Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Proverbs 20:6

Many a man proclaims his own loyalty, But who can find a trustworthy man?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Depravity of Man;   Faithfulness;   Pride;   Profession;   Self-Righteousness;   Thompson Chain Reference - Self-Justification-Self-Condemnation;   Self-Righteousness;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Faithfulness;   Self-Righteousness;  
Dictionaries:
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Pardon;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Proverbs, Book of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Kindness;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Faith;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Most men will proclaim - Many men merciful ben clepid: a feithful man forsoth, who schal finde? Old MS. Bible.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/proverbs-20.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Goodness - With the special sense of bounty, beneficence. Contrast promise and performance. People boast of their liberality, yet we look in vain for the fulfillment of actual obligations.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/proverbs-20.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Proverbs 20:6

Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness; but a faithful man, who can find?

On goodness and fidelity

I. What are we to understand by “goodness” and a “faithful man”?--Goodness often means the Whole of a virtuous or religious temper. In Scripture it is sometimes limited to good affections, and the proper expression of them in our conduct. Goodness here is kindness; and a “faithful man” is one sincere and steady in goodness, who really feels benevolent affections, and is uniform and constant in the practical exercise of them.

1. He is “faithful in goodness,” whose general conduct is kind and beneficent. He is affable and courteous in his ordinary conversation, and never without necessity deliberately says that which may hurt or offend. He does not withhold his bounty till it is wrung from him by importunity. His friendly offices reach men’s spiritual necessities.

2. He is “faithful in goodness” whose goodness flows from an inward, a sincere, and a religious principle. Goodness sufficiently diffusive in its objects and exercises can only be the fruit of the Spirit of God.

3. The man “faithful in goodness” is steady, constant, and persevering in doing good. Important services to others often require much of diligence, self-denial, and disinterestedness. He does good, expecting nothing again.

II. What is suggested when it is said, “A faithful man, who can find”?

1. He reminds us that this is a character not to be found among unconverted sinners.

2. Faithfulness in goodness is uncommon.

3. Fidelity in goodness in a strict sense, and in full perfection, is not the character of the best saints on this side the grave.

III. Solomon’s maxim, that “most men will proclaim every one his own goodness.” Men are prone to disguise their true characters under a deceitful mask, and profess sentiments and affections to which their hearts are utter strangers. There are some who, in proclaiming their own goodness, cannot be charged with gross hypocrisy. They are self-deluded. Let every one press after the fidelity in goodness, to which every false display of it is opposed. (John Erskine, D. D.)

Self-applause and self-consistency

I. The commonness of self-applause. See it in nations; in churches. Pursue the subject more personally.

1. The profane. These say they mean well; their hearts are good; they are liberal, etc.

2. The Pharisees. What attempts they make to recommend themselves to others!

3. The orthodox. Those who pride themselves on their orthodoxy.

4. The godly. These are often guilty in a measure.

II. The rareness of self-consistency. A man faithful--

1. In his civil concerns.

2. In his friendly connections.

3. To his trusts.

4. To his convictions.

5. To his religious professions.

Enough has been said--

Subtle self-praise

Some, quite as vain, and as ambitious of commendation and praise, knowing that everything of the nature of ostentation is exceedingly unpopular, set about their object with greater art. They devise ways of getting their merits made known so as to avoid the flaw of ostentatious self-display. In company they commend others for the qualities which they conceive themselves specially to possess, or for the doing of deeds which they themselves are sufficiently well known to have done; and they turn the conversation dexterously that way; or they find fault with others for the want of the good they are desirous to get praise for; or they lament over their own deficiencies and failures in the very points in which they conceive their excellence to lie--to give others the opportunity of contradicting them; or, if they have done anything they deem particularly generous and praiseworthy, they introduce some similar case, and bring in, as apparently incidental, the situation of the person or the family that has been the object of their bounty. Somehow, they contrive to get in themselves and their goodness. (R. Wardlaw, D. D.)

A prevalent vice and a rare virtue

I. A prevalent vice. “Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness.” Self-conceit--men parading their imaginary merits. It is seen in the religious world, in the way in which certain men get their subscriptions trumpeted in reports, and their charitable doings emblazoned in journals. It is seen in the political world.

1. This vice is an obstruction to self-improvement. The man who prides himself on his own cleverness will never get knowledge; who exults in his own virtue will never advance in genuine goodness. Vanity is in one sense the fruit of ignorance.

2. This vice is socially offensive. Nothing is more offensive in society than vanity.

3. This vice is essentially opposed to Christianity. What says Paul? “For I say, through the grace given unto me, to every man that is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think; but to think soberly, according as God hath dealt to every man the measure of faith.” What says Christ? “Let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doeth.”

II. A rare virtue. “But a faithful man, who can find?” What is faithfulness? The man who in this verse is called faithful is in the next represented as just, “walking in his integrity.” Each of the three terms represents the same thing.

1. Practically true to our own convictions. Never acting without or against them.

2. Practically true to our own professions. Never breaking promises, swerving from engagements. Now this is a rare virtue. (D. Thomas, D. D.)

Self-laudation

It magnifies and multiplies matters. Loud was the lie which that bell told, hanging in a clock-house at Westminster, and usually rung at the coronation and funeral of princes, having this inscription about it:--

“King Edward made me,

Thirty thousand and three,

Take me down and weigh me,

And more you shall find me.”

But when this bell was taken down at the doom’s-day of abbeys, this and two more were found not to weigh twenty thousand. Many tales of fame are found to shrink accordingly. (W. Fuller.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Proverbs 20:6". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/proverbs-20.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"Most men will proclaim every one his own kindness; But a faithful man who can find?"

"Many a man protests his loyalty, but where will you find one to keep faith."[4] The thought here is similar to Paul's remark that, "There is none righteous, no not one" (Romans 3:9).

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/proverbs-20.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Most men will proclaim everyone his own goodness,.... As the Pharisee did, in Luke 18:11; and as the Pharisees in common did; who did all their works to be seen of men, and made clean the outside of the cup and platter; and were very careful to appear outwardly righteous to men, Matthew 23:5. And indeed this is the general cast of men; everyone is proclaiming his goodness to others, and would be thought to be good men; and cannot be easy with doing a good action, unless it is known, and particularly acts of beneficence and alms deeds; and are like the Pharisees, who, on such occasions, sounded a trumpet before them, Matthew 6:2. And the word may be rendered, "his mercy"F2חסדו "misericordiam suam", Pagninus, so some in Vatablus; "unius cujusque misericordiam", Mercerus, Gejerus. , or his kindness to the poor: the Targum renders it,

"many of the children of men are called merciful men;'

and so the Vulgate Latin version; and they like to be so called and accounted, whether they are so or not;

but a faithful man who can find? who answers to the character he gives of himself, or others upon his own representation give him; who is as good as his word, and, having promised assistance and relief, gives it; and who, having boasted that he has done a kindness to such an one and such an one, does the same likewise to another when applied to; or who sticks to his friend, and does not forsake him in his adversity, but supports and supplies him whom he knew in prosperity; it is hard and rare to find such a man; see Psalm 12:1. Or, though every man is talking of his good works, and boasting of his goodness, it is difficult to find an Israelite indeed, in whom the true grace of God is.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/proverbs-20.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Boasters are unreliable.

goodness — or, “kind disposition.”

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/proverbs-20.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

6 Almost every one meeteth a man who is gracious to him;

But a man who standeth the test, who findeth such a one?

As ציר אמונים, Proverbs 13:17, signifies a messenger in whom there is confidence, and עד אמונים, Proverbs 14:5, a witness who is altogether truthful, so אישׁ אמוּנים is a man who remains true to himself, and maintains fidelity toward others. Such an one it is not easy to find; but patrons who make promises and awaken expectations, finally to leave in the lurch him who depends on them - of such there are many. This contrast would proceed from 6a also, if we took קרא in the sense of to call, to call or cry out with ostentation: multi homines sunt quorum suam quisque humanitatem proclamat (Schelling, Fleischer, Ewald, Zöckler, and also, e.g., Meîri). But אישׁ חסדּו is certainly to be interpreted after Proverbs 11:17, Isaiah 57:1. Recognising this, Hitzig translates: many a man one names his dear friend; but in point of style this would be as unsuitable as possible. Must יקרא then mean vocat ? A more appropriate parallel word to מצא is קרא = קרה, according to which, with Oetinger, Heidenheim, Euchel, and Löwenstein, we explain: the greater part of men meet one who shows himself to them (to this or that man) as אישׁ חסד, a man well-affectioned and benevolent; but it is rare to find one who in his affection and its fruits proves himself to be true, and actually performs that which was hoped for from him. Luther translates, with the Syr. and Targ. after Jerome: Viel Menschen werden From gerhümbt [many men are reputed pious]; but if יקרא were equivalent to יקּרא, then אישׁ חסד ought to have been used instead of אישׁ חסדו . The lxx read רב אדם יקר אישׁ חסד, man is something great, and a compassionate man is something precious; but it costs trouble to find out a true man. The fundamental thought remains almost the same in all these interpretations and readings: love is plentiful; fidelity, rare; therefore חסד, of the right kind, after the image of God, is joined to אמת .

Copyright Statement
The Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.
Bibliographical Information
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/proverbs-20.html. 1854-1889.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Note, 1. It is easy to find those that will pretend to be kind and liberal. Many a man will call himself a man of mercy, will boast what good he has done and what good he designs to do, or, at least, what an affection he has to well-doing. Most men will talk a great deal of their charity, generosity, hospitality, and piety, will sound a trumpet to themselves, as the Pharisees, and what little goodness they have will proclaim it and make a mighty matter of it. 2. But it is hard to find those that really are kind and liberal, that have done and will do more than either they speak of or care to hear spoken of, that will be true friends in a strait; such a one as one may trust to is like a black swan.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/proverbs-20.html. 1706.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Proverbs 20:6 Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness: but a faithful man who can find?

Ver. 6. Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness.] As the kings of Egypt would needs be called Eυεργεται, bountiful, or benefactors, [Luke 22:25] many of the Popes Pii and Bonifacii &c. The Turks will needs be styled the only Mussulmans or true believers, as Papists the only Catholics. The Swenkfeldians - Stinkfeldians, Luther called them, from the ill savour of their opinions - intituled themselves with that glorious name, The confessors of the glory of Christ. (a) David George, that monstrous heretic, that was so far from accounting adulteries, fornications, incests, &c., for being any sins, that he did recommend them to his most perfect scholars, as acts of grace and mortification, &c.; yet he was wonderfully confident of the absolute truth of his tenets, and doubted not but that the whole world would soon submit to him and hold with him. He wrote to Charles the emperor, and the rest of the states of Germany, a humble and serious admonition, as he styled it, written by the command of the omnipotent God, diligently to be obeyed, because it contained those things whereupon eternal life did depend. (b)

But a faithful man who can find.] Diaconos paucitas honorabiles fecit, saith Jerome. The paucity of pious persons makes them precious. Perraro grati reperiuntur, saith Cicero. It is hard to find a thankful man. Faithful friends are in this age all for the most part gone in pilgrimage, and their return is uncertain, said the Duke of Buckingham to Bishop Morton in Richard III’s, time. (c)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/proverbs-20.html. 1865-1868.

The Popular Commentary by Paul E. Kretzmann

v. 6. Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness, literally, "Many a man meets a man of his pleasantness," for an outward show of pleasantness, an amiable exterior, is not unusual; but a faithful man, one upon whom one may depend in time of need, who can find? Such faithfulness is rare.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Kretzmann, Paul E. Ph. D., D. D. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "Kretzmann's Popular Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kpc/proverbs-20.html. 1921-23.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Proverbs 20:6. Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness "Most men are ready enough to claim to themselves a large share of virtue and piety; but where is the man of true and undissembled virtue and holiness, who studies rather to be than to seem good?" See Schultens.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/proverbs-20.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 801

TRUE PIETY IS RARE

Proverbs 20:6. Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness; but a faithful man who can find?

IF we were to apply to every individual of mankind for his own character, and to form our estimate of the world from the aggregate report, we should soon find, that self-knowledge is a rare attainment, and that men are but partial judges in their own cause. Hence it is, that the more intercourse we have with the world, the more we learn to distrust the professions of men, and to suspend our judgment of them, till we have more substantial ground whereon to form it. Some indeed, from seeing unsuspecting youth so often become a prey to designing men, and frankness and candour so often fall a sacrifice to deceit and treachery, have been led almost to expel charity from their hearts, and practically to reverse its most established laws. Charity would require that we believe every man honest, till we have evidence to the contrary: but they exempt no man from their suspicions, till a full experience of his integrity has constrained them to revere his character. But between the extremes of blind confidence and uncharitable suspicion, there is a medium, a cautious reserve, which prudence dictates, and religion approves. Such a reserve seems naturally, and as it were necessarily, to result from the observation in our text; an observation humiliating indeed to our proud nature, but justified by the actual state of mankind in all ages; and fitly calculated to guard us against an undue confidence either in ourselves or others.

This observation we shall confirm, by shewing,

I. That a profession of goodness is common—

The virtues of truth, honour, integrity, benevolence, friendship, liberality, are claimed by every one as the inherent and characteristic qualities of his heart: and even piety itself is, if men’s opinions of themselves be true, an inmate of every bosom. “Goodness” is not only approved by all, but claimed as the property of all:

1. Of the profane—

[They do not indeed boast of their goodness; they will say, as hypocrites do, that ‘they are as good as their neighbours. It is true, they are not always quite so correct in their conduct as they might be; yea, they are sometimes betrayed into follies which they cannot justify: but they mean no harm; they injure nobody; they have good intentions, good dispositions, good hearts’ — — —The fruit is bad, they acknowledge: but they will have it, that the tree is good.]

2. Of the moral—

[These have some more pretensions to goodness, it may be thought: but their estimate of their own character is scarcely less erroneous than the judgment of the profane. They are observant of many duties; and oftentimes are really eminent for honour and integrity in their dealings. But they omit from their catalogue of duties all that pertains to the spiritual life, and content themselves with a system of heathen ethics. Humility and contrition, faith and love, heavenly-mindedness, and communion with God, are scarcely considered by them as forming any part of true goodness: on the contrary, they allow themselves in self-esteem, self-preference, self-righteousness, and self-dependence; and, when full of these hateful dispositions, they will be “thanking God (with the Pharisee) that they are not as other men [Note: Luke 18:11],” and will, in the habit of their minds at least, say to a repenting publican, “Stand off; come not near to me; I am holier than thou [Note: Isaiah 65:5.].” Of these St. Paul says, that “they have the form of godliness, but deny the power thereof [Note: 2 Timothy 2:5.].”]

3. Of the unsound professor—

[No one stands higher in his own conceit, than the person who has learned to talk about the Gospel, but not to practise its precepts. Because he has a zeal for some religious tenets, or for his own particular party in the Church, he is ready to conclude himself a true, perhaps an eminent, Christian; though his religion is seated altogether in his head, and has never descended to his heart. He never stops to inquire into his spirit and conduct, or to examine whether his tempers and dispositions accord with those of Christ. It is highly probable that he is guilty of very shameful neglect in many of his social and domestic duties: as a master he is proud and imperious; as a servant, inattentive and impatient of rebuke; as a parent, remiss in the instruction of his family; as a child, wilful and disobedient to his parents; in conversation, censorious; in dealings, unfaithful; and in the whole of his demeanor, conceited, forward, petulant, morose. Yet behold, this man, because he can talk about religion, arrogates to himself the title of good. Truly this man, whatever he may think of himself, belongs to “the generation that are pure in their own eyes, but are not washed from their filthiness [Note: Proverbs 30:12.].” He “professes to know God; but in works denies him [Note: Titus 1:16.].”]

But however common a profession of goodness may be, it must be confessed,

II. That a life suited to this profession is very rare—

We have seen what opinion we should form of the world, if we implicitly received men’s record of themselves. But, if we apply to those who have been most conversant with the world, what shall we think of it then? Will they not tell us, that scarce any man is at all to be trusted, where his own interests are at stake: that it is scarcely possible to have dealings in any branch of commerce without meeting with numberless frauds and impositions: and that, if you rely on men’s professions of disinterestedness and friendship, you will, as soon as you come into any great trouble, find yourself in the predicament of one, “who has a broken tooth, or a foot out of joint [Note: Proverbs 25:19.];” being not only deceived in your expectations of succour, but deriving great pain from your endeavours to obtain it?

Even in reference to these virtues to which all lay claim, and to be destitute of which they would account it the greatest disgrace, we may apply that humiliating question, “A faithful man who can find?” We must not indeed understand this question as importing that no such person can be found: but only, that there are very few. But we must not limit the question to mere heathen virtues: we must extend it to all the obligations, which, as Christians, we acknowledge. Who then is faithful,

1. To his principles?

[As Christians, we profess to lie low before God, to live by faith on his dear Son, to devote ourselves unreservedly to his service, and to seek our happiness in communion with God. But where are they whose lives correspond with these professions? Are they not so few, that they are even “signs and wonders upon earth?” — — — As for the generality, they will commend departed saints, but revile and persecute the living ones: they will applaud goodness in general, but decry and discourage it in its most exalted particulars.]

2. To his promises?

[In our baptism we all promised to “renounce the devil and all his works, the pomps and vanities of this wicked world, and all the sinful lusts of the flesh.” When we were confirmed, we renewed these promises, and confirmed, by our own personal consent, the engagements that had been before made in our behalf. If we have attended at the Lord’s Supper, we there also solemnly dedicated unto God ourselves, our souls and bodies, to be a reasonable, holy, and lively sacrifice to him; to be employed in his service, and, if he see fit, to be consumed for his glory. And how have we fulfilled these promises? Has the world been under our feet? Have all the desires of the flesh been mortified? Have the service and enjoyment of God been the one business of our lives? — — —]

3. To his convictions?

[There is no one so thoughtless or obdurate, but he has at some times a conviction arising in his mind, that he ought to repent, and turn to God, and to stand ready for death and judgment. Even the most advanced Christians feel many secret reproofs in their consciences, and are constrained to acknowledge, that they should be more meek and humble, more earnest and vigilant, more pure and spiritual. But who is faithful to his convictions? Who makes the advances that he ought, or the advances that he might? — — —]

Let us learn then from this subject,

1. To be jealous over ourselves—

[If there be so much self-deceit in the world, who are we, that we should be altogether free from it? Have not we a great measure of self-love within us, as well as others? Are not we liable to be biassed in our judgment by passion and interest? and is not our heart, no less than the hearts of others, “deceitful above all things and desperately wicked?” Surely we have need to tremble, when we hear God saying to us, “There is a way that seemeth right unto a man, and the end thereof are the ways of death [Note: Proverbs 14:12.]:” and again, “That which is highly esteemed among men, is an abomination in the sight of God [Note: Luke 16:15.].” Let us then be on our guard against the overweening conceit of our own goodness: let us bring ourselves to the touchstone of God’s word: and let us beg of God to “search and try us, to see if there be any wicked way in us; and to lead us in the way everlasting [Note: Psalms 139:23-24.].” “Not he that commendeth himself is approved, but he whom the Lord commendeth [Note: 2 Corinthians 10:18.].”]

2. To seek the influences of God’s grace—

[It is no easy matter to be a Christian indeed, “an Israelite without guile.” We may be free from gross sin, and yet far enough from that state in which we ought to be. Our own efforts (so to speak) may suffice to “keep the outside clean;” but who, except God, can cleanse the heart? None, but he who formed the universe at first, can create our souls anew: nor unless “chosen and called by him,” shall we ever be found “faithful” in the last day [Note: Revelation 17:14.]. Let us, under a full conviction of our own insufficiency, cry mightily unto him; that he would “put a new spirit within us, and cause us to keep his statutes and his commandments, to do them [Note: Ezekiel 36:26-27].” It is “he who must work all our works in us;” it is he alone that can make us “sincere and without offence until the day of Christ!”]

3. To value and trust in the righteousness of Christ—

[Who amongst us would dare to found his hopes of salvation on his own faithfulness? Who is not sensible that he has, in instances without number, been unfaithful to his principles, his promises, and his convictions? If we presumed to stand on that ground, God would say, “Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee, thou wicked servant.” But, if we were not conscious of any unfaithfulness, we still could not venture to make that the foundation of our hopes; because we are so ignorant of ourselves, and so prone to self-deceit. We could even then only say with the Apostle, “I know nothing by myself, yet am I not hereby justified: but he that judgeth me is the Lord:” yes. we must then cast ourselves altogether on the mercy of God in Christ Jesus. Let this then be done by every one of us: and, instead of proclaiming every one his own goodness, let us all humble ourselves before God in dust and ashes, and say with the Church of old, “In the Lord alone have I righteousness and strength [Note: Isaiah 45:24.].”]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/proverbs-20.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Most men are forward to profess religion, and speak of their own good deeds; but a faithful man, one who is indeed what he seemeth and professeth himself to be,

who can find? there are but few such to be found.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/proverbs-20.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6.Most’ proclaim’ own goodness — Will make known, or publish, his own kindness. The point seems to be, that there are many professors of virtue and religion; but a true man, a truly virtuous and pious man, being unobtrusive, is hard to find. The expression , (mi yimtsa,) who can find? according to a Hebrew idiom, may have the force of a wish: O that I might find a faithful man. Comp. Proverbs 13:17; Proverbs 14:5; Proverbs 31:10. For the general meaning, see Psalms 116:11; Romans 3:4.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/proverbs-20.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Faithful. Few continue steady to their engagements or friends, whom they will assist to a certain point. In God these two virtues always go together, Psalm lxxxiv. 11. But they are rarely found in men. (Calmet)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/proverbs-20.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

men. Hebrew. "adam. App-14.

every one. Hebrew. "Ish "ish. App-14.

his own goodness. Illustrations: Absalom (2 Samuel 15:4); Jehu (2 Kings 10:16, 2 Kings 10:31); Scribes, &c. (Matthew 6:2; Matthew 23:5); the rich young man (Matthew 19:20, Matthew 19:22).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/proverbs-20.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness: but a faithful man who can find?

Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness - his own beneficence to others, as the Pharisee did Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness - his own beneficence to others, as the Pharisee did (Luke 18:11).

But a faithful man who can find? - a man who in very deed performs the beneficence which he professes. Few, in acts of so-called charity, do them from sincere love to God and to their neighbour, without reference to their own gain or honour,

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/proverbs-20.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness.—Will be full of his benevolent intentions, “but a faithful man,” who carries out these promises, “who can find?”

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/proverbs-20.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness: but a faithful man who can find?
proclaim
25:14; 27:2; Matthew 6:2; Luke 18:8,11,28; 22:33; 2 Corinthians 12:11
goodness
or, bounty. but.
Psalms 12:1; Ecclesiastes 7:28; Jeremiah 5:1; Micah 7:2; Luke 18:8; John 1:47
Reciprocal: Proverbs 21:2 - right;  Proverbs 28:20 - faithful;  Matthew 9:14 - Why;  Matthew 26:33 - yet;  Luke 16:15 - Ye

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/proverbs-20.html.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

Заметьте:

(1) легко найти людей, притворяющихся добрыми и щедрыми. Многие назовут себя милосердными, будут хвалиться своими добрыми делами, совершенными и планируемыми, или, по крайней мере, своей любовью к добрым делам. Большинство людей будет много говорить о своей благотворительности, щедрости, гостеприимстве и благочестии; они будут трубить о себе, как фарисеи, но это возвещает о том, как мало милосердия они имеют, делая из этого представление.

(2) Трудно найти действительно добрых и щедрых людей, которые делают больше, чем говорят или хотят, чтобы о них говорили, и окажутся настоящими друзьями в стесненных обстоятельствах. Такой человек, которому можно довериться, похож на черного лебедя.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary
>
>on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-20.html. 1706.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

It is hard to find those that have done, and will do more good than they speak, or care to hear spoken of.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Concise Commentary on Proverbs 20:6". "Matthew Henry Concise Commentary
>
>on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/proverbs-20.html. 1706.