despising his rich salvation, and preferring the Egyptian bondage to the freedom of the gospel. Reader! how stands the case with your soul? Do you prefer the bread of life in the wilderness state with JESUS for your portion, to all the luxuries of Egypt in the carnal enjoyment of sin for a season? May the LORD give you and me the faith spoken of. Hebrews 11:24-26.

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Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/numbers-11.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then Moses heard the people weep throughout their families, every man in the door of his tent: and the anger of the LORD was kindled greatly; Moses also was displeased.

In the door of his tent — To note they were not ashamed of their sin.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/numbers-11.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Numbers 11:10 Then Moses heard the people weep throughout their families, every man in the door of his tent: and the anger of the LORD was kindled greatly; Moses also was displeased.

Ver. 10. Weep throughout their families.] Generally and openly they rebelled and murmured, though so lately they had smarted at Taberah. And this they did, not once or twice, but ten times over; whereby it appears that God chose this unthankful people, not for their merits, sed ex mera et mira misericordia. He chose them for his love, and loved them for his choice.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/numbers-11.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

In the door of his tent; to note, that they were not ashamed of their sin.

Moses was displeased; partly, for their great unthankfulness; partly, foreseeing the dreadful judgments coming upon them, and partly, for his own burden expressed in the following verses.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/numbers-11.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10.Every man — This indicates the universality of the disaffection.

In the door of his tent — Not secretly but publicly giving vent to his tears and complaints. The anger of the Lord was justly kindled in view of the ingratitude of the people for their deliverance from bondage, their forgetfulness of past mercies, their contempt for present blessings, and their distrust of the divine guidance. Faith never complains.

Moses also was displeased — His very sympathy with Jehovah required this displeasure. Anger in the interest of God and justice, and not asthe expression of personal resentment, is not only innocent but is demanded. Plato says, that he who cannot be angry at an outrage upon innocence is like a man with a withered muscle.

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/numbers-11.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

By. Hebrew, "for." Jonathan and others endeavour to excuse their ancestors, by saying that they wept because they were forbidden to marry their near relations. --- His tent. Some explain the Hebrew of the tent of Moses. But the Israelites more probably staid at home.

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Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/numbers-11.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

man. Hebrew. "ish. App-14.

door = entrance.

Moses also was displeased = it was evil in Moses" eyes, as in Numbers 11:1.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/numbers-11.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) Moses also was displeased.—Or, And it was evil (or, displeasing) in the eyes of Moses. Moses was displeased with the people on account of their murmuring, and he was oppressed with the heavy burden of responsibility to which he felt himself unequal.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/numbers-11.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then Moses heard the people weep throughout their families, every man in the door of his tent: and the anger of the LORD was kindled greatly; Moses also was displeased.
weep throughout
14:1,2; 16:27; 21:5; Psalms 106:25
the anger
1; Deuteronomy 32:22; Psalms 78:21,59; Isaiah 5:25; Jeremiah 17:4
Moses
12:3; 20:10-13; Psalms 106:32,33; 139:21; Mark 3:5; 10:14
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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/numbers-11.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10.Then Moses heard the people weep. Wonderful indeed, and almost prodigious was the madness of the people, thus all of them to mourn as if reduced to the extremity of despair. What would they have done in actual famine? what if they had to gnaw bitter roots, almost without any juice in them? What if they had had to live on tasteless and unwholesome bread? We see, therefore, how by the indulgence of their depraved lusts men make themselves wretched in the very midst of prosperity. Let us, then, learn to bridle our excessive passions, that we may not bring upon ourselves troubles and inconveniences, and all sorts of painful feelings; for if the cause be duly weighed, when men afflict themselves with sorrow and lamentation, we shall generally find that, whereas the evil might be lightened by endurance, its pain is increased by preposterous imaginations. But here a gross instance of luxury is set before us, when, in their satiety, they weep as if long abstinence threatened them with death. It was an effect of holy and praiseworthy zeal, that this great perverseness should displease Moses; but he was not without error in carrying it to excess; for he unjustly expostulates with God, complaining that He had laid too heavy a burden upon him, when tie knew all the time that he was sustained by His power. His charge was indeed difficult and laborious; but in that he had experienced God’s wondrous aid, whenever he had groaned beneath his burden, there was no room for complaint; besides, since he had been dignified by a peculiar honor, it was ungrateful to brand with disgrace the good gift of God. He reputes it his greatest evil that the charge of governing the people had been intrusted to him; whereas all his senses ought rather to have been ravished with astonishment, that God had condescended to choose him to be the redeemer of His people, and the minister of His wondrous power. This, too, was very inconsiderate, to ask whether he had begotten or brought forth the people; as if his calling by God did not lay him sufficiently under obligation, or as if there were no other ties than those of nature. God, indeed, has inspired parents with such love towards their offspring, that they willingly undergo incredible troubles on their account; but Moses was bound by another kind of piety, for by God’s command he was father of the people. Wherefore he ought not to have only regarded nature, but the obligation of his office also.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Numbers 11:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/numbers-11.html. 1840-57.