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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Philippians 4:9

The things you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Those things, which ye have - learned - From my preaching and writing;

And received - By faith, as a revelation from God;

And heard - From my preaching, and that of those who labored with me; and heard from me, in my private communications with you; and heard of me from other Churches;

And seen in me - While living and labouring among you;

Do - Take them for the rule of your faith and practice.

And the God of peace - He who is the author of peace, the lover of peace, and the maintainer of peace; he who has made peace between heaven and earth, by the mission and sacrifice of his Son, shall be ever with you while you believe and act as here recommended.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/philippians-4.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Those things which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and seen in me, do - That is, what you have witnessed in me, and what you have learned of me, and what you have heard about me, practice yourselves. Paul refers them to his uniform conduct - to all that they had seen, and known, and heard of him, as that which it was proper for them to imitate. The same thing, substantially, he urges in Phlippians 3:17; see the notes at that verse. It could have been only the consciousness of a pure and upright life which would make such counsel proper. How few are the people at this day who can urge others to imitate all that they have seen in them, and learned from them, and heard of them.

And the God of peace shall be with you - The God who gives peace; compare Hebrews 13:20; 1 Thessalonians 5:23; see also the notes at Phlippians 4:7. The meaning here is, that Paul, by pursuing the course of life which he had led, and which he here counsels them to follow, had found that it had been attended with the blessing of the God of peace, and he felt the fullest assurance that the same blessing would rest on them if they imitated his example. The way to obtain the blessing of the God of peace, is to lead a holy life, and to perform with faithfulness all the duties which we owe to God and to our fellow-men.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/philippians-4.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Philippians 4:9

Those things which ye have both learned and received--Observe

I.
The apostle’s example. He preached, practised, experienced the truth.

II. Its permanent force. Still heard and seen in the word of inspiration--accompanied with Divine power and blessing. (J. Lyth, D. D.)

Observe

I. The apostle’s conscious integrity.

II. His bright example of faith, zeal, self-consecration, purity.

III. Its authority as a rule.

IV. The advantage of copying it. Peace on earth--in heaven. (J. Lyth, D. D.)

The force of example

During the siege of Sebastopol, Gordon was one day going the round of the trenches, when he heard an angry altercation between a corporal and a sapper. On inquiring the cause, he learnt that the men were instructed to place some gablons on the battery, and that the corporal had ordered the sapper to stand on the parapet, where he would be exposed to the enemy’s fire, and to place the gabions, while he, perfectly sheltered, handed them up from below. Gordon at once jumped upon the parapet, ordering the corporal to join him, while the sapper handed them the gabions. When the work was done, and done under the fire of the watchful Russian gunners, Gordon turned to the corporal, and said, “Never order a man to do anything that you are afraid to do yourself.”


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Philippians 4:9". The Biblical Illustrator. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/philippians-4.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

The things which ye both learned and received and heard and saw in me, these things do: and the God of peace shall be with you.

This is the equivalent of Paul's frequent admonitions to follow (or imitate) him as he followed (or imitated) Christ. See under Philippians 3:17.

The God of peace ... In Philippians 4:7, Paul had written "the peace of God"; and, as Barry said, "The inversion is striking."[26] The peace of God passes all understanding, but the God of peace is more, peace being that which is given, and God being the giver.

ENDNOTE:

[26] Ibid.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/philippians-4.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

These things which ye have both learned,.... Meaning from himself, in a doctrinal way:

and received; not only into their heads but hearts, had embraced cordially, with great affection, in the love thereof, as well as given a full assent to:

and heard; either publicly or privately, from the pulpit, or in conversation; or had heard of him when absent, or from him when present:

and seen in me: in his life and conversation, which were well known, and were a pattern to them that believe; and therefore he adds,

do; practise the same things which they had learned from him as their duty, and had heard him urge as such, and had seen exemplified in himself:

and the God of peace shall be with you; to give that peace which is beyond the conception of a natural man, and the expression of a spiritual one, and is the great preservative through Christ; and to enable to do and to continue to do the above things, and to keep them from all harm, and every enemy of their souls; to favour them with his gracious presence here, and with endless peace hereafter.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/philippians-4.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

these practice”; the things which besides recommending them in words, have been also recommended by my example, carry into practice.

heard — though ye have not yet sufficiently “received” them.

seen — though ye have not as yet sufficiently “learned” them [Bengel].

and — “and then,” as the necessary result (Phlippians 4:7). Not only “the peace of God,” but “the God of peace” Himself “shall be with you.”


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/philippians-4.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

In me (εν εμοιen emoi). Paul dares to point to his life in Philippi as an illustration of this high thinking. The preacher is the interpreter of the spiritual life and should be an example of it.

These things do (ταυτα πρασσετεtauta prassete). Practise as a habit (πρασσωprassō not ποιεωpoieō).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/philippians-4.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and seen in me, do: and the God of peace shall be with you.

The things which ye have learned — As catechumens.

And received — By continual instructions.

And heard and seen — In my life and conversation.

These do, and the God of peace shall be with you — Not only the peace of God, but God himself, the fountain of peace.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/philippians-4.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

9.What things ye have learned, and received, and heard By this accumulation of terms he intimates, that he was assiduous in inculcating these things. “This was my doctrine — my instruction — my discourse among you.” Hypocrites, on the other hand, insisted upon nothing but ceremonies. Now, it was a dishonorable thing to abandon the holy instruction, (244) which they had wholly imbibed, and with which they had been thorouglly imbued.

You have seen in me Now, the main thing in a public speaker (245) should be, that he may speak, not with his mouth merely, but by his life, and procure authority for his doctrine by rectitude of life. Paul, accordingly, procures authority for his exhortation on this ground, that he had, by his life no less than by his mouth, been a leader and master of virtues.

And the God of peace He had spoken of the peace of God; he now more particularly confirms what he had said, by promising that God himself, the Author of peace, will be with them. For the presence of God brings us every kind of blessing: as though he had said, that they would feel that God was present with them to make all things turn out well and prosperously, provided they apply themselves to pious and holy actions.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/philippians-4.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

9 Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and seen in me, do: and the God of peace shall be with you.

Ver. 9. And heard, and seen in me] Est aliquid quod ex magno viro vel tacente proficias. The very sight, nay, thought, of a good man often doth good. Whereas the tongue or heart of a wicked man "is little worth," Proverbs 10:20. If their thoughts and discourses were distilled, they are so frothy they would hardly yield one drop of true comfort.

And the God of peace] "Not only the peace of God," as Philippians 4:7. Austin somewhere fisheth a mystery out of the word pax, peace, which consisteth of three letters, saith he, to note the Trinity, from whom is all true peace. Others have observed that all the letters in Jehovah are quiescent, be at peace, letters to teach the same truth.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/philippians-4.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Philippians 4:9. The God of peace So called, on account of his affording us peace with himself; as he is called the God of all grace, 1 Peter 5:10 on account of all the favours that he bestows upon us. See Hebrews 13:20. 1 Thessalonians 5:23.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/philippians-4.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe, 1. With what great confidence and good assurance St. Paul here recommended his own practice and example to his people's imitation: all those things which he had by his doctrine and life commended to them, were to be carefully observed and imitated by them. It is a blessed thing, when a people's eyes are taught by their minister's holiness of life, and their ears by the soundness of his doctrine.

Our people have eyes to see how we walk, as well as ears to hear what we preach; therefore it is a minister's great duty, by strictness and gravity of deportment, to maintain his esteem in the consciences of his people, yet always tempering gravity with a condescending affability. That minister only can go off the stage with honor and comfort, who has left behind him the good seed of sound doctrine, and the good savour of an holy example; that can say with our apostle, The things which you have both heard and seen in me, do.

Observe, 2. The promise annexed to the foregoing precept, These things do, and the God of peace shall be with you.

Where note, 1. Who will be with us: the God of peace: now he that is the God of peace, is the God of power; he that is the God of peace, is the God of patience, who, though he can punish, yet he will pardon the infirmities of his people.

Note, 2. How he will be with us: the heart of God will be with us, and the help and presence of God will be with us, to guide and direct us, to lead and conduct us, to cover and protect us; and, if God be with us, we shall shortly be with him.

Learn hence, That those which obey the gospel, whatsoever or whomsoever they want, shall ever abide in a peaceful and blessed condition: These things do, and the God of peace shall be with you.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/philippians-4.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

9.] These general abstract things he now particularizes in the concrete us having been exemplified and taught by himself when among them. The first καί is not ‘both,’ as E. V., but also,—moreover: which, besides what I have said recommending them above, were also recommended to you by my own example.

ἐμάθετε] again, not as E. V. ‘have learned,’ &c.—but all aorists,—referring to the time when he was among them. Those things which (not ‘whatsoever things:’ we are on generals no longer: nor would he recommend to them all his own sayings and doings; but the καί expressly provides for their being of the kinds specified above) ye moreover learned, and received (reff.: here of receiving not by word of mouth, but by knowledge of his character: the whole is not doctrinal, but ethical) and heard (again not of preaching, but of his tried and acknowledged Christian character, which was in men’s mouths and thus heard) and saw (each for himself) in me ( ἐν ἐμοί will not properly belong to the two first verbs, ἐμάθ. and παρελ., but must be associated by zeugma with them—he himself being clearly the example throughout), these things ( ταῦτα) practise (correlative with, not opposed to, λογίζεσθε above:—that λογισμός being eminently practical, and issuing, in the concrete, in the ταῦτα πράσσειν, after Paul’s example).

καί] and then: see Philippians 4:7. On εἰρήνη, see there.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/philippians-4.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 2162

PAUL AN EXAMPLE FOR US

Philippians 4:9. Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and. seen in me, do: and the God of peace shall be with you.

NO man was ever move averse to boasting than the Apostle Paul: and, when compelled to declare what God had done in him or by him, he appeared to himself “a fool,” for uttering it; though he was conscious that he acted, not from choice, but from absolute and indispensable necessity. But, in truth, what might be called boasting in an uninspired man, was not deserving of that name in him; because he knew that he had been raised up by God, to be an instructor to mankind, both in his doctrines and example. Hence he not only affirmed, that “his word was the word, not of man, but of God [Note: 1 Thessalonians 2:13.];” but exhorted men to “be followers and imitators of him [Note: 1 Corinthians 4:16.],” “even as he was of Christ [Note: 1 Corinthians 11:1. μιμηταί.].” In the chapter preceding our text, he speaks strongly to this effect: “Brethren, be followers together of me, and mark them who walk so, as ye have us for an ensample [Note: Philippians 3:17.].” Nor did he confine his exhortation to a reception of his doctrines merely: he suggested the same in reference to his conduct also [Note: 2 Thessalonians 3:9.]. He was a great advocate for practical religion; and urged on his Philippian converts a diligent attention to “every thing which was true, and honest, and just, and pure, and lovely, and of good report:” and then, in reference both to his precepts and example, he added, “Those things which ye have both learned and received, and heard and seen in me, do; and the God of peace shall be with you.”

To enforce this exhortation, I will set before you,

I. The lessons he has taught us—

Of course, I can speak of these but in a very general and superficial way. Your time would not suffice for a full consideration of them; nor does my present subject require more than a brief notice of what he inculcated as due,

1. To God—

[It was not “a divided heart” that he called on men to offer to their God and Saviour: he taught them to surrender up themselves as living sacrifices to him; and to be as entirely devoted to him, as a victim is when offered upon the altar. As for our own ease, pleasure, interest, he would not have us consult them for a moment, in comparison of, and still less in opposition to, the will of God: “No man,” says he, “liveth to himself, and no man dieth to himself: for, whether we live, we live unto the Lord; and whether we die, we die unto the Lord: whether we live therefore, or die, we are the Lord’s: for to this end Christ both died, and rose, and revived, that he might be the Lord both of the dead and living [Note: Romans 14:7-9.].” And this duty he binds upon us by the strongest of all obligations, even that of redeeming love, which it were most criminal to resist: “Ye are not your own: ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God with your body and your spirit, which are God’s [Note: 1 Corinthians 6:20.].” He would have the whole spirit, soul, and body, sanctified unto the Lord [Note: 1 Thessalonians 5:23.].”]

2. To man—

[This duty, also, is co-extensive with the former, only in subordination to God, and with a view to his glory. There is nothing which we are not to do for man, nor any thing which we are not willingly to suffer for him, if only we may be instrumental to the promoting of his spiritual and eternal welfare. And the Apostle inculcates this with the same precision and force as the former: “Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others.” (We are to forget self, with a view to his benefit, as much as we are with a view to God’s glory.) “Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus; who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God; but made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of man: and being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross [Note: Philippians 2:4-8.].” Did our blessed Lord, who was God equal with the Father, empty himself of all his glory, and suffer the most excruciating torments, for the salvation of men? There is nothing, then, which we also should not be ready either to do or suffer for the welfare of their souls.

It may however be asked, What are we to do, if they become our enemies, and seek to destroy us? I answer, Contend with them: if they will fight, so do ye fight: and the more they exert themselves, the greater let your efforts be also. Only remember, that your weapon must not be like theirs: They fight with evil; but you must have no weapon but good. Nor must you ever yield to them; but to your latest hour, and with your latest breath, you must keep up the conflict, even as the first martyr Stephen did. This is St. Paul’s own direction, “Be not overcome of evil; but overcome evil with good [Note: Romans 12:21.].”]

Such are the duties which St. Paul inculcates: and this view of them will lead us to notice,

II. The example he has set us—

As, in his Epistle to Timothy, St. Paul says, “Thou hast fully known my doctrine, and manner of life [Note: 2 Timothy 3:10.];” so he here refers the Philippians, first, to what they had “learned and received from him;” and then, to what they had “heard and seen in him.”

1. What, then, were his principles?

[They were precisely and practically such as he had inculcated on others. Did he enjoin on others to be dead to the world, and to self? Hear what he declares to have been his own experience; “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live: yet not I, but Christ liveth in me; and the life which I now live in the flesh, I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me [Note: Galatians 2:20.].” Yea, so entirely was he under the constrained sense of redeeming love, that he shuddered at the very thought of glorying in any thing but the cross of Christ,” and more especially because, “through the influence of that, the whole world was crucified unto him, as he also was unto the world [Note: Galatians 6:14.].”]

2. With these his whole life was in perfect unison—

[Nothing could abate his zeal for God. Not all the trials which human nature is capable of sustaining could move him in the least: he counted not life itself dear to him, if he were called to sacrifice it for righteousness’ sake: on the contrary, he was ready to suffer bonds, or death, at any time, and in any way, for the honour of his Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ [Note: Acts 20:24; Acts 21:13.]. Nor were there any bounds to his love to man. He panted for the salvation of all men, and especially of those who were “his brethren according to the flesh:” and, when he could not prevail on them to embrace the Gospel which he offered to them, he called God to witness what grief their obduracy occasioned him: “I say the truth in Christ, I lie not, my conscience also bearing me witness in the Holy Ghost, that I have great heaviness, and continual sorrow in my heart, for my brethren’s sake [Note: Romans 9:1-2.].” Still more, for the prosperity of his converts he was so anxious, that his whole soul was, as it were, wrapt up in them: “Now I live, if ye stand fast in the Lord [Note: 1 Thessalonians 3:8.].” And so far was he from regretting any thing that he suffered for their sake, that he accounted such sufferings his privilege, his honour, his happiness: “If,” says he, “I be offered upon the sacrifice and service of your faith, I joy and rejoice with you all: for the same cause do ye also joy and rejoice with me [Note: Philippians 2:17-18.].”]

And, now, who can doubt,

III. The blessedness of taking him for our model?

Doubtless here is a high standard for us to aim at: but no lower standard can possibly be admitted. What, if we cannot attain to the eminence of St. Paul? we should not willingly rest in any thing short of it; or, if we had even attained to it, we should, like him, press forward for still higher attainments, that, if possible, we might be “pure as Christ himself was pure,” and “perfect even as our Father who is in heaven is perfect.” And to this we are encouraged by St. Paul, who says, “Those things which ye have learned and received, and heard and seen in me, do; and the God of peace shall be with you.” Now, it is certainly true, that if we aspire thus after universal holiness, God will be with us,

1. In a way of special manifestation—

[He assumes the endearing name of “the God of peace,” as he does elsewhere of “the God of love and peace [Note: 2 Corinthians 13:14.]:” and under this character will he reveal himself to his obedient people. Yes, “great peace shall they have who love his law,” “a perfect peace,” “a peace that passeth all understanding.” What terms would suffice to give any adequate idea of “the love of God shed abroad in the heart,” and of “the light of his reconciled countenance lifted up upon the soul?” You would in vain attempt to convey to a person who had all his days been immured in a dark dungeon, a just conception of the splendour and influence of the meridian sun: how then can the feeble language of mortality describe the action of Almighty God upon the soul, which he deigns to visit with his more immediate presence? Suffice it however to say, that such visits are realized in the souls of God’s faithful people; and that “both the Father and the Son will come down to them, and dwell in them, and make their abode with them [Note: John 14:21; John 14:23.],” and turn their very souls into the sanctuary of the Most High.]

2. In a way of effectual support—

[Persons who resemble the Apostle Paul in their spirit and conduct will be sure to resemble him, in some degree at least, in his trials and afflictions. It is not possible but that those who love darkness rather than light, should hate such lights as these. In truth the more bright a man’s light shines before an ungodly world, the more must he expect to be hated, reviled, and persecuted, even as our incarnate God himself was, during the time of his sojourning on earth: for “the servant cannot be above his Lord:” and “if they called the Master of the house of Beelzebub, much more will they those of his household [Note: Matthew 10:25.].” But, need the godly indulge any fears on that account? No; for “greater is be He that is in them, than he that is in the world [Note: 1 John 4:4.].” Men may assault you with all their might: but it may be confidently asked, “Who is he that shall harm you, if ye be followers of that which is good [Note: 1 Peter 3:13.]?” Men may keep all human aid from you: but who can intercept the visits of your God? Hear his own express promise, given for your encouragement and support: “Fear thou not, for I am with thee; be not dismayed; for I am thy God: I will strengthen thee; yea, I will help thee; yea, I will uphold thee with the right hand of my righteousness.” And then, lest a sense of your own weakness, and of the overbearing power of your enemies, should discourage you, he adds, “Fear not, thou worm Jacob: I will make thee a new sharp threshing instrument, having teeth; and thou shalt thresh the mountains [Note: Isaiah 41:10; Isaiah 41:14-16.].” Yes truly, “if God be for you, who can be against you [Note: Romans 8:31.]?”]

3. In a way of complete and everlasting fruition—

[“Whom God loveth, he loveth to the end [Note: John 13:1.]:” and if he be with us as a God of peace in this world, he will be with us under the same endearing character to all eternity. What he said to Abraham personally, he says to all the children of Abraham: “Fear not; I am thy shield, and thy exceeding great reward [Note: Genesis 15:1.].” The present state of the Church, with all her privileges and blessings, is only a prelude to, and a preparation for, a state of far higher blessedness; as St. John expressly informs us: “I, John, saw the holy city, New Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a great voice out of heaven, saying, Behold, the Tabernacle of God is with men; and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people; and God himself shall be with them, and be their God [Note: Revelation 21:23.].” “Then will all trials, of whatever kind, have passed away,” and their bliss be absolutely perfect: “the sun itself shall be no more their light by day, neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto them; but the Lord himself shall be to them an everlasting light, and their God their glory [Note: Revelation 21:4; Revelation 22:5. with Isaiah 60:19.].”]

Address—

1. The lukewarm Christian—

[How unlike art thou to the Apostle Paul! Should not this very circumstance make thee tremble for thy state? How couldest thou venture, even in the most qualified manner, to address those who have witnessed thy life and conversation in terms resembling those which St. Paul used in my text? Thou hast not the divine presence even with thine own soul. Thou knowest not what it is to have God with thee as “a God of peace;” manifesting himself to thee, and filling thee with his consolations. If thou wert to address any as the Apostle did, thine own conscience would remonstrate with thee, as a deceiver, and an enemy both to God and man. So far from God approving of thy state, he speaks of it in such terms of abhorrence as modern delicacy almost forbids one to repeat [Note: Revelation 3:16.]. I pray you, brethren, rest not in a state so fatal to yourselves, and so injurious to all around you. The very circumstance of your having some little regard for God, is that which is most likely to deceive yourselves and all around you. Awake, I pray you, from your delusion, lest you perish under the accumulated guilt of dishonouring God more than any professedly ungodly men can do; and of betraying, to their eternal ruin, multitudes, who fix on you for their standard and example.]

2. Those who desire to approve themselves truly unto God—

[Fix your standard high: take the Holy Scriptures for your guide; and the Apostle Paul as second only to Christ himself for your example. Be not afraid of being “righteous overmuch,” provided only that you are righteous in a proper manner. You can never love God too much: nor can you ever love man too much, provided you love him in subserviency to God. Methinks you may advance far beyond what you have already attained, before you will equal the Apostle Paul: and if at this moment you even equalled him, you would still be far from having already attained the perfection at which you should aim. Study then his character; mark it in its sublimest traits; and follow it in the whole of your life and conversation. Let his principles be yours; his spirit yours; his conduct yours. This is the way to honour God, and to be happy in your own souls: and “if you do these things, you shall never fall, but shall have an entrance ministered unto you abundantly into the kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ [Note: 2 Peter 1:10-11.].”]


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Bibliography
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/philippians-4.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Philippians 4:9. καὶ) Those things which also [But Engl. Vers. “which ye have both learned and,” etc.] καὶ, also, connects this verse with the following words, not with the preceding words. He makes a transition from what is general ( ὅσα, whatsoever) to what regards Paul. There would have been place for the καὶ, and, before , which [i.e. but for the Asyndeton], the word καὶ, also, still remaining [i.e. in order to connect this ver. with what follows bearing on Paul in particular].— ἠκούσατε, ye have heard) although you have not yet sufficiently ( παρελάβετε) received them.— εἴδετε, ye have seen) although ye have not as yet sufficiently learned them ( ἐμάθετε).—(54) θεὸς τῆς εἰρήνης, the God of peace) not only the peace of God, Philippians 4:7, but God Himself.


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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/philippians-4.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Those things, which ye have both learned; he recommends to their serious practice not new things, but those weighty matters which they had before learned of him when preaching amongst them.

And received, and heard; yea, and approved as worthy to be kept.

And seen in me; and that all things might be more lively and affecting, with an increase of words, he moves with this, that his doctrine was exemplified by his own practice when amongst them, (as he had hinted before, Philippians 3:17), expressing the same thing by his life which he did by his word, 1 Timothy 4:12 1 Peter 5:3.

Do; whereupon he would have them to be doers also of the same things, 1 Thessalonians 1:6 2:13 Hebrews 13:7 James 1:22.

And the God of peace shall be with you; and in this practice you have comfort from the presence of the God of peace, (as above, Philippians 4:7), who will embrace and prosper you, being reconciled to you in Christ, and at peace with you: so Romans 15:5,33 16:20 2 Corinthians 13:11 1 Thessalonians 5:23.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/philippians-4.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

9. ἃ καὶ ἐμάθετεἐν ἐμοί. On the apparent egotism, see above on Philippians 3:17.—The aorists refer to the past days at Philippi.

παρελάβετε. In the sense of receiving a truth passed on by a teacher, who on his part παραδίδωσιν. See e.g. 1 Corinthians 11:23, ἐγὼ παρέλαβον ἀπὸ τοῦ κυρίου ὃ καὶ παρέδωκα ὑμῖν. Cp. Galatians 1:9, εἴ τις ὑμᾶς εὐαγγελίζεται παρʼ ὃ παρέλαβετε, ἀνάθεμα ἔστω: and 1 Thessalonians 4:1. Παραλαμβάνειν thus comes very nearly to mean “to learn” and παραδιδόναι (παράδοσις) “to teach.”

ἐν ἐμοί. Strictly, the words attach themselves to εἴδετε only. It is as if he had written ἅ ἐμάθετε κτλ. παρʼ ἐμοῦ καὶ εἴδ. ἐν ἐμοί.

πράσσετε. “Practise.” “Roughly speaking, ποιεῖν may be said to … designate performance, πράσσειν intentional … habitual performance; π. to point to an actual result, πρ. to the scope and character of the result” (Grimm, ed. Thayer, s.v. ποιεῖν).

καὶ. See above on the καὶ which introduces Philippians 4:7.

ὁ θεὸς τῆς εἰρήνης. Author and Giver of “The peace of God.” The phrase occurs Romans 15:33; Romans 16:20, ὁ θ. τῆς εἰρ. συντρίψει τὸν σατανᾶν: 2 Corinthians 13:11, ὁ θ. τῆς ἀγάπης καὶ τῆς εἰρ. ἔσται μεθʼ ὑμῶν: 1 Thessalonians 5:23, αὐτὸς ὁ θ. τῆς εἰρ. ἁγιάσαι ὑμᾶς κτλ.: Hebrews 13:20, ὁ δὲ θ. τῆς εἰρ., ὁ ἀναγαγὼν κτλ. And cp. 2 Thessalonians 3:16, ὁ κύριος τῆς εἰρ.: and 1 Corinthians 14:33, οὐ γὰρ ἀκαταστασίας ὁ θ. ἀλλὰ εἰρήνης. In the last case the peace is plainly social peace rather than internal, personal peace. But the two are closely connected; the peace of God in the individual tends always to the peace of the society, for it means the banishment of the self-spirit. Here very possibly St Paul has in side-view the Philippians’ need of peace in their community, and of a higher tone of Christian thought and feeling as an aid towards it. But the whole context is so full of the inward aspects of Christian experience that it seems best to take this phrase as referring primarily to the sabbath of the soul, the peace of God in the man.


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"Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/philippians-4.html. 1896.

John Eadie's Commentary on Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians and Philippians

(Philippians 4:9.) ῝α καὶ ἐμάθετε, καὶ παρελάβετε, καὶ ἠκούσατε, καὶ εἴδετε ἐν ἐμοί, ταῦτα πράσσετε—“which things also ye learned and received, and heard and saw in me, these things do.” Bengel says, with his usual point-facit transitionem a generalibus ad Paulina. By the pronoun the apostle refers to things just enumerated and enforced, and not to other things yet and now to be spoken of. He does not write ὅσα, but -giving precision and definiteness to his counsels. The first καί, as Meyer remarks, is simply “also,” the meaning being virtually “which things”-those of Philippians 4:8—“ye have also learned of me.” The sentences, at the same time, are so far distinct as the concluding verbs of each indicate. The four verbs are simply connected by καί, and the meaning is not- which ye have as well learned as received, as in the recent version of Ewald-was ihr wie lerntet so annahmet wie hörtet so sahet an mir. The four verbs are to be distinguished, for they are neither synonymous nor is the clause tautological. The first, ἐμάθετε, refers to instruction. Romans 16:17; Colossians 1:7. The next term, παρελάβετε, denotes the result of instruction, the appropriation of the knowledge conveyed, or the fact that they had assented to it or had embraced it. 1 Corinthians 15:1; Galatians 1:12; 1 Thessalonians 2:13. They had been instructed, and they had accepted the instruction, and therefore were they bound to abide by it. It is unwarranted in Grotius to find in ἐμάθετε the sense of prima institutio, and in παρελάβετε that of exactior doctrina. Hoelemann as groundlessly refers the first verb to the genus, and the others to the species, though he admits that the structure of the verse does not favour his view. Rilliet, too, makes this distinction-son enseignement direct, μανθάνω les instructions qu'il leur a transmises sous une forme quelconque- παραλαμβάνω. But more precisely-

καὶ ἠκούσατε καὶ εἴδετε ἐν ἐμοί—“and heard and saw in me.” The phrase ἐν ἐμοί is connected with both verbs. The apostle has referred to his public instructions, and now he concludes with his personal example. What they heard in connection with him is the report about him circulating in the church-the character which was usually given him. Chap. Philippians 3:17. Calvin and some others suppose the “hearing” to refer to Paul's oral instructions in Philippi-les recits, as Rilliet writes; but after the two preceding verbs this would be a needless repetition. Nor does it vaguely signify de me absente, as Hoelemann gives it. “And saw in me”-what they had witnessed in his conduct and character. His appeal is as in 1 Thessalonians 2:9-12. The two first verbs seem to refer to his official conduct, and the two last to his private demeanour. In connecting ἐν ἐμοί with ἠκούσατε as well as εἴδετε, it is needless to resort to the supposition of a zeugma. Nor is there any use in supposing, with Rilliet and van Hengel, that ἐν ἐμοί belongs equally and formally to all the four verbs. And the charge is-

ταῦτα πράσσετε—“these things practise.” It is not simply now- λογίζεσθε. Chrysostom says- μὴ λέγετε μόνον, ἀλλὰ καὶ πράττετε, but no contrast of this nature is intended, for the one term includes the other. Meyer supposes that there is a kind of formal parallelism-that both verbs really belong to both verses. Romans 10:10. Perhaps this is too refined. The apostle first enumerates the things possessed of certain specified qualities, and bids his readers think on them, for a mindless obedience would be accidental, and therefore worthless. But then he connects the previous general statement with his personal instructions, and their received tuition; nay, embodies it in his own character, and therefore he boldly bids them reproduce his lessons and example in their own experience and life. The four verbs are a species of climax: - ἐμάθετε, παρελάβετε, ἠκούσατε, εἴδετε—“ye learned,” more general; “ye took up,” more pointed; “ye heard,” more personal; “ye saw in me,” decided and definite. It is not simply Paul the teacher, but Paul the man, how he was reported of, nay, how he demeaned himself. It is not, do as I taught you, but also do as ye heard of me doing and saw me doing, in reference to all the elements of virtue and praise. And then-

καὶ ὁ θεὸς τῆς εἰρήνης ἔσται μεθ᾿ ὑμῶν—“and then,” or “and so the God of peace shall be with you.” The meaning of και is as in the beginning of Philippians 4:7. The phrase God of peace is parallel to the preceding one-peace of God. In the former case the peace is described in its connection with God, and now God is pointed out as the inworker of this peace. It characterizes Him, and in this aspect belongs to what Scheuerlein calls die dominirenden Eigenschaften, p. 115. The phrase “God of peace” must not be weakened into Deus benignissimus. The words μεθ᾿ ὑμῶν resemble a common expression in the Old Testament- ִעמָּכֶם . To specify any single purpose which the presence of the God of peace with them should accomplish is useless and restricted, for He will work out every purpose- συνεργὸς τῶν ὅλων. The presence and operations of the God of peace are like the peace of God -they pass all understanding. And this sounds like the apostle's farewell-a pledge of peace to those who were aiming at the high Christian excellence described in the two previous verses, in whom the faith of the gospel had wrought a change which might ripen at length into the perfection of ethical symmetry and beauty.


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Bibliography
Eadie, John. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". John Eadie's Commentary on Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians and Colossians. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jec/philippians-4.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘The things which you both learned and received and heard and saw in me, these things do, and the God of peace will be with you.’

Paul then makes a practical application by pointing them to what he and others have taught them and to his own example, something only possible because he knows that his whole life is aimed only at pleasing God. We may perhaps analyse I as follows:

· ‘The things which you have learned.’ This has in mind what Paul had taught them, and what others of Paul’s retinue have taught them since.

· ‘The things which you have received.’ ‘Received’ was a technical term for receiving sacred tradition that had been handed on. Thus the idea here is of the traditions about Jesus conveyed by Apostolic teaching (and now recorded in the Gospels).

· ‘The things which you have heard.’ This would appear to have in mind what they had heard about the lives of Paul and others who had been called by God to the work of the Gospel, and especially what they had learned about Paul from his fellow-workers (and possibly from copies of his letters which had been passed around the churches).

· ‘The things which you have seen in me.’ That is, the things described in chapter 3, something of which they would have seen when he was among them.

So what they must do is ‘the things that they have learned and ‘received’ from him and others’, based on the Scriptures and the life and teaching of Jesus (what has been ‘received and handed on’ has in mind the Apostolic teaching concerning Jesus, now found in the Gospels), and what they have heard about him, and seen in him as he has carried such things into practical living. He wants them to imitate him as he imitates Christ (1 Corinthians 11:1). Then, he assures them, the God of peace will be with them.


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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/philippians-4.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9. Those things—Rather, which things, namely, those just enumerated.

Learned—From his personal teaching.

Received—Accepting the instruction.

Heard—From others as to his character and life.

Seen—In his personal conduct. These they were to do. Such is the apostle’s own expansion of his counsel, in Philippians 3:17, to an imitation of himself.

The God of peace—The result of this course is the same as at Philippians 4:7. There it is the peace which God works; here, the God who in-works the peace. Not content with giving the grace, he comes himself.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/philippians-4.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Wholesome conduct ( Philippians 4:9) should follow wholesome thinking ( Philippians 4:8).

Paul organized his thoughts on this subject by constructing two pairs. The Philippians had learned and received many helpful lessons from Paul, their teacher. They had personally heard his verbal instructions and seen his individual example. They needed to put these things into practice, not just think about them and discuss them.

"It appears that he [Paul] was of the conviction that the truths of the Christian gospel must never be abstracted from action and put into high-toned words and phrases, but always expressed in the life of the teacher." [Note: Hawthorne, p190.]

"The preacher is the interpreter of the spiritual life and should be an example of it." [Note: Robertson, 4:460.]

When the Philippians put these truths into practice, the God of peace would be with them. Obviously God is always with His people ( Matthew 28:20). Paul"s phrase is a way of saying that they would experience God"s presence by enjoying the peace that comes when we walk in fellowship with God. This was undoubtedly a play on words in view of Philippians 4:7. Both the peace of God and the God of peace guard the believer who is a partner in the work of the gospel.

In this section of collected exhortations ( Philippians 4:4-9) Paul urged five things. These are rejoicing in Christ always, being forbearing with all people, praying about difficult situations, thinking about wholesome subjects, and practicing apostolic teaching. These are fundamental revelations of God"s will for all Christians that are especially relevant to our calling to proclaim the gospel.

The exhortation in Philippians 4:8-9 also concludes the main body of the epistle begun in Philippians 1:27. The reference to Paul"s conduct in Philippians 4:9 ties back to Philippians 1:12-26.

"The body of the letter begins with a topic sentence in Philippians 1:27 a. The Philippian Christians, to be perfected in their partnership for the gospel, were to conduct themselves worthy of the gospel. Specifically two things are in view-unity with one another and steadfastness against their opponents. They need not fear, for God will supply grace ( Philippians 1:27-30). Chapter2takes up the unity motif, and chapter3 , steadfastness. The main body of the epistle then concludes with a hortatory paragraph which again addresses the same two subjects. All this is freed from any topical "loose ends" by the summarizing double conclusion of Philippians 4:8-9." [Note: Swift, p249.]


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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/philippians-4.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Philippians 4:9. The things which ye both learned, and received, and heard, and saw in me, these things do. Knowing how much more telling example often is than precept, the apostle points to his own teaching and life as they had known them. At first they had been scholars learning from him; after that, they became fellow workers and brethren, and were entrusted with a share of the duties of the church, and as he had received from the Lord, so they had received from him; beside which they were daily witnesses of his words and works, and to these he refers them as their practical standard.

and the God of peace shall be with you. This he says speaking out of the depths of his own experience. He knows that his own pursuit of the high standard which he is setting before the Philippians has brought him peace, even amid the greatest afflictions, through the indwelling presence of God. And his constant feeling of joy in the Lord, even in his present chains, is a telling evidence that the God of peace is with him.


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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/philippians-4.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Philippians 4:9. It is hardly possible, with Ell(41)., to refer καὶ κ. τ. λ. immediately to the preceding, without forcing the construction.— ἐμάθ. κ. παρελ. plainly refer to the definite Christian teaching he had set himself to give them. παραλαμβάνω is used regularly of “receiving” truth from a teacher.— ἠκ. κ. εἴδ. ἐν . This is the impression made upon them by his Christian character, apart from any conscious effort on his part. Cf. chap. Philippians 3:17.— θ. τ. εἰρ. See on Philippians 4:8 (ad init.). It is quite possible that he has partly in view the disregard of these ethical qualities as threatening the harmony of the Church, and as, so far, to blame for the divisions already existing.


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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/philippians-4.html. 1897-1910.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Philippians 4:9 “The things which ye both learned and received and heard and saw in me, these things do: and the God of peace shall be with you”

“The things which ye both learned and received and heard and saw in me”: “All that you learnt and received and heard and saw in me put into practice” (TCNT). Again, Paul sets up himself as an example to be followed (1 Corinthians 11:1). “These things do”: Right thoughts must result in right actions if they are to be worth anything. The present tense here is used, that is, keep on doing. “Practice as a habit” (Robertson p. 460). “Right thinking is invaluable, but it must also be accompanied by resolution; it must be followed by determined action” (Erdman p. 143). Paul himself practiced these very truths. “The truths of the Christian gospel must never be abstracted from action and put into high-toned words and phrases, but always expressed in the life of the teacher” (Hawthorne p. 190) (1 Timothy 4:12-16).

“And the God of peace shall be with you”: “To think of God as ‘the God of peace’ was a most refreshing and encouraging exercise for Paul who lived constantly in the center of turmoil and trouble (2 Corinthians 11:23-33)” (Hawthorne p. 190). Fellowship with God is conditional. We must "do" these things (Matthew 7:21-27).

There is one final thing I wish to point out in this section of Scripture. Paul gave the Philippians the right concepts or truths. The instruction was very practical and possible for all, but there was a time to stop discussing these things and to start doing them. All Bible study is vain, if it doesn"t result in changed conduct. Most Christians do not need another class on how to go about teaching others, or treating their mates or brethren with honor and so on. They simply need to finally accept what they already know is true and then do it.


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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/philippians-4.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

have. Omit,

seen = saw. App-133.,


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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/philippians-4.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and seen in me, do: and the God of peace shall be with you.

Both - rather, 'the things also which ye have learned,' etc.; the things which, besides being recommended in words, have been also recommended by my example, carry into practice. Heard, and seen. These two refer to Paul's example, as "learned" and "received" (accepted), to his teaching.

And - `and then,' as the result (Philippians 4:7). Not only 'the peace of God,' but "the God of peace" Himself, "shall be with you."


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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/philippians-4.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) Ye have both learned, and received.—The reference is here to St. Paul’s teaching, which he “delivered” to them (see 1 Corinthians 15:1-3; Galatians 1:12) as a message, “received” by revelation of God, and which they “received” accordingly.

Heard, and seen in me.—Here the reference is to his example, as subsidiary to his teaching and confirmatory of its truth.

The God of peace.—The inversion (compared with Philippians 4:7) is striking. To have the “peace of God” with us is much; to have “the God of Peace” Himself with us is more. With this promise the Letter itself ends. What follows is but postscript.


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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/philippians-4.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and seen in me, do: and the God of peace shall be with you.
which
3:17; 1 Corinthians 10:31-33; 11:1; 1 Thessalonians 1:6; 2:2-12,14; 4:1-8; 2 Thessalonians 3:6-10
do
Deuteronomy 5:1; Matthew 5:19,20; 7:21,24-27; Luke 6:46; 8:21; John 2:5; 13:17; 15:14; Acts 9:6; 2 Thessalonians 3:4; James 1:22; 2 Peter 1:10; 1 John 3:22
the God
7; Romans 15:33; 16:20; 1 Corinthians 14:33; 2 Corinthians 5:19,20; 13:11; 1 Thessalonians 5:23; Hebrews 13:20,21
with
Isaiah 8:10; 41:10; Matthew 1:23; 28:20; 2 Timothy 4:22

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/philippians-4.html.

The Bible Study New Testament

Put into practice. Paul is saying for them to imitate the complete example which he set for them by following Christ! Compare Philippians 3:17 and note. And the God. Faith becomes perfect through action (James 2:22). As you reach out through faith, both God's peace and the God who gives us peace will be yours!!!


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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Philippians 4:9". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/philippians-4.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

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