Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 69:1

For the choir director; according to Shoshannim. A Psalm of David.

Save me, O God, For the waters have threatened my life.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Jesus, the Christ;   Music;   Persecution;   Water;   Scofield Reference Index - Psalms;   Thompson Chain Reference - Afflictions;   Blessings-Afflictions;   Trials;   Waters of Affliction;   The Topic Concordance - Enemies;   Jesus Christ;   Reproach;   Sacrifice;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Water;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Psalms, the Book of;   Shushan;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Water;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jonah;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Affliction;   Imprecation, Imprecatory Psalms;   Music, Instruments, Dancing;   Shoshannim;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Psalms;   Sin;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Lord's Supper (Ii);   Sanhedrin;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cedron;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - God;   Psalms the book of;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Shoshan'nim;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Baptism;   Water;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for May 18;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The waters are come in unto my soul - I am in the deepest distress. The waters have broken their dikes, and are just ready to sweep me away! Save me, Lord! In such circumstances I can have no other help.

In the first, second, third, fourteenth, and fifteenth verses, the psalmist, speaking in the person of the captives in Babylon, compares their captivity to an abyss of waters, breaking all bounds, and ready to swallow them up; to a deep mire, in which there was no solid bottom, and no standing; and to a pot. in which they were about to be inclosed for ever. This is strongly figurative, and very expressive.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-69.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Save me, O God - That is, Interpose and deliver me from the dangers which have come upon me.

For the waters are come in unto my soul - So as to endanger my life. Waters, deep, raging, overwhelming, are images of calamity or danger. See the notes at Psalm 32:6. Compare Psalm 42:7.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-69.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

PSALM 69

PRAYER OF ONE AFFLICTED FOR THE TRUTH

SUPERSCRIPTION: FOR THE CHIEF MUSICIAN; SET TO SHOSHANNIM.

A PSALM OF DAVID.

There is no convincing evidence in the psalm itself that David is not the author, although many scholars assume that David could not have written it. The reasons assigned for such opinions however are unconvincing; and the verses usually cited are capable of other interpretations which we shall note during the study of the text.

Addis thought that, "Maccabean times suit the situation best, but Maccabean origin is incapable of proof."[1] "Kirkpatrick made a sturdy defense of the notion that Jeremiah wrote it,"[2] but as far as we can tell nobody agreed with him.

Leupold wrote, "Despite many other possibilities that have been suggested (regarding the authorship), we still feel that the suggestion offered by the Hebrew (superscription) has the most to commend it - `of David.'"[3]

The most interesting thing about this psalm is that "More than any other in the whole Psalter, except Psalms 22, this psalm is quoted in the New Testament."[4]

"They hated me without a cause" (Psalms 69:4) was quoted by Jesus Christ in John 15:25.

"Zeal for thy house shall eat me up" (Psalms 69:9) is quoted in John 2:17.

"The reproaches of them that reproached thee fell upon me" (Psalms 69:9b), is quoted in Romans 15:3.

"Let their table before them become a snare; and when they are in peace, let it become a trap" (Psalms 69:22) is quoted in Romans 11:9.

"Let their eyes be darkened so that they cannot see" (Psalms 69:23) is quoted in Romans 11:10, where the apostle Paul applied it to the hardening of Israel.

"Let their habitation be desolate" (Psalms 69:25) is quoted in Acts 1:20, where it is applied to Judas Iscariot.

In Romans 11:9, the apostle Paul unequivocally recognized David as the author of this psalm; and our own opinion is that a single word from Paul is worth more than a whole library of critical denials that David wrote it.

"They gave me also gall for my food; and in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink" (Psalms 69:21). Although this verse is not quoted in the New Testament, it is significant that all four of the gospels recorded the giving of vinegar to Christ on the cross (Matthew 27:48-50; Mark 15:36; Luke 23:36; and John 19:29). It is evident that all of the Gospel writers considered that action of giving Jesus vinegar to drink was a fulfillment in the Anti-Type of what had happened in the Type. Apparently, the motive for giving Christ vinegar on Calvary was different from what seems to be the motive here against David. The action of the Roman soldier who offered Christ vinegar is cited by Dummelow as an act of mercy designed to allay Jesus' sufferings,[5] a view which this writer has often accepted, but Luke seems to deny this, writing that, "The soldiers also mocked him, coming to him, offering him vinegar" (Luke 23:36).

IS THE PSALM MESSIANIC?

In some degree, it most certainly is, but not in its entirety. The psalmist's admission of his own sins means that the total poem cannot be applied to Christ; but David was indeed a type of Christ, and many of the things in the life of David find their echo and fulfillment in David's Greater Son, the Lord Jesus Christ.

THE PSALMIST DESCRIBES HIS SITUATION

Psalms 69:1-4

"Save me, O God, for the waters are come in unto my soul.

I sink in deep mire, where there is no standing;

I am come into deep waters, where the floods overflow me.

I am weary with my crying; my throat is dried:

Mine eyes fail while I wait for my God.

They that hate me without a cause are more than the hairs of my head;

They that would cut me off, being mine enemies wrongfully, are mighty:

That which I took not away I have to restore."

The language here, at least in part, is figurative, because deep waters and mire simply do not belong in the same situation. To us, this language seems appropriate to the times of David's fleeing before Saul. It fits that period better than any other with which we are familiar in the life of David. His foes were "mighty," able to compel him to restore things he had not taken, and who were determined to `cut him off.' Even the ribald singing against him in the city gates mentioned a little later fits that period better than any other.

"They that hate me without a cause are more than the hairs of my head" (Psalms 69:4). Why was David hated without a cause? It all started with Saul's jealous hatred; as the king of Israel, Saul had the ability to marshal all the resources of the kingdom against David; and human nature being what it is, countless people were willing to take sides with Saul against David. Saul's enmity against David was the only motivation that the people needed to hate David.

The situation regarding the countless people who hated Jesus Christ without cause reflected perfectly the conditions that confronted David. The "false shepherds" of Israel (Zechariah 11:1-8), the Pharisees, the Sadducees, and the Herodians, were extremely jealous of the meek and humble Jesus, whose life-style they viciously hated; and their position of leadership in Israel enabled them to rally practically the whole nation to their position of hating the Messiah. An outstanding example of that is their maneuvering the Jerusalem mob to cry out for a choice of Barabbas in the crucifixion scene.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-69.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Save me, O God,.... The petitioner is Christ; not as a divine Person, as such he is blessed for ever, and stands in no need of help and assistance; but as man, and in distressed and suffering circumstances. As a priest, it was part of his work to intercede, as well as to offer sacrifice; and though he did not offer a sin offering for himself, yet he offered up supplications, with strong cryings and tears; and, as the surety of his people, he prayed, in point of right and justice, both for himself and them; see John 17:4. The person petitioned is God the Father, who was able to save him, and always heard him; and did in this petition, Hebrews 5:7; which perfectly agrees with some petitions of Christ, recorded in the New Testament, John 12:27. These show the weakness of the human nature, the weight of sin upon him, and his sense of the wrath of God; and which, notwithstanding, were made with limitations and restrictions, and even with a correction. Moreover, this may also design help and assistance from his divine Father, which was promised him, and he expected and had, in the acceptable time, in the day of salvation: and he was so saved in death, as that he abolished that, and destroyed him that had the power of it; and was quickly raised from the grave, and thereby saved out of it. And this he could have done himself, but he would be saved in a legal way, in a way of justice; and as a point of honour, when he had done the work, he, as a surety, engaged to do. The reasons enforcing this petition follow:

for the waters are come in unto my soul: the Messiah represents his case, in these words, and in Psalm 69:2, as like to that of a man standing up to his chin in water, and the waters running into his mouth, just suffocating him; and that in a miry place, where he could not set his feet firm, nor get himself out; and even overflowed with the floods, and immersed in the deep waters, and so in the most imminent danger. These overwhelming waters may signify the floods of ungodly men that encompassed him, the assembly of the wicked that enclosed him; and the proud waters that went over his soul, the Gentiles and people of Israel, that were gathered against him to destroy him; and so the Targum interprets it of the camp of sinners, that pressed him on every side, as water: the whole posse of devils may also be designed, for now was the hour and power of darkness; Satan, and his principalities and powers, came in like a flood upon him, to swallow him up; innumerable evils, the sins of his people, came upon him from every quarter, and pressed him sore; the curses of the law fell upon him, which may be compared to the bitter water of jealousy that caused the curse. These entered into him, when he was made a curse for his people; and the wrath of God went over him, and lay hard upon him, and came about him like water, into his very soul, which made him exceeding sorrowful, even unto death.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-69.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

"To the chief Musician upon a Shoshannim, [A Psalm] of David." Save me, O God; for the b waters are come in unto [my] soul.

(a) Of Shoshannim, read (Psalm 45:1).

(b) David shows by the waters the great dangers he was in, out of which God delivered him.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-69.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Save me, O God; for the waters are come in unto my soul.

Waters — Tribulations.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-69.html. 1765.

Treasury of David

(68:1-2) «Спаси меня, Боже». «Других спасал, а Себя Самого не может спасти». «Он, во дни плоти Своей, с сильным воплем и со слезами принес молитвы и моления Могущему спасти Его от смерти; и услышан был за Свое благоговение» (Евр. 5:7). Так молился о спасении Давид, и его великий Сын, Иисус Христос, воззвал к Богу о спасении теми же словами. Это второй псалом, начинающийся со слов «спаси меня, Боже»; первый, псалом 53, является краткой версией данного псалма. Удивительно, что эта печальная песнь следует сразу же после радостной песни восхождения, но это еще раз доказывает то, что жизнь благословенного Искупителя была причудливым переплетением радости и печали. Ныне Его глава увенчана славой, но когдато на нее был одет терновый венец. Тот, к кому мы взываем «спаси, Господи», когдато взывал «спаси меня, Боже». «Ибо воды дошли до души моей». Душа Его была отягчена глубокой, смертоносной печалью. В первую очередь Спаситель сетовал не на физическую боль: жалоба Его начинается со слов о великом душевном страдании, а не со слов о желчи, данной Ему в пищу. Бушующее море не так опасно для корабля, как вода, попавшая в трюм. Кто может подкрепить пораженный дух? Господь наш в этом стихе подобен пророку Ионе, который воззвал: «Объяли меня воды до души моей, бездна заключила меня». Иисус Христос вступил в глубокие воды, подвизаясь против греха по воле Божьей, и огромные волны, гонимые ураганным ветром, увлекли Его в бездну, наполнив душу великой скорбью. Впрочем, ныне Господь может сострадать нам, когда мы попадаем в подобные обстоятельства и взываем вместе с тонущим апостолом Петром: «Господи! спаси нас, погибаем».

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Spurgeon, Charles H. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "C.H. Spurgeons's The Treasury of David". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tod/psalms-69.html. 1865-1885

Scofield's Reference Notes

Shoshannim (See Scofield "Psalms 45:1").

Save me, O God

The N.T. quotations from, and references to, this Psalm indicate in what way it adumbrates Christ. It is the psalm of His humiliation and rejection Psalms 69:4; Psalms 69:7; Psalms 69:8; Psalms 69:10-12. Psalms 69:14-20 may well describe the exercises of His holy soul in Gethsemane Matthew 26:36-45 while Psalms 69:21 is a direct reference to the cross; Matthew 27:34; Matthew 27:48; John 19:28. The imprecatory verses Psalms 69:22-28 are connected Romans 11:9; Romans 11:10 with the present judicial blindness of Israel, Psalms 69:25 having special reference to Judas. Acts 1:20 who is thus made typical of his generation, which shared his guilt.

See Psalms 72, next in order of the Messianic Psalms.

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Psalms 69:1". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/psalms-69.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 69:1 « To the chief Musician upon Shoshannim, [A Psalm] of David. » Save me, O God; for the waters are come in unto [my] soul.

A Psalm of David] Quando rebellabat Sheba, saith the Syriac, made upon the occasion of Sheba’s rebellion presently after Absalom’s. Hence he cries out, as one almost overwhelmed,

Ver. 1. Save me, O God] Thou, who delightest to save such as are forsaken of their hopes. The Fathers generally take this psalm to be prophetic touching the passion of Christ, and his praying then to the Father. David had his troubles which gave occasion to the penning of this psalm, but those were all but as a picture and prelude of Christ’s far greater sorrows, Spiritus autem sanctus manifeste se prodit in hoc psalmo.

For the waters are come in unto my soul] Ever after Noah’s flood, that dismal destruction, great and grievous afflictions were set forth by the rushing in of waters, and overwhelming therewith. God’swrath was poured upon Christ as a mighty torrent of waters, and, therefore, this expression applied to him hath a special emphasis; his soul was heavy even to the death. Fluctus fluctum trudebat, One deep called upon another, &c. Oh the soul of sufferings which his soul then suffered!

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-69.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 69.

David complaineth of his affliction: he prayeth for deliverance: he devoteth his enemies to destruction: he praiseth God with thanksgiving.

To the chief musician upon Shoshannim: A Psalm of David.

Title. לדוד שׁושׁנים על למנצח lamnatseach al shoshanniim ledavid.] As a great part of this psalm is most applicable to David's distress at that time, it is most likely that he composed it when under the persecution of Saul: and Bishop Patrick supposes that he revised it again upon those straits to which he was reduced by Absalom, and at which time he supposes him to have added the 35th verse, where he mentions Zion; for that was not in the possession of the Israelites during the reign of Saul. Every one must perceive, that there are many passages in this psalm which, if they are applicable to David at all, refer in a much higher sense to the passion of our Blessed Saviour. Theodoret observes, that it is prophetical, and foretold the sufferings of our Saviour, and the final destruction of the Jews on that account, The title of the Syriac version is to the same purpose. Dr. Patten, in his Vindication of David, observes very judiciously, that the Book of Psalms was dictated by the Spirit of God, and some of them prophetical of the kingdom and person of Christ; many parts of them being spoken by David, not only with reference to his circumstances at that time, but likewise as Christ's representative. This psalm, which seems to breathe the most vehement resentment, and, in our translation, appears like an execratory prayer upon David's enemies, is to be understood in this sense, and is cleared of that imputation by the authority of St. Peter and St. Paul, Acts 16:20.; Romans 11:9 the former of whom cites these passages as prophetical of the traitor Judas. This psalm is by St. Paul interpreted as foretelling the state, not only of Judas, but of all those his obstinate countrymen who rejected the salvation offered by Jesus Christ. In the same passage Isaiah is cited as foretelling their spiritual blindness. David, therefore, and Isaiah mean the same thing, a prediction of what the Spirit of God foreshewed them, though their forms of expression be different. The two apostles cite their respective passages as prophecies, but in the imperative form; a testimony which I presume sufficiently frees that form, wherever David in similar cases makes use of it, from all imputation of rancorous resentment. And this apostolical interpretation of the scope of this psalm, which seems to be execratory, is indisputably the true key to open the design and meaning of all others of the like tendency. David in all of them, however his forms of expression may vary, pronounces only the decrees of God against the enemies of Jesus Christ, whose person the Psalmist here assumes, as in many other Psalms.

Psalms 69:1. For the waters are come in unto my soul The figurative expressions in this and the following verse denote very great difficulties and distresses. See on Psalms 42:7.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-69.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

Here is another gospel Psalm, not of David's troubles, but of David's Lord. The references made to it, in many parts of our Lord's life by himself, and both then and afterwards by his servants the apostles, decidedly show to whom it belongs. Take it in one collected point, and it sketches many of the outlines of Christ's passion, from his birth to the cross. Like the 22nd Psalm, it begins with a view of Christ in his abasement and sufferings, and ends with the relation of his exaltation and triumphs.

To the chief musician upon Shoshannim, A Psalm of David.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-69.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

PSALM 69

THE ARGUMENT

This Psalm of David consists of his complaints and fervent prayers, and comfortable predictions of his deliverance, and of the ruin of his enemies. But the condition of this Psalm is like that of divers others, wherein although the matter or substance of it agree in some sort to David, yet there are some singular passages, which he delivers with a particular respect unto Christ, of whom he was an eminent type, and upon whom his thoughts were much and often fixed, and of whom they are more fitly and fully understood; and therefore they are justly applied to him in the New Testament, as we shall see.

David (as a type of Christ) complaineth of his heavy and manifold afflictions, Psalms 69:1-12; fervently prayeth for help and deliverance, Psalms 69:13-21; giveth over his enemies to, destruction, Psalms 69:22-29; and praiseth God in confidence of being accepted, Psalms 69:30-34, and Zion saved, Psalms 69:35,36.

Waters, i.e. tribulations, which are oft expressed by waters; as hath been observed.

Unto my soul, i.e. to my vital parts; so that I am ready to be choked with them. My soul is exceeding sorrowful even unto death.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-69.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1.Waters—Great “waters” are a common emblem of extreme distress and danger. Psalms 18:4; Psalms 32:6.

Unto my soul—I am as one upon the point of strangulation by drowning. The waters are rushing into me, even to my heart. See Lamentations 3:54; Jonah 2:4

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-69.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Remembrance. This is all that occurs in Hebrew, or in many Greek copies, though the following words were perhaps extant in the copy of the Septuagint, or were added to complete the sentence. Several of the verses are found in Psalm xxxiv., and xxxix., and seem to have been used as a form of prayer in any danger. (Berthier) --- David foresaw that Christ would pray for the safety of his natural and mystical body, and would be heard. (Menochius) --- The following psalm is a sequel to this. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-69.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Title. A Psalm. No Hebrew for this.

of David. Relating to the true David, Israel"s Redeemer. Psalm 22 is Christ as the sin offering; Psalm 40 as the whole burnt offering ; and this, Psalm 69 as the trespass offering. Verse prefers to John 15:25; verses: Psalms 69:14-20 refer to Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36-45); Psalms 69:21 to the Cross (Matthew 27:34, Matthew 27:48. John 19:29); verses: Psalms 69:22-28 to Romans 11:9, Romans 11:10; Romans 69:25 to Judas (Acts 1:20).

God. Hebrew. Elohim.

waters. Put by Figure of speech Hypocatastasis (App-6) for great troubles.

come in unto my soul: i.e. threaten my life.

my soul = me (emphatic). Hebrew. nephesh, App-13.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-69.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Save me, O God; for the waters are come in unto my soul.

Psalms 69:1-36.-The sufferer's misery and cry to God (Psalms 69:1-4); God knows that the reproach which he suffers, as if sinful and foolish, he incurs through zeal for God's glory (Psalms 69:5-12); he renews prayer for deliverance (Psalms 69:13-18); again he appeals to God's knowledge of his reproach from foes (Psalms 69:19-21); their doom (Psalms 69:22-28); poor and sorrowful himself, he is sure the salvation of God will set him up on high (Psalms 69:29); so he resolves to praise God; the humble pious shall be glad at the Lord's having heard the poor (Psalms 69:30-33); heaven and earth are invited to praise God for saving Zion, that His people may dwell there (Psalms 69:34-36). This psalm and Psalms 22:1-31 are the psalms most of all applied to Christ in the New Testament (John 15:25, cf. Psalms 69:4; John 2:17, cf. Psalms 69:9; also Romans 15:3; Matthew 27:34; Matthew 27:48, with Psalms 69:21; Acts 1:20, cf. Psalms 69:25; also Matthew 23:38). The two characteristics of this psalm, which is 'one great martyr image,' are --

(1) The fullness of detail of the judgments on the sufferer's foes;

(2) The prominence of the fact that he suffers for the sake of God (Hengstenberg). With the curses on the reprobate, Psalms 69:22-28, cf. David in 1 Samuel 26:19; 2 Samuel 3:29.

Title. - Upon Shoshannim - i:e., upon the lilies; an emblem for the servants of God (Psalms 69:36), and the lovely consolation and salvation from the Lord which are theirs, (cf. note on title, Psalms 45:1-17.) There is a play on similar sounds, " showshaniym (Hebrew #7799) and, Psalms 69:1, hoshiy`eeniy (Hebrew #3467), "save me," giving a key to the former enigmatic term.

Save me, O God; for the waters are come in unto my soul - like another type, Jonah (Jonah 2:5).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-69.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(1) The waters . . .—For this common and obvious figure of a “sea of troubles” comp. Psalms 18:4; Psalms 18:16; Psalms 32:6; Psalms 42:7.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-69.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Save me, O God; for the waters are come in unto my soul.
(Title
&) Shoshannim.
45:1; 60:1; 80:1; *titles
A Psalm
It is uncertain when this Psalm was composed; though it is probable that it was written by David during the rebellion of Absalom. It is an exceedingly fine composition; it evidently refers to the advent, passion, and resurrection of our Lord, to the vocation of the Gentiles, and the reprobation of Jews: See the Marginal References.
the waters
2,14,15; 18:4; 42:7; Isaiah 28:17; 43:2; Lamentations 3:54; Jonah 2:3-5; Revelation 12:15,16; 17:15
Reciprocal: Leviticus 1:15 - wring off his head;  Leviticus 5:11 - no oil;  Job 22:11 - abundance;  Job 30:19 - cast me;  Psalm 22:11 - Be not;  Psalm 32:6 - in the floods;  Psalm 45:1 - Shoshannim;  Psalm 88:17 - They;  Psalm 93:3 - The floods;  Psalm 102:1 - overwhelmed;  Psalm 118:25 - Save;  Psalm 130:1 - Out of;  Psalm 144:7 - deliver me;  Jeremiah 12:5 - swelling;  Jonah 2:5 - GeneralMatthew 14:30 - Lord;  Matthew 20:18 - and the;  Matthew 26:24 - Son of man goeth;  Matthew 26:36 - while;  Matthew 26:42 - the second;  Matthew 26:54 - GeneralMark 9:12 - he must;  Mark 14:21 - goeth;  Mark 14:33 - and began;  Mark 14:49 - but;  Luke 8:24 - Master;  Luke 9:22 - GeneralLuke 18:31 - and;  Luke 22:22 - truly;  Luke 24:26 - GeneralLuke 24:44 - in the psalms;  John 12:27 - is;  Acts 3:18 - all;  1 Corinthians 15:3 - according;  Hebrews 5:7 - when;  1 Peter 1:11 - the sufferings

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-69.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1.Save me, O God! for the waters, etc. Under the figure of waters, the Psalmist represents his condition as so extremely distressing that it brought him even to the brink of despair; and yet we know that, so far from being a soft and an effeminate person, he was one who encountered and overcame dreadful temptations with extraordinary courage. Whence we may infer the bitterness of the distress with which he was at that time afflicted. Some understand the word soul as denoting life; (68) but this gives a very cold and unsatisfactory meaning. It rather signifies the heart. A man when he falls into an abyss of waters, may prevent for some time the water from entering his body, by stopping his mouth and his nostrils, but at length, from its being impossible for a human being to live without respiration, suffocation will compel him to let in the waters, and they will penetrate even to the heart. David by this metaphor would intimate, not only that the waters had covered and overwhelmed him, but also that he had been forced to draw them into his body.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 69:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-69.html. 1840-57.