Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 20:30

Stripes that wound scour away evil, And strokes reach the innermost parts.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Belly;   Disease;   Punishment;   Wounds;   The Topic Concordance - Chastisement;   Cleanness;   Evil;  
Dictionaries:
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Pardon;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Proverbs, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Inwards, Inward Parts;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Living (2);   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Scourge;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Belly;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Cleanse;   Color;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The blueness of a wound - חברות chabburoth, from חבר chabar, to unite, to join together. Does it not refer to the cicatrice of a wound when, in its healing, the two lips are brought topether? By this union the wound is healed; and by the previous discharge the lace-rated ends of fibres and blood-vessels are purged away. So stripes, though they hurt for the time, become the means of correcting and discharging the moral evil of the inmost soul, the vice of the heart, the easily-besetting sin.

In this chapter, verses fourteen to nineteen, inclusive, are wanting in the Septuagint and Arabic; and the tenth, eleventh, twelfth, and thirteenth, come in after the twenty-second. It is difficult to account for these variations, unless they were occasioned by the change of leaves in MSS.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-20.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Better, The blueness of a wound is a cleansing of evil, so are the stripes that go down to the inward parts of the belly.

The open sores of wounds left by the scourge, unclean and foul as they seem, are yet a cleansing, purifying process for evil; so also are the stripes that reach the inward parts of the belly, i. e., the sharp reproofs, the stings of conscience, which penetrate where no scourge can reach, into the inner life of man. Chastisement, whatever be its nature, must be real; the scourge must leave its mark, the reproof must go deep.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-20.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"Stripes that wound cleanse away evil; And strokes reach the innermost parts."

"Sharp blows purify the wicked; and stripes the innermost being."[36] The unmerciful use of corporal punishment in ancient times is emphasized by the terrible beatings and scourgings suffered by the apostle Paul (2 Corinthians 11:23-26). Such public scourgings were inflicted upon criminals during colonial times in America; and public reaction against such punishments has led to a near-abandonment of the very principle of punishment as something deserved by the guilty, and absolutely required for the well-being of society.

No society should reject the punishment of criminals as a cardinal principle of public safety, especially to the extent that it has been rejected in America today. It is still true that the fear of punishment, justly and promptly inflicted upon the guilty, is the greatest single deterrent to wickedness that the world has ever known. This proverb endorses it, and in effect, commands it, regardless of the actual nature of the punishment.

It is an absolute must that any punishment of convicted criminals should be something utterly distasteful to the criminal. Incarceration in one of our modern air-conditioned jails, where no work is required, where a color TV set is provided, and a good bed at night, three square meals a day served free of charge to the occupants, medical treatments, dental work, and medicines, etc., all at taxpayers' expense - all of this actually provides a safer and better living for convicted criminals than that which many honest and hard-working citizens are able to provide even for themselves, despite the fact that their taxes pay for all those benefits for the convicts. To call such behavior on the part of any society stupid is an unjustified compliment! It is criminal!

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-20.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The blueness of a wound cleanseth away evil,.... Rubs it off and scours it away, as the wordF13תמריק "abstesio", Piscator, Mercerus, Cocceius; "detersio", Montanus, Michaelis; "effricatio", Schultens. signifies, or is a clearing and rubbing it off; some men must be beaten black and blue, or must have very sore correction, before they can be reclaimed and reformed from their evil ways; so some interpret it of the evil manF14ברע "in malo, sub, homine", Vatablus, Mercerus, Gejerus, Michaelis; "in malo (homine nequam)", Schultens, so Aben Ezra. : sanctified afflictions to God's people are the means of purging away their iniquities, their dross, and their sin; but there is nothing so effectually cleanses from sin as the blood of Jesus, or heals or cures of it as his blue wounds and stripes; see Isaiah 27:9;

so do stripes the inward part of the belly; or heart and conscience; by means of corrections and chastisement men are brought to an inward sense of sin; they are shown their transgressions wherein they have exceeded, and are commanded to return from iniquity, Job 36:9; they lament and mourn over sin, confess it and forsake it; and then may the inwards of the heart, the mind and conscience, defiled with them, be said to be cleansed from them; especially when led by these stripes and corrections to the stripes, wounds, and blood of Christ which, being applied, cleanse from all, sin inwardly and outwardly.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-20.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

k The blueness of a wound cleanseth away evil: so [do] stripes the inward parts of the belly.

(k) Sharp punishment that pierces even the inward parts is profitable for the wicked to bring them to amendment.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/proverbs-20.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

blueness — literally, “joining,” the process of uniting the edges of a wound throws off purulent matter.

stripes  …  belly — So punishment provides healing of soul (Proverbs 18:8), by deterring from evil courses.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-20.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

30 Cutting wounds cleanse away evil,

And reach the inner parts of the body.

The two words for wounds in line first stand in the st. constr .; חבּוּרה (from חבר, to be bound around with stripes, to be striped) is properly the streak, the stripe; but is here heightened by פּצע (from פּצע, to cleave, split, tear open), beyond the idea of the stripe-wound: tearing open the flesh, cuts tearing into the flesh. The pred. is after the Kerı̂ תּמרוּק ; but this substantive, found in the Book of Esther, where it signifies the purification of the women for the harem (according to which, e.g., Ahron B. Joseph explains כמו תמרוק לנשׁים שׁהוא יפה להם ), is syntactically hard, and scarcely original. For if we explain with Kimchi: wounds of deep incision find their cleansing (cure) by evil, i.e., by means which bring suffering (according to which, probably the Venet . μώλωπες τραύματος λάμψουσιν ἐν κακῷ ), then תמרוקן, with the pronoun pointing back, one would have expected. But the interpretation of בּרע, of severe means of cure, is constrained; that which lies nearest, however, is to understand רע of evil. But if, with this understanding of the word, we translate: Vibices plagarum sunt lustratio quae adhibetur malo (Fleischer), one does not see why בּרע, and not rather gen. רע, is used. But if we read after the Chethı̂b תּמריק, then all is syntactically correct; for (1.) that the word ימריקוּ, or תּמרקנה, is not used, is in accordance with a well-known rule, Gesen. §146. 3; and (2.) that המריק is connected, not directly with an accus. obj., but with ב, has its analogy in התעה ב, Jeremiah 42:2, השׁרישׁ בּ, Job 31:12, and the like, and besides has its special ground in the metaphorical character of the cleansing. Thus, e.g., one uses Syr. 't'aa' of external misleading; but with Syr. k of moral misleading (Ewald, §217, 2); and Arab. ' _ of erecting a building; but with Arab. b of the intellectual erection of a memorial (monument). It is the so-called Bâ̇âlmojâz ; vid ., de Sacy's Chrest Arab . i. 397. The verb מרק means in Talm. also, “to take away” (a metaph. of abstergere ; cf. Arab. marak, to wipe off)

(Note: Vid ., Dozy's Lettre à M. Fleischer (1871), p. 198.)

and that meaning is adopted, Schabbath 33a, for the interpretations of this proverb: stripes and wounds a preparedness for evil carries away, and sorrow in the innermost part of the body, which is explained by דרוקן (a disease appearing in diverse forms; cf. “ Drachenschuss,”; as the name of an animal disease); but granting that the biblical מרק may bear this meaning, the ב remains unaccountable; for we say מרק עצמו לעברה, for to prepare oneself for a transgression (sin of excess), and not בעברה . We have thus to abide by the primary meaning, and to compare the proverb, Berachoth 5a: “afflictive providences wash away all the transgressions of a man.” But the proverb before us means, first at least, not the wounds which God inflicts, but those which human educational energy inflicts: deep-cutting wounds, i.e., stern discipline, leads to the rubbing off of evil, i.e., rubs it, washes it, cleanses it away. It may now be possible that in 30b the subject idea is permutatively continued: et verbera penetralium corporis (thus the Venet .: πληγαὶ τῶν ταμιείων τοῦ γαρστρός ), i.e., quorum vis ad intimos corporis et animi recessus penetrat (Fleischer). But that is encumbered, and חדרי־בטן (cf. Proverbs 20:27, Proverbs 18:8), as referring to the depths to which stern corporal discipline penetrates, has not its full force. וּמכּות is either a particip.: and that is touching ( ferientes ) the inner chambers of the body, or חדרי־בטן is with the ב, or immediately the second object of תמריק to be supplied: and strokes (rub off, cleanse, make pure) the innermost part. Jerome and the Targ. also supply ב, but erroneously, as designating place: in secretioribus ventris , relatively better the lxx and Syr.: εἰς ταμιεῖα κοιλίας . Luther hits the sense at least, for he translates:

One must restrain evil with severe punishment,

And with hard strokes which one feels.

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The Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.
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Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-20.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Note, 1. Many need severe rebukes. Some children are so obstinate that their parents can do no good with them without sharp correction; some criminals must feel the rigour of the law and public justice; gentle methods will not work upon them; they must be beaten black and blue. And the wise God sees that his own children sometimes need very sharp afflictions. 2. Severe rebukes sometimes do a great deal of good, as corrosives contribute to the cure of a wound, eating out the proud flesh. The rod drives out even that foolishness which was bound up in the heart, and cleanses away the evil there. 3. Frequently those that most need severe rebukes can worse bear them. Such is the corruption of nature that men are as loth to be rebuked sharply for their sins as to be beaten till their bones ache. Correction is grievous to him that forsakes the way, and yet it is good for him, Hebrews 12:11.

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Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-20.html. 1706.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

CRITICAL NOTES.—

Pro . The blueness of a wound. Cutting wounds (Delitzsch), Wounding stripes (Zckler). Miller translates the "welts" (i.e., the tumid and purple confines of a wound), cleanse as though an evil, "that is, although painful and deformed, they have a clear office, viz., to purge away the sore." Wardlaw suggests that the word, being etymologically derived from a verb denoting to join together, may be translated compressions, and says, "The compressions of a wound are necessary for cleansing out of it the prurient and peccant humour, which would prevent its healing; they are, at the same time, in many cases exceedingly painful, and would only be endured or inflicted from necessity. And as they thus clean the wound and promote its healing, so in a moral sense does the severity of discipline affect with salutary and cleansing influence the condition of the inner man."

MAIN HOMILETICS OF Pro

PAIN AS A PREVENTIVE OF PAIN

For the different renderings of this verse, see the Critical Notes. However we translate it the thoughts suggested are the same, viz:—

I. That pain in the present may prevent greater pain in the future. When the surgeon is called in to examine a wounded man, the examination of the wound may give him more pain than he would have suffered if he had been let alone; it may bring far more present suffering to extract the ball, or to insert the probe, than it would have done simply to bandage the wound. But the pain of to-day is to ensure days of healthful rest by and by; if the present suffering was not inflicted, months and years of pain in the future might be the result. The pain of mind or body inflicted upon a child of five or ten years old, is intended by its parent to prevent greater moral or physical pain when he is fifty or seventy. There is no human creature who can afford to do without the pruning-knife at some period of its life; and if the pruning is not administered, the penalty will be paid either in this world or the next. The wise and loving parent gives pain in youth to prevent pain to his child in manhood, and the All-wise and Loving Father, God, subjects His children to pain in the present life to prevent a deeper and more lasting pain in the life to come. He pricks the conscience by His word to bring men to repentance, and so to salvation from the "wrath to come," and He sees even in His own children so much "evil" remaining that He is compelled to visit "their transgressions with the rod, and their iniquity with stripes" (Psa ), in order to "cleanse" their characters.

II. Pain of body may be beneficial to the human spirit. This is a subject to which our attention has been before directed. See on chap. Pro, page 334, and on chap. Pro 17:10, page 510.

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/proverbs-20.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The blueness of a wound cleanseth away evil: so do stripes the inward parts of the belly.

The blueness — Grievous wounds, which make men black and blue; or severe punishments.

Cleanseth — Are the means to reclaim a wicked man, and to purge out his corruption.

The belly — Of the heart. Grievous wounds or stripes cleanse not only the outward man by keeping it from evil actions, but even the inward man, by expelling or subduing vile affections: which is a great and blessed benefit of afflictions.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/proverbs-20.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 20:30 The blueness of a wound cleanseth away evil: so [do] stripes the inward parts of the belly.

Ver. 30. The blueness of the wound cleanseth.] Some must be beaten black and blue ere they will be better; neither is wit anything worth with them till they have paid well for it. - The Jews were ever best when in worst condition. The Athenians, Non nisi atrati, would never mend till they were in mourning. And,

Anglica gens est optima flens, et pessima ridens.

As a great statesman said of his nation, Physicians commonly cure a lethargy by a fever. Surgeons let their patients bleed sometimes, etiam ad deliquium animae. The scorpion heals his own wounds; and the viper being beaten and applied cures his own biting. Surely as the scourging of the garment with a stick beats out the moths and the dust, so do corrections corruptions from the heart; and as lancing lets out filth, so doth affliction sin.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-20.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS.

I hope that the Reader is perpetually gathering sweet instructions from this part of the word of God; and in nothing more so, than in the discovery of his own incompetency to enter far into the apprehension of divine things. Among the improvements of grace this is eminent, to learn, the further we go, the more of our ignorance. If at any time we do not find the sweet savour in the reading of the scriptures as heretofore, the consciousness of past enjoyments ought to become the excitement to future expectations.

If we have known the name of Christ to have been precious the sweet savour of his name ought to leave a fragrancy now; like some rich perfume, which though the thing itself be taken away, the effects remain. And though we see Christ not, yet former experiences should quicken present desires. Man's goings (Solomon saith in this chapter) are of the Lord. Am I waiting for some renewed visit from Christ? Am I longing for his return, expecting him, on the lookout for him? Is not this very frame the state in which Jesus prepares his people for the renewals of his love? Nay, is there not in this very desire and expectation of his coming even a present enjoyment in that desire and expectation? Surely all these worketh that one and the self same spirit, dividing to every man severally as he will. Blessed Lord! grant me a sweet savour of past enjoyments, in the absence of present communion; and when I have no immediate view of thy glory, and the sweet communications of thy love; still let my prayer, awakened by thy grace, be the prayer of the church; draw me and we will run after thee until thou shalt bring me into thy chambers.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/proverbs-20.html. 1828.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 30. The blueness of a wound cleanseth away evil, literally, "Wounding stripes purge away evil"; so do stripes the inward parts of the belly, for a proper measure of severe discipline penetrates to the depths of the heart and removes the desire for evil, all punishment, rightly administered, having this object.

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Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-20.html. 1921-23.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 20:30. The blueness of a wound This is a very obscure passage. I think, says Dr. Grey, Le Clerc's interpretation the best I have met with; that a wicked man, who has received due correction for his crimes, will be cured of them, or will not so easily fall into the like again; and that though stripes chiefly affect the body, yet they have likewise an effect on (the chambers of the belly) the inward recesses of the mind; restraining the offender by the fear of punishment. That this is the meaning of the Hebrew words בטן חדרי chadrei baten, rendered The chambers of the belly, appears from that elegant comparison of the conscience, or spirit of a man, Proverbs 20:27 to a light within him, searching out and discovering his most secret thoughts.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-20.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The blueness of a wound, grievous wounds, which make men black and blue, or severe punishments,

cleanseth away evil; are the most effectual means to reclaim a wicked man, and to purge out his corruption.

So do stripes, Heb. and stripes, which answer to the wounds in the former clause,

the inward parts of the belly; either,

1. Which pierce even to the inward parts of the belly; and so we are to understand out of the former branch, cleanse away evil. Or,

2. They cleanse the inward parts of the belly, i.e. of the heart. So this is an addition to the former clause, and the sense of the whole is, Grievous wounds or stripes do cleanse not only the outward man, by keeping it from evil actions, but even the inward man, by expelling or subduing vile affections; which is mentioned as a great and blessed benefit of afflictions.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-20.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

30.The blueness of a wound — Meaning, that punishment or correction, even to such degree as to produce”blueness,” or marks, is likely to produce reformation. It is generally agreed that the first part of this verse refers to stripes caused by punishment. Some, as Stuart, interpret it of such strokes going down deep into the body. It is very evident that these old saints had no qualms of conscience about corporal punishment.

Stripes’ inward parts , (hhadhre baten,) chambers of the body, is used in other places by metonymy for the “inner man,” the soul, the spirit, the mind. So, possibly, the term is used here; and if so, would imply that corporal punishment alone was not an effectual remedy, but inward smitings — those of the conscience and soul — penitence, heart-wounds, and aches, which, under the divine blessing and influence, would lead to a new and better life. For last clause, compare Proverbs 20:27. Miller insists on this rendering: “The welts of a wound cleanse, though as an evil; so do stripes the very chambers of the belly.” The welts — the tumid and purple confines of a wound — are an evil; that is, painful, etc.; but they purge away the sore: so stripes cleanse the inward parts, etc. The Septuagint reads this verse thus: “Bruises and contusions befall bad men; and plagues shall come into the inward parts of their belly.”

 

 

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-20.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

". . . moral evil must be put away by severe chastisement." [Note: Toy, p397.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/proverbs-20.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Proverbs 20:30. The blueness of a wound cleanseth away evil — Grievous wounds which make men black and blue, or severe punishments, are the means which are frequently most effectual to reclaim a wicked man, and to purge out his corruptions; so do stripes — Hebrew, ומכות, and stripes, which answer to wounds in the former clause; the inward parts of the belly Hebrew, חדרי בשׂן, literally, the chambers of the belly, that is, the inward recesses of the mind. The sense of the whole is, Grievous wounds, or stripes, cleanse not only the outward man, by keeping it from evil actions, but even the inward man, by expelling or subduing vile affections; which is a great and blessed benefit of afflictions.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/proverbs-20.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Evils. The wicked shall derive benefit from correction. --- Belly. They shall feel the remorse of conscience, as Chaldean seems to indicate. (Calmet) --- A serious illness often causes people to repent. (Menochius)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-20.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

cleanseth away = is cleansing. Supply the Ellipsis (App-6), "[though it be] an evil".

evil. Hebrew. ra"a". App-44.

belly. Supply the Ellipsis from preceding clause, "[though they be an evil]"

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-20.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The blueness of a wound cleanseth away evil: so do stripes the inward parts of the belly.

The blueness of a wound (severe chastisement, of which blueness of a wound is the sign) cleanseth away evil: so do stripes the inward parts of the belly. The "evil" lies deep in "the inward parts of the belly;" therefore "stripes" are needed, which are so severe as to produce livid marks of wounds (cf. Proverbs 27:6). To be "chastened of the Lord" saves one from being "condemned with the world" (1 Corinthians 11:32). Manasseh's Babylonian "fetters" were the instruments of saving him from the "everlasting chains" (Jude 1:6; 2 Chronicles 33:11-13). Pain is often the remedy of more fatal pains.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-20.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(30) The blueness of a wound.—Rather, the stripes of a wound, or wounds which cut into the flesh, cleanse away evil.

So do stripes the inward parts of the belly.—Better, and blows (which reach) the inward parts of the belly, i.e., which are felt in the inmost recesses of the heart (comp. Proverbs 20:27). Kindness is thrown away upon some people: they can only be touched by punishment.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-20.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The blueness of a wound cleanseth away evil: so do stripes the inward parts of the belly.
cleanseth away evil
Heb. is a purging medicine against evil. stripes.
19:25; 22:15; Isaiah 27:9; Hebrews 12:10 Reciprocal: Proverbs 20:27 - searching

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-20.html.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

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(1) многие нуждаются в суровых порицаниях. Некоторые дети настолько упрямы, что их родители не могут совладать с ними без строгих наказаний; некоторые преступники должны испытать суровость закона и гражданского правосудия, так как мягкие методы не воздействуют на них; их должны избить до бесчувствия. И мудрый Бог видит, что иногда Его собственные дети нуждаются в сильных страданиях.

(2) Суровые порицания иногда делают много хорошего, как разъедающее вещество, способствующее исцелению раны и разъедающее гордую плоть. Розга изгоняет глупость, привязавшуюся к сердцу, и очищает его от зла.

(3) часто тот, кто особенно нуждается в суровом наказании, не может вынести его. Такова порочная природа людей, что они неохотно выслушивают строгие порицания за свои грехи, как и принимают удары, пока их кости болят. Наказание приносит скорбь тому, кто оставил путь, но в то же время оно полезно для него (Евр.12:11).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary
>
>on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-20.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

Severe rebukes sometimes do a great deal of good. But such is the corruption of nature, that men are loth to be rebuked for their sins. If God uses severe afflictions, to purify our hearts and fit us for his service, we have cause to be very thankful.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 20:30". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary
>
>on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-20.html. 1706.