Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 11:15

Then the seventh angel sounded; and there were loud voices in heaven, saying, "The kingdom of the world has become the kingdom of our Lord and of His Christ; and He will reign forever and ever."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   Gentiles;   Jesus Continued;   Trumpet;   Scofield Reference Index - World-System;   Thompson Chain Reference - Conversion;   Eternal;   Gentiles;   Kingdom;   Missions, World-Wide;   Mutability-Immutability;   Spiritual;   The Topic Concordance - Government;   Saints;   Seals;   Wrath;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Christ, the King;   Second Coming of Christ, the;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Antichrist;   Mystery;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jesus christ;   Kingdom of god;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Apocalyptic;   Destroy, Destruction;   God;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Joy;   Order;   CARM Theological Dictionary - False prophet, (the);   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Adam (1);   Age;   Daniel, the Book of;   Dispensations;   Firstborn;   Gentiles;   Jericho;   Jesus Christ;   Judah, Kingdom of;   Nebuchadnezzar;   Number;   Obadiah;   Redeemer;   Revelation of John, the;   Thousand Years;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Beast;   Hope;   World;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ascension;   Attributes of Christ;   Augustus (2);   Eschatology;   Evolution (Christ and);   Kingdom Kingdom of God;   Lord;   Mediator;   Nation;   Salvation Save Saviour;   Supremacy;   Tares ;   World;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Revelation, the;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Millenarians;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Apocalyptic Literature;   King, Christ as;   Parousia;   Reign;   Revelation of John:;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for March 24;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

There were great voices in heaven - All the heavenly host - angels and redeemed human spirits, joined together to magnify God; that he had utterly discomfited his enemies and rendered his friends glorious. This will be truly the case when the kingdoms of this world become the kingdoms of God and of his Christ, But when shall this be? Some say, that is meant by these words has already taken place in the destruction of the Jewish state, and sending the Gospel throughout the Gentile world. Others say that it refers to the millennium, and to the consummation of all things.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-11.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And the seventh angel sounded - See the notes on Revelation 8:2, Revelation 8:6-7. This is the last of the trumpets, implying, of course, that under this the series of visions was to end, and that this was to introduce the state of things under which the affairs of the world were to be wound up. The place which this occupies in the order of time, is when the events pertaining to the colossal Roman power - the fourth kingdom of Daniel Daniel 7:9-14, Daniel 7:27-28 should have been introduced. This, both in Daniel and in John, is to occur when the mighty power of the papacy shall have been overthrown at the termination of the twelve hundred and sixty years of its duration. See the notes on Daniel 7:25. In both Daniel and John the termination of that persecuting power is the commencement of the reign of the saints; the downfall of the papacy, the introduction of the kingdom of God, and its establishment on the earth.

And there were great voices in heaven - As of exultation and praise. The grand consummation had come, the period so long anticipated and desired when God should reign on the earth had arrived, and this lays the foundation for joy and thanksgiving in heaven.

The kingdoms of this world - The modern editions of the New Testament (see Tittmann and Hahn) read this in the singular number - “The kingdom of this world has become,” etc. According to this reading, the meaning would be, either that the sole reign over this world had become that of the Lord Jesus; or, more probably, that the dominion over the earth had been regarded as one in the sense that Satan had reigned over it, but had now become the kingdom of God; that is, that “the kingdoms of this world are many considered in themselves; but in reference to the sway of Satan, there is only one kingdom ruled over by the ‹god of this world‘” (Prof. Stuart). The sense is not materially different whichever reading is adopted; though the authority is in favor of the latter (Wetstein). According to the common reading, the sense is, that all the kingdoms of the earth, being many in themselves, had been now brought under the one scepter of Christ; according to the other, the whole world was regarded as in fact one kingdom - that of Satan - and the scepter had now passed from his hands into those of the Saviour.

The kingdoms of our Lord - Or, the kingdom of our Lord, according to the reading adopted in the previous part of the verse. The word “Lord” here evidently has reference to God as such - represented as the original source of authority, and as giving the kingdom to his Son. See the notes on Daniel 7:13-14; compare Psalm 2:8. The word “Lord” - Κυριος Kurios- implies the notion of possessor, owner, sovereign, supreme ruler - and is thus properly given to God. See Matthew 1:22; Matthew 5:33; Mark 5:19; Luke 1:6, Luke 1:28; Acts 7:33; Hebrews 8:2, Hebrews 8:10; James 4:15, al. saepe.

And of his Christ - Of his anointed; of him who is set apart as the Messiah, and consecrated to this high office. See the notes on Matthew 1:1. He is called “his Christ,” because he is set apart by him, or appointed by him to perform the work appropriate to that office on earth. Such language as what occurs here is often employed, in which God and Christ are spoken of as, in some respects, distinct - as sustaining different offices, and performing different works. The essential meaning here is, that the kingdom of this world had now become the kingdom of God under Christ; that is, that that kingdom is administered by the Son of God.

And he shall reign forever and ever - A kingdom is commenced which shall never terminate. It is not said that this would be on the earth; but the essential idea is, that the scepter of the world had now, after so long a time, come into his hands never more to pass away. The fuller characteristics of this reign are stated in a subsequent part of this book Psalm 2:8; Isaiah 9:7; Isaiah 11:9; Isaiah 45:22; 60; Daniel 2:35, Daniel 2:44-45; Daniel 7:13-14, Daniel 7:27-28; Zechariah 14:9; Malachi 1:11; Luke 1:33. On this whole subject, see the very ample illustrations and proofs in the notes on Daniel 2:44-45; Daniel 7:13-14, Daniel 7:27-28; compare the notes on Revelation 2022.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-11.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Revelation 11:15

The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord and of His Christ.

Ave, Imperator

This text is generally quoted in a missionary connection, and associated with the conversion of the heathen. But it is of much wider scope than that. There are plenty of Christians that want converting, plenty of Churches that want Christianising. The progress of all life in our planet has been a progress from the animal upward to the intellectual, the moral, the spiritual; from mere brute force to the dominion of thought and reason. Ages back mere bigness of mass seemed to count for everything. The so-called “antediluvian” monsters were rampant. As life developed mere bigness became of less and less account, and brain became of more account. Those who can influence mind are the true monarchs of creation. This is the realm in which Christ’s supreme triumphs are to take place. Christ will fascinate and possess the mind of the world, and the mind will rule all the rest. “Strong beliefs win strong men, and then make them stronger.” The masculine but humane morality of Jesus Christ must more and more commend itself to the thinking and influential portion of society. Ideas and institutions which have been long prevalent go down before a superior idea. So shall it be with many world-ideas in presence of the truth of Christ. Many institutions have lived and done their work. They have served their day and generation, but now they have waxed old, and are ready to decay and vanish away in the presence of a nobler ideal. Still, we are not to disparage the old because the new has come. The present forms of animal life are far superior in development and attainment to those whose remains are found in the tertiary rocks. But the forms of to-day could not have existed without the forms that went before. Those very things which Christ’s law and spirit will supplant have been important factors in human progress. When the Apocalyptic dream of the New Jerusalem, the Christian state, the city of God, finally and triumphantly established upon earth, shall find complete fulfilment, it will be characterised by a fuller embodiment of the law of Christ in every sphere of human relationship and conduct. For instance, the kingdom of Art shall become the kingdom of our Lord and of His Christ. It has become so to a great extent. All the noblest paintings, all the grandest buildings in the world during the Christian era, have been the product of the Christian imagination. Certainly the sublimest music owns this inspiration. We need not fear the complete annexation of this kingdom, because the genius of the true Christianity is hopeful and happy. The kingdom of Literature would, in like manner, come under the dominance of Christian ideas. It is hard to say at present whether this tremendous engine for good or evil works most good or evil. What a blessed thing it will be when the domain of literature becomes the domain of Christ; when nothing will be written or read the tendency of which is not to the true elevation and edification of the human mind; when editors shall all be men of conscience, and the venal pen shall be as much an archaeological curiosity as the stone hatchet; when we shall be able to take up any book and feel that it will be safe for our children to read; when we can open even the latest novel from Paris with the confidence that none of our finer sensibilities will be shocked, and that an atmosphere will not be introduced into the home whose poisonous vapours we should shudder to think that our young people will breathe. The kingdom of Commerce, too, shall one day fall under the rule of Christ. That will be indeed a blessed day when men can trust one another, and when all shall be worthy of that trust; when another man’s property shall be as sacred in our eyes as our own; when public funds shall be administered with the same scrupulous integrity with which our own are dispensed. The realm of Amusements, too, shall come under the same rule. The prophecy will find its fulfilment not in the expression of any particular forms of recreation, but in the Christianising of them all. And will it not be a grand day when the kingdom of Politics shall be sanctified by the Spirit of Christ? When debates shall be purged from the pettiness of personality and the rancour of recrimination; when offices shall be filled with the sole aim that the commonwealth shall receive the services of its most capable citizens; and when the statesman’s ruling principle shall be not to catch votes, but to redress wrongs and establish righteousness. And then may we not hope that even the Church itself in that happy day shall come under the dominion of the law of Christ? No longer to be the collection of ecclesiastical antiquities, the museum of theological curiosities, the arena of strife and debate that it is to-day, but the abode of ideal men and women, the home of all the sweet and pure Christian virtues. Then Christians shall no longer “bite and devour one another”; “giving the enemy occasion to blaspheme.” Their energies shall be converted into light, and not into heat, and men will be willing to rejoice in that light. But how shall those great results, of which we have spoken in other spheres, be achieved unless the Church be first true to herself? It is through her that these beneficent impulses upon society must come. We must begin by being ideal Christians if the world is to become an ideal world. (J. Halsey.)

The glory awaiting the Church on earth

I. The probable condition of the world in the accomplishment of this prediction. It will be characterised by--

1. The universal dissemination of Christian knowledge.

2. The general prevalence of religious life.

3. The increase and glory of the Christian Church.

4. The diffusion of happiness throughout the world. Christianity is the parent of morality, industry, patriotism, public spirit.

II. The probable means by which this great event will be produced.

1. The preaching of the gospel.

2. The active zeal of Christians.

3. The operations of Divine providence.

4. The effusion of the Holy Spirit.

III. The duties which arise in anticipating this great consummation.

1. To seek the possession of personal religion.

2. To render all assistance to accelerate the advent of this glorious period.

3. To unite in prayer for the accomplishment of this prediction. (Homilist.)

The kingdom of God

We can imagine, I suppose, that when the Revelation of St. John the Divine was taken to the different Christian Churches, in the upper chambers where they were accustomed to meet together, or in the secret places where they gathered for fear of persecution, after they had read these glowing pages, they must have parted with new feelings of hope in their hearts. They would expect that a time would come speedily when the persecutions would be memories of the past, and the kingdom would be set up, of which they had been reading in such vivid colours. Yet the day passed by, and the Roman power remained, and the Temple, sacred to Diana at Ephesus, was as stable as ever. It happened then as it has happened to many a one since. So it must have been with many of those of the ancient Church, when, all eager and expectant, they found the vision was sealed for the time; they must go their way and tarry until the time should come when the promise would be fulfilled. We can scarcely be surprised at finding that they looked for a very literal fulfilment in the shape of a kingdom which should, by the exercise of power, bear down all opposition. They were told of a great king who went forth “conquering and to conquer.” The tradition of the old Jewish Church was of a people going forth as the Lord’s messengers to crush down all the Lord’s enemies. Again, the majority of Christian people, when they found that the promise could not be realised in that way, looked for something totally different. The promise seemed impossible of literal fulfilment. The kingdom of God became totally distinct from the kingdom of the world. It was something which could only be reached when this world was over. When persecution broke out, when the people were dragged to prison, men felt that the kingdom of God was not of this world, but of that which is to come. And so, little by little, people had that expectation for the realisation of this promise. Does the Christian Church of to-day have the same expectation? Is there any possibility of the realisation of this promise? I would suggest that the realisation is to come through our changed ideas about the kingdom of God; that the kingdom of God does not mean power victorious, but that it means love victorious; that the kingdom of God means what St. Paul does when he writes, “Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good.” What I want to leave in your minds is the conviction that the crown of thorns is the crown of glory; that the Cross is the throne on which Christ is exalted. What do these two things mean--the crown of thorns and the cross of shame? They mean the extremest manifestation of infinite love. Christ has said that love is greater than hate; love is greater than infamy. And that is the only principle on which “the kingdom of this world will become the kingdom of our Lord and of His Christ; and He shall reign for ever and ever.” The Christian Church is slowly abandoning the idea of conquering by mere power. The Christian Church is slowly losing the idea of the kingdom of this world becoming the kingdom of our Lord and of His Christ in the persons of those who pass away beyond this world, and become the subjects of a kingdom which has nothing to do with this world. His kingdom shall come on this earth by the individual members copying the example of Jesus Christ, and believing in the revelation of that love which overcame sin; so that the people who live upon this earth shall be willing subjects of Divine love, and living in perfect love to their fellow-men. (Bp. Courtney.)

Missionary prospects

It is related of Hannibal that, when he had led his men to one of the higher ridges of the Alps, they began to murmur, and requested that they should be reconducted to their native country. Standing on an eminence and waving his hand, the intrepid Carthaginian General directed their attention to the plains of Piedmont below. “Behold,” said he, “these fruitful vineyards and luxuriant fields. A few more struggles, and they are all your own.” These were inspiring words, and they had the desired effect. May we not apply them to the subject of missions, and say, Behold, from the mount of promise, the nations of the earth at the feet of the Church’s exalted Head! A few more struggles on the part of His followers, and voices shall be heard, not in heaven only, but from the innumerable and widely scattered tongues of earth, giving utterance to the joyous announcement, “The kingdoms of this world are become,” etc.

The kingdom of heaven and its progress

You might as well stand on the banks of the Mississippi and be afraid it was going to run up stream as to suppose that the current of Christendom can run more than one way. What would you think of a man who should stand moonstruck over an eddy, and because that didn’t go right forward, declare that the whole flood had got out of its course? So in the stream of time. The things that appear in our day all have bearing on the coming triumph of the gospel and the reign of the Kingdom of Heaven on earth. (H. W. Beecher.)

Jesus will conquer the world

Yonder in the cathedral at Vienna the Emperor Frederick is represented, standing with arm uplifted, and at the tip of his extended fingers are the five vowels, A, E, I, O, U, which, being interpreted, means, “Austria est imperare obi universo”--“Austria will conquer the world.” Another and a gander figure meets the gaze of every Christian of to-day, no matter where his standpoint, and the inscription thereon is in letters of fire: “Jesus est imperare obi universo”--“Jesus will conquer the world.” (C. W. Boot.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Revelation 11:15". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/revelation-11.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And the seventh angel sounded; and there followed great voices in heaven, and they said, The kingdom of the world is become the kingdom of our Lord, and of his Christ: and he shall reign for ever and ever.

This does not signal the approaching end of the world; that event has already occurred. Only then, or after then, shall it be true that the kingdom of the world has become the kingdom of the Lord and of his Christ. As we were told in Revelation 10:7, "In the days of the seventh angel, when he is about to sound, then is finished (not shall be finished) the mystery of God. When the seventh angel sounds, it is already finished. On the cross, Jesus bowed his head and said, "It is finished," and this seventh trumpet is the echo of the glorious achievement there. What is finished? It is finished with evil, with Satan, with wicked men, with sin, and with death. "This announcement tells us that the battle of the ages is ended."[84] "Evil has finally and forever been put down; and good is finally and forever triumphant."[85] Caird was wrong in seeing here, "a jubilant fanfare proclaiming the enthronement of the King of Kings."[86] That event occurred at the ascension of Christ (Matthew 28:18-20).

And there followed great voices in heaven ... These are the voices of the redeemed of all ages, and including all of the heavenly host. Lenski's beautiful summary of this is:

Whose great voices are here referred to? They certainly are the voices of all the saints and all the angels in heaven after the day of judgment has brought the world and time to an end. This entire vision is wonderful in majesty and in beauty and is beyond all human and earthly conceptions. Our stammering comment must not dim any of the glory. The great chorus declares the fact in two beautiful poetical lines: The kingship of the world became our Lord's and his Christ's; And he shall reign for the eons of the eons.[87]

The kingdom of the world is become ... Lenski translated the verb here "became" because it refers to an event already past in the vision. It happened in Revelation 11:1-13.

Those are undoubtedly right who perceive that these three series (seals, trumpets and bowls) are not consecutive, are not twenty-one successive chapters of world history, or of church history, but that each group of seven takes us over the same ground and shows us three groups of parallel scenes.[88]

The kingdom of our Lord, and of his Christ ... The use of the singular "kingdom" should be noted. It is not the "kingdoms" but the "kingdom" of the world that now belongs to the Lord. The time here is evidently that foretold in 1 Corinthians 15:24, when Christ shall have delivered up the kingdom to the Father; but this took nothing from Christ, who is still on the throne with the Father. Thus, the great heavenly chorus is not here celebrating the beginning of the reign of Christ, but in a sense, the end of it! The glorious and eternal extension of it in the everlasting state fuses it into God's eternal kingdom.

And he shall reign for ever and ever ... The "He" here is the Father and the Son; they are one, and that unity appears here.

Such observations as these, however, must not obscure the truth that this eternal reign of Christ is now going on in that glorious kingdom of Christ which began on Pentecost. "The reign of God began with the Incarnation (and related events) ... It is the reign of God through his anointed, the Messiah."[89] McDowell also viewed the subsequent vision of the birth of Christ (Revelation 12) as a proof of this.

[84] Frank L. Cox, op. cit., p. 76.

[85] Charles H. Roberson, op. cit., p. 77.

[86] G. B. Caird, op. cit., p. 141.

[87] R. C. H. Lenski, op. cit., p. 353.

[88] Ibid.

[89] Edward A. McDowell, The Meaning and Message of the Book of Revelation (Nashville: Broadman Press, 1951), p. 122.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-11.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the seventh angel sounded,.... The last of the seven angels, who had trumpets given them to sound, Revelation 8:2. The days of the voice of this angel, as in Revelation 10:7, cannot refer to the times of Constantine; for though there was then a strange turn of affairs in favour of the kingdom of Christ, when there was a great spread of the Gospel, and large conversions in many places, and many churches were raised and formed in several countries, and the whole empire became Christian; yet this, as we have seen, came to pass under the sixth seal, before any of the trumpets were sounded, and much less this seventh and last; nor do they belong to the times of the Reformation in Germany. Brightman fixes the sounding of this trumpet to the year 1558, when the kings of Sweden and Denmark set up the Gospel in their kingdoms, and reformed them from Popery; and when Queen Elizabeth came to the throne of England, and rooted out great part of the Romish superstition: but it is certain that this angel has not yet sounded his trumpet, and therefore cannot refer to anything past, but to what is to come; we are yet under the sixth trumpet; the outward court is not yet given to the Gentiles; the witnesses are not slain, and much less risen and ascended; the earthquake, the fall of the tenth part of the city, and the slaughter of seven thousand names of men, with what will follow thereon, are things yet to come; the Turkish woe is not over, and antichrist still reigns, and the kingdoms of this world are far from appearing to be the kingdoms of Christ. Some think, and indeed the generality of interpreters, that this respects the voice of the archangel, and trump of God, the last trump, which will sound at the resurrection of the dead, and the day of judgment; but none of these appear in the account of things under this trumpet; but rather the whole has a view to the spiritual reign of Christ, when both the eastern and western antichrist will be destroyed; the Gospel will be carried all over the world, and there will be large conversions both among Jews and Gentiles, and Christ will reign in a spiritual manner over all the earth. Hence it follows,

and there were great voices in heaven; these are either the voices of the angels in heaven, who rejoice at every appearance, and breaking forth of Christ's kingdom and glory, as in Revelation 5:11; and indeed, if they rejoice at the conversion of one sinner, at a single addition to Christ's interest, then much more will they, when the kingdoms of this world become his; or rather these may be the voices of the multitude of the saints in the churches, the same company with those in Revelation 19:1; who express their joy at the judgment of the great whore, and at the marriage of the Lamb; and who, as here, are attended with the thanksgivings and hallelujahs of the four and twenty elders: and it may be, that these are also the voices of the four living creatures, the ministers of the word, since the four and twenty elders generally follow them, Revelation 4:9; they may be the witnesses, who were silenced, but are now raised up, and are ascended into heaven, and their mouths are opened, and their voices heard again:

saying, the kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; by "the kingdoms of this world" are meant worldly kingdoms, which are set up by worldly power, and are supported by worldly policy, and subsist upon worldly principles and maxims; the government of which proceeds upon worldly ends and views; in distinction from the kingdom of Christ, which is not of this world, and is not supported by any such methods; and they are the kingdoms, into which the world is divided, which, and the glory of them, Satan showed to Christ, and insolently offered to give him them, if he would worship him; but these were to come to Christ in another way, and at another time. The Alexandrian copy, and some others, the Complutensian edition, the Vulgate Latin version, and all the Oriental versions, read in the singular number, "the kingdom of this world"; the whole government of it, which is his by right of nature, and will be overturned, and overturned again and again, till he comes, whose right it is; and then all power, rule, and authority, will be put down, and his kingdom, which will tilt the face of the whole earth, will take place: all the antichristian states and kingdoms are here intended, particularly the kingdoms into which the Roman empire, sometimes called the whole world, Luke 2:1, is divided, which are ten; one of the ten, a tenth part of the city or jurisdiction of Rome, will fall at the close of the sixth trumpet, and the other nine, or the other nine parts, will fall at the sounding of the seventh; the ten kings, that have given their kingdoms to the beast, will have an aversion to the whore, hate her, and burn her flesh, will fall off from her, and into the hands of Christ; there will be a general and thorough reformation from Popery in all the kingdoms of the Roman empire: but though these are greatly intended, yet not only they, but the Mahometan nations also, as the Turkish woe will now be over, and the great river Euphrates dried up, to make way for the kings of the east, those large kingdoms and countries of China, Tartary, and Persia; and these now under the power of the Turk will embrace the Christian faith; and also all the Pagan nations are to be taken into the account, and who will now enjoy the light of the Gospel: and all, and everyone those Pagan, Papal, and Mahometan kingdoms, will "become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ"; by "our Lord" may be designed God the Father, who is the Lord of the whole earth, the Lord God Almighty, and is acknowledged as such by angels and men; and by "his Christ", his Son Jesus Christ, who is equal with him; and what belongs to the one belongs to the other; and who, as Mediator, is his anointed One; anointed to be prophet, priest, and King; anointed with the oil of gladness, the Holy Ghost; see Psalm 2:2, where the same distinction is. In the Targum on Isaiah 4:2 mention is made of משוחא דיי, "the Messiah"; or "Christ of Jehovah": and in the same Targum on Isaiah 53:10, it is said, "they shall look" במלכות משיחהזן, "upon the kingdom of their Messiah"; though it may be rather that Christ is designed by both these phrases, and the words be rendered, "our Lord, even his Christ"; since the phrase, "our Lord", as well as Christ, is generally understood of Jesus Christ in the New Testament; and who is Lord of all, of angels, and of men, and the Christ of God. Now these kingdoms will become his, not merely by right, for so they are his already, by right of nature, and creation, and preservation; but these have shaken off his government, and have refused to have him to reign over them, and have fallen into the hands of usurpers, as Satan, the god of this world, the Romish antichrist, that reigns over the kings of the earth, and Mahomet the king of the locusts; but now these will, in fact, come into his hands, and be under his government; they will acknowledge him as their Lord and Sovereign, and fear and worship him, as King of saints: and this will be brought about, not by force of arms, as Mahomet got his dominions; nor by policy and fraud, by imposture and lying wonders, by which the pope of Rome has obtained his authority over the nations; but partly by the pouring out of the vials of God's wrath upon the seat of the beast, and upon the river Euphrates, that is, both upon the pope and Turk, which will weaken and destroy their power and authority, and make way for Christ to set up his kingdom; and partly, and chiefly, by the preaching of the Gospel: now will an open door be set, which none can shut; many will run to and fro, and knowledge will be increased; the earth will be covered with it, as the sea with waters; multitudes of souls everywhere will be converted; a nation will be born at once; churches will be set up in every place, which are Christ's kingdom, where he reigns, and where his subjects are, and his laws are put in execution; where his word will be now faithfully preached, his ordinances purely administered, and he, in his person, office, and grace, will be alone exalted: the consequence of which will be,

and he shall reign for ever and ever; no usurper will ever start up more, or obtain, neither Satan, nor the beast, nor the false prophet, shall ever regain their power and authority any more; neither Paganism, nor Judaism, nor antichristianism, either Papal or Mahometan, shall ever have place more: Christ will reign in this spiritual way, more or less, until he comes personally, and then he will reign with his people on earth a thousand years; and when they are ended, he will reign with them in heaven to all eternity; for though, at the end of these years, he shall deliver up the kingdom to the Father, yet he will not cease to reign; indeed he will not reign in the same manner, but he will reign with equal power and authority, and over, and with the same persons. The Vulgate Latin version adds, "Amen".

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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-11.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

27 And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying, 28 The kingdoms of this world are become [the kingdoms] of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever.

(27) Of whose sounding the trumpet Christ expressly foretold in (Revelation 10:7) and this is the second part of this chapter, containing a general history of the Christian Church, from the time of Boniface to the consummation of the victory declared by voice from heaven. In this history there are three branches: a preparation by the sound of the angels trumpet: a narration by the voice of heavenly angels and elders and a confirmation by sign.

(28) The narration has two parts: an acclamation of the heavenly creatures in this verse, and both an adoration by all the elders in (Revelation 11:16) and also a thanksgiving in (Revelation 11:17-18). The sense of the acclamation is, "Now the Lord has entered his kingdom and has restored his church in which most mightily recovered from the profanation of the Gentiles, he may glorify himself." Namely that, which the Lord ordained when he first ordained his Church, that the faith of the saints does now behold as accomplished.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-11.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

sounded — with his trumpet. Evidently “the LAST trumpet.” Six is close to seven, but does not reach it. The world judgments are complete in six, but by the fulfillment of seven the world kingdoms become Christ‘s. Six is the number of the world given over to judgment. It is half of twelve, the Church‘s number, as three and a half is half of seven, the divine number for completeness. Bengel thinks the angel here to have been Gabriel, which name is compounded of {(El}, God, and {(Geber}, MIGHTY MAN (Revelation 10:1). Gabriel therefore appropriately announced to Mary the advent of the mighty God-man: compare the account of the man-child‘s birth which follows (Revelation 12:1-6), to which this forms the transition though the seventh trumpet in time is subsequent, being the consummation of the historical episode, the twelfth and thirteen chapters. The seventh trumpet, like the seventh seal and seventh vial, being the consummation, is accompanied differently from the preceding six: not the consequences which follow on earth, but those IN HEAVEN, are set before us, the great voices and thanksgiving of the twenty-four elders in heaven, as the half-hour‘s silence in heaven at the seventh seal, and the voice out of the temple in heaven,It is done,” at the seventh vial. This is parallel to Daniel 2:44, “The God of heaven shall set up a kingdom, which shall never be destroyed: and the kingdom shall not be left to other people, but it shall break to pieces all these kingdoms, and it shall stand for ever.” It is the setting up of Heaven‘s sovereignty over the earth visibly, which, when invisibly exercised, was rejected by the earthly rulers heretofore. The distinction of worldly and spiritual shall then cease. There will be no beast in opposition to the woman. Poetry, art, science, and social life will be at once worldly and Christian.

kingdoms — A, B, C, and Vulgate read the singular, “The kingdom (sovereignty) of (over) the world is our Lord‘s and His Christ‘s.” There is no good authority for English Version reading. The kingdoms of the world give way to the kingdom of (over) the world exercised by Christ. The earth-kingdoms are many: His shall be one. The appellation “Christ,” the Anointed, is here, where His kingdom is mentioned appropriately for the first time used in Revelation. For it is equivalent to KING. Though priests and prophets also were anointed, yet this term is peculiarly applied to Him as King, insomuch that “the Lord&lsquo);s anointed” is His title as KING), in places where He is distinguished from the priests. The glorified Son of man shall rule mankind by His transfigured Church in heaven, and by His people Israel on earth: Israel shall be the priestly mediator of blessings to the whole world, realizing them first.

he — not emphatic in the Greek.

shall reign for ever and everGreek, “unto the ages of the ages.” Here begins the millennial reign, the consummation of “the mystery of God” (Revelation 10:7).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-11.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

There followed (εγενοντοegenonto). “There came to pass.” There was silence in heaven upon the opening of the seventh seal (Revelation 8:1), but here “great voices.” Perhaps the great voices are the ζωαzōa of Revelation 4:6.; Revelation 5:8.

Saying (λεγοντεςlegontes). Construction according to sense; λεγοντεςlegontes masculine participle (not λεγουσαιlegousai), though πωναιphōnai feminine. John understood what was said.

Is become (εγενετοegeneto). “Did become,” prophetic use of the aorist participle, already a fact. See εγενετοegeneto in Luke 19:9.

The kingdom of our Lord and of his Christ (του κυριου ημων και του Χριστου αυτουtou kuriou hēmōn kai tou Christou autou). Repeat η βασιλειαhē basileia from the preceding. God the Father is meant here by κυριουkuriou (Lord), as αυτουautou (his) shows. This is the certain and glorious outcome of the age-long struggle against Satan, who wields the kingdom of the world which he offered to Christ on the mountain for one act of worship. But Jesus scorned partnership with Satan in the rule of the world, and chose war, war up to the hilt and to the end. Now the climax has come with Christ as Conqueror of the kingdom of this world for his Father. This is the crowning lesson of the Apocalypse.

He shall reign (βασιλευσειbasileusei). Future active of βασιλευωbasileuō God shall reign, but the rule of God and of Christ is one as the kingdom is one (1 Corinthians 15:27). Jesus is the Lord‘s Anointed (Luke 2:26; Luke 9:20).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-11.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

The kingdoms - are become ( ἐγένοντο αἱ βασιλεῖαι )

Read ἐγένετο ἡ βασιλεία, thekingdom - is become.

Of our Lord, etc.

Compare Psalm 2:2-9.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-11.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever.

And the seventh angel sounded — This trumpet contains the most important and joyful events, and renders all the former trumpets matter of joy to all the inhabitants of heaven. The allusion therefore in this and all the trumpets is to those used in festal solemnities. All these seven trumpets were heard in heaven: perhaps the seventh shall once be heard on earth also, 1 Thessalonians 4:16.

And there were great voices — From the several citizens of heaven. At the opening of the seventh seal "there was silence in heaven;" at the sounding of the seventh trumpet, great voices. This alone is sufficient to show that the seven seals and seven trumpets do not run parallel to each other. As soon as the seventh angel sounds, the kingdom falls to God and his Christ. This immediately appears in heaven, and is there celebrated with joyful praise. But on earth several dreadful occurrences are to appear first. This trumpet comprises all that follows from these voices to Revelation 22:5.

The kingdom of the world — That is, the royal government over the whole world, and all its kingdoms, Zechariah 14:9.

Is become the kingdom of the Lord — This province has been in the enemy's hands: it now returns to its rightful Master. In the Old Testament, from Moses to Samuel, God himself was the King of his own people. And the same will be in the New Testament: he will himself reign over the Israel of God.

And of his Christ — This appellation is now first given him, since the introduction of the book, on the mention of the kingdom devolving upon him, under the seventh trumpet. Prophets and priests were anointed, but more especially kings: whence that term, the anointed, is applied only to a king. Accordingly, whenever the Messiah is mentioned in scripture, his kingdom is implied.

Is become — In reality, all things (and so the kingdom of the world) are God's in all ages: yet Satan and the present world, with its kings and lords, are risen against the Lord and against his Anointed. God now puts an end to this monstrous rebellion, and maintains his right to all things. And this appears in an entirely new manner, as soon as the seventh angel sounds.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-11.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

angel (See Scofield "Hebrews 1:4").

world kosmos = world-system. John 7:7

(See Scofield "Revelation 13:8").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Revelation 11:15". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/revelation-11.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

GOD’S JUST CLAIM

‘The kingdom of the world is become the kingdom of our Lord, and of His Christ: and He shall reign for ever and ever.’

Revelation 11:15 (R.V.)

This is a just claim which God makes. He asks no more than His rights when He demands that His sovereignty should be universal. It is a just claim for many reasons.

I. Because the world is God’s world—‘All souls are Mine.’ ‘In Him we live and move and have our being.’ It is not strange then that He should ask the allegiance of all.

II. Because the glory of God is the end of all created things, and specially of man.—‘For Thy glory they are, and were created.’

III. Because God’s honour is involved in the claim.—God, the King of kings, is pictured by the prophet as pleading with His chosen people in their forgetfulness of Him: ‘If I be a King, where is Mine honour?’

IV. Because God loves this world of men, not some only, but each and all of them.

—Bishop C. J. Ridgeway.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/revelation-11.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

15 And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever.

Ver. 15. Great voices in heaven] i.e. Great joy and triumph in the Church militant.

Are become the kingdoms] They have renounced Popery, given up their names to the gospel, and received the Reformation.

For ever and ever] Not for a thousand years only, as the millenaries hold.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-11.html. 1865-1868.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 11:15. ἐγένοντο φωναὶ μεγ., κ. τ. λ. To whom these voices belonged, is neither to be asked nor to be answered. Ewald wants to ascribe them to the four beasts;(2961) De Wette, to the angels; Beng., to various dwellers in heaven, angels and men. Hengstenb. tries to show that the innumerable hosts, Revelation 7:9 sq., are to be understood. This is incorrect, because the hosts which John there sees proleptically in heaven do not as yet correspond in Revelation 11:15, with the progressive course of the visions, but are not actually in heaven until Revelation 15:2 sqq.(2962) Also in Revelation 11:15-19 Hengstenb. mistakes the proleptical reference correctly understood by C. a Lap., Beng., Ew., De Wette, etc., by regarding all the contents of the seventh trumpet (the third woe) exhausted already with Revelation 11:19. Still more preposterously, Ebrard limits the seventh trumpet to Revelation 11:15-18.(2963)

ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ, where John is not as yet,(2964) but whither the look of the seer is directed.(2965)

λέγοντες. Cf. Revelation 4:8, Revelation 5:13. βασιλεία τοῦ κόσ΄ου. The regal dominion over the world.(2966) Instead of the obj. gen., in Revelation 17:18, ἐπί follows. Cf. also Revelation 1:6, Revelation 12:10. The immediately following καὶ βασιλεύσει presupposes not only the active idea of βασιλεία, but also this reading. Incorrectly, Luther, according to the var. supported by Ew. ii., ἐγένοντο αἱ βασιλεῖαι: the kingdoms of this world.

The proleptical(2967) in the songs of the heavenly voices lies in this, that immediately after the sound of the trumpet, and yet before any thing else has actually occurred of what is afterwards celebrated with similar songs of praise,(2968) they say, ἐγένετο βασ., κ. τ. λ.(2969) In reality the dominion over the world does not become God’s and that of his Anointed until the wrathful judgment described, viz., until ch. 18, yea, in another respect until Revelation 20:10, has actually dislodged from its assumed dominion all ungodly and antichristian power, which, by its rebellion(2970) against the only King and Lord, had usurped, to an extent, a part of his βασιλεία. The inner justification of the prolepsis—which Hengstenb. acknowledges only at Revelation 11:15-18 in the relation to Revelation 11:19, where he finds the final judgment—lies in the fact that the seventh trumpet has already actually sounded; that one, therefore, from which the real fulfilment of the mystery of God will infallibly proceed.(2971) But even if only a special series of further visions leads to that final consummation, yet the prospective celebration of that glorious result, especially in the mouth of the dwellers in heaven, has, after the sounding of the seventh trumpet, its full justification and beautiful significance; the allusion, however, in connection with this, to redemption, as the proper root of the fact here celebrated,(2972) is entirely out of place.

τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν καὶ τοῦ χριστοῦ αὐτοῦ. Not only the expression,(2973) but also the idea, points back to Psalms 2:2, for the Lord’s Anointed is the Son of God because of the βασιλεία, which is taken in general, indeed, from the nations,(2974) yet only for their destruction.

The ἡμῶν with τ. κυρίου does not give here a statement strange in itself concerning the co-regency of the saints,(2975) but corresponds, as also Revelation 12:10, Revelation 19:1, Revelation 5:6, to the joy of those who now behold their Lord and God, whom they themselves serve, in his victorious dominion over the judged world.

κ. βασιλεύσει εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τ. αἰών. For, after his overthrow of all powers opposed to God, no new enemy could arise. The subj. to βασιλεύσει is κύριος ἡμῶν;(2976) but his Christ is manifestly understood as partner of this βασιλεία.(2977)

ἐβασίλευσας

ἦλθεν.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/revelation-11.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 11:15. (114) ἓβδο΄ος, the seventh) The principal trumpet is that of the seventh angel. This closely approached the very times of the apostles: but it was about to have a long continuance. The near approach of the events, which were about to follow in it, were often viewed by the apostles separately, and held forth by them to the view of the faithful: but in consequence of the length of the interval, scoffers denied the end itself, in which the course of the events was about to issue; while the faithful did not fully comprehend the long continuance of the interval. Each class furnished the apostles with a reason for explaining the mystery more fully: 2 Peter 3:2; 2 Thessalonians 2.

Whether Gabriel is the angel here meant, we propose in the German Exegesis as a subject of consideration for the reader. And the very name גבריאל agrees; for אל is God, and גבר a man, strong. Therefore that name exhibits the sum of the message to Mary, Luke 1:31; Luke 1:35; and here of the commencement of the trumpet in heaven: for, ch. Revelation 12:5, there is born υἱὸς ἄῤῥην; that is, אל גבור, Isaiah 9:5. I give no definition; I make no conjecture; I only inquire. But that which follows I affirm: This trumpet is the most important of all, which both of itself has here a most joyful meaning, and renders joyful all the trumpets of the former angels, but only to the inhabitants of heaven. Wherefore they are not to be heard, who here prefer to interpret sorrowful trumpets, used by the Jews in excommunication, rather than festive trumpets. The injury arising from the abuse of Jewish antiquities, in the explanation of the New Testament, and especially of the Apocalypse, is greater than the advantage arising from the use of the same. Truth is learned from the very clearness of the text, containing its own αὐτάρκειαν (self-dependent completeness); the abuse introduces errors. We see other examples on ch. Revelation 13:18 (Annot. ii. § 2), and on ch. Revelation 14:20, Revelation 17:9, note 1. It would be better not to have recourse to the books of the Jews, if no better reward for the labour could be carried off from them.— ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ, in heaven) This is strictly parallel with that passage of Daniel 2:44, “IN the days of those kings (not, after they shall be destroyed), the God OF HEAVEN shall set up a kingdom.” He is called the God of heaven, as showing His majesty in heaven. Comp. altogether Revelation 11:13, note. Afterwards the action descends to the earth. See shortly afterwards concerning the kingdom of the world.— λέγοντες) See App. Ed. ii. So ch. Revelation 4:1. Many read, φωνὴ λέγων.(115) See also ch. Revelation 5:12, and the remarks which we have made above on ch. Revelation 9:13-14, and Wolf’s remarks on Revelation 14:7, Revelation 19:1. Dionysius of Alexandria thus expressed his opinion respecting the writer of the Apocalypse, not 200 years afterwards: διάλεκτον ΄έντοι καὶ γλῶσσαν οὐκ ἀκριβῶς ἑλληνίζουσαν αὐτοῦ βλέπω, ἀλλʼ ἰδιώ΄ασι ΄ὲν βαρβαρικοῖς χρώ΄ενον, καί που καὶ σολοικίζοντα. But, says Lightfoot, he forms this judgment concerning dialect and phraseology, who was acquainted with neither, and he censures as a fault that which chiefly commends this book. For John θεοδίδακτος (being taught of God), everywhere in his Apocalypse assumed the style of the Old Testament: while this man, who was ignorant of the Hebrew language, reckoned as a SOLECISM the whole of that, which was THE DIALECT OF GOD, and believed that that which he could not understand was barbarous.—Op. Posth. f. 145. But yet the readings of the Apocalypse (which present the appearance of a solecism), as Dionysius demonstrates, are ancient, are repeated, and have an analogy to one another: but those which follow the ordinary syntax have been introduced by copyists, many ages after Dionysius.— ἐγένετο βασιλεία τοῦ κόσμου, the kingdom of the world is become) This reading of an early age is much more glorious than that of the hasty copyist, ἐγένοντο αἱ βασιλεῖαι,(116) κ. τ. λ. Blemishes of such a character, and of such importance, as I have noticed, ch. Revelation 1:18, Revelation 3:12, Revelation 5:14, Revelation 6:11, Revelation 11:2; Revelation 11:17, Revelation 14:1, Revelation 15:3, Revelation 17:8; Revelation 17:16, Revelation 20:4, Revelation 21:24, Revelation 22:19, etc., remain in those editions, which are eagerly reprinted the revision which applies a remedy to them (I do not complain on my own account) lies neglected. See Pref. § viii. Admon. 20. We return to the passage. The kingdoms of the world give way to the kingdom of the world. Thus Obadiah, Obadiah 1:21, and the Psalms repeatedly. Vitringa indeed correctly says, The fulfilment of this oracle is in vain sought in the time of Constantine: Anacr. Ap. p. 512; but at the same time he thinks that this prophecy will be fulfilled after the destruction of the beast. In both points D. Lange assents to him. Here a true analysis of the text is especially necessary: moreover we have presented such a one above, in the Introduction to the Apoc. Number 6. Many separate the natural sequence of ch. 11 and those which follow; but it vindicates itself. See Erkl. Offenb. p. 71 and following, 552, 564, etc. The third woe, which is set forth in ch. Revelation 12:12, and is described particularly in ch. 13, is long ago in course, of accomplishment: and from things present it is distinguished, what things are past under the trumpet of the seventh angel, and what are still future.— τοῦ κυρίου(117)) See App. Crit. Ed. ii. κυρίου is here used as a proper name (as Grotius and Le Buy admit), with which that which immediately follows, καὶ χριστοῦ αὐτοῦ, best agrees: for the expression is, the Lord’s Christ, משיה יהוה, not the Christ of OUR Lord. And thus in the Apocalypse the inhabitants of heaven say, God, Lord, our God, the Lord our God; but never, our Lord. Athanasius, in his Synopsis on this passage, and Rupertus, in his Comm. p. 308, were of the same opinion, if they did not retain the same reading.— καὶ τοῦ χριστοῦ αὐτοῦ, and of His Christ, or Anointed) This is the first appellation of Christ in this prophetic Treatise, after the Introduction of the book, namely, in the mention of the Kingdom under the trumpet of the seventh angel. For Christ is called a King antonomastically,(118) as Hiller observes, Syntagm. p. 356. Comp. Brent’s Homily xlii. on Acts, and Explan. of Catech. p. 114 and following, and p. 23. Elisha the prophet was anointed, 1 Kings 19:16; priests were anointed, Exodus 28:41; but with especial propriety, Kings. Whence the title of Anointed, put absolutely, denotes nothing but a king. The usual expression is, the Lord’s anointed, not the anointed king: but [in the case of the priest] the only expression used is, the priest that is anointed, by way of epithet: Leviticus 4:5. Nay, the Anointed is even expressly distinguished from the priest, 1 Samuel 2:35; Psalms 132:16-17. In the whole Evangelic history, the name, Christ, is never set forth under the title of priest; it very frequently is under the name of king. And moreover, as often as the Messiah is mentioned in the Scripture, there is a reference to his Kingdom. The priestly office and the prophetical also are both contained in the kingly (which by a metaphor is the meaning of Shepherd also: ch. Revelation 12:5). See Hebrews 2:17, note. Among the Gentiles also, one man has often borne the kingly office in addition to the priestly, sometimes under the title of priest, sometimes under that of king.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-11.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And the seventh angel sounded; the last of those angels mentioned Revelation 8:2.

And there were great voices in heaven, saying; St. John in his vision heard great acclamations and shoutings for the victory which Christ and his gospel had got over the beast.

The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever; so that a great part of the world, casting off the papacy, that new Gentilism, together with all their abominable idolatries and superstitions, embraced the truth of the gospel. Here ariseth a great question, whether the seven vials, of which we shall find the 16th chapter treating, {Revelation 16:1-21} do belong all to the seventh trumpet, or some of them belong to the sixth trumpet, of which mention hath been before made. Great divines are on both sides as to this question. Mr. Pool, in his Latin Synopsis, hath collected together their reasons, of which I shall give a short account, leaving my reader for a fuller satisfaction to the Latin Synopsis.

Those who think that the seven vials do all relate to the seventh trumpet, and contemporize with it, in defence of their opinion say:

1. That the seven seals, and the seven trumpets, and the seven vials, are all mentioned in the same form of speech; and therefore the seven vials are not to be divided, some to one trumpet, some to another.

2. Because the seventh trumpet and the seven vials are one and the same thing, nothing being revealed under the seven vials which doth not belong to the seventh trumpet; they agree in their titles of woes, in the nature of the revelations, in their objects, both the one and the other declaring the ruin of antichrist; both of them are mentioned as the last plagues to come upon the world before the last day.

3. All the vials are of the same nature, declaring but the judgments by which God, setting up the kingdom of Christ, would ruin antichrist; they only differ in the degrees of the plagues, each one rising higher than the other.

4. The seventh trumpet cannot declare the ruin of antichrist, unless the seven vials be poured out under it, for they show the means by which he must be destroyed.

5. The seventh trumpet soundeth immediately upon the slaying of the witnesses, and contemporizeth with the whole course of their renewed liberty, and therefore the period signified by it must be before the fall of antichrist, declared by the sixth vial.

6. The seventh trumpet soundeth immediately after the expiration of the twelve hundred and sixty days; before the end of which none of the vials were poured out.

Those who think that divers of the vials were poured out, or shall be poured out, before the sounding of this seventh trumpet, say, that the beast’s kingdom beginning to fall under the sixth trumpet, several of the vials, declaring the degrees of his falling, must belong to that. It appeareth by all we have in this chapter Revelation 11:7-15, that antichrist’s kingdom was in a great measure weakened under the sixth trumpet, particularly from Revelation 11:11-13. To which those who think that all the vials related to the seventh trumpet say, that they grant that there were some preparations to the final ruin of antichrist, during the period of the sixth trumpet, but the seven vials signify the further progress and perfection of his ruin, which falls under the period signified by the seventh trumpet. This being premised, I proceed with the text.

It is doubted here whether those words, are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ, be to be understood as being actually so, or now beginning to be so. Those who make the sense that they now actually were so, must understand the time to be the day of judgment, or some time next to it, and consequently must think that five at least of the seven vials, mentioned Revelation 16:1-21, belonged to the sixth trumpet. Those who make the sense, are beginning to become the kingdoms of the Lord, or shall shortly be so, may make all the seven vials to belong to the seventh trumpet. By becoming the kingdoms of the Lord Christ, he means in outward profession; so as antichrist shall reign no more, but they shall be ruled by the officers of the Lord Christ, until they be taken up to reign with him in glory.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-11.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

И седьмой Ангел вострубил Седьмая труба содержит 7 чаш, последний суд, описанный в 16-й главе, и все события, ведущие к установлению Тысячелетнего Царства (гл. 20) и увенчания Иисуса как Царя (гл. 19).

Царством Господа нашего и Христа Его Предпочтительнее читать «единственным царством». Несмотря на многочисленные политические и культурные деления, Библия рассматривает падший мир как одно царство с единственным правителем – сатаной (Ин. 12:31; 14:30; 16:11; 2Кор. 4:4). Следуя примеру сатаны, люди, стоящие у власти, обычно проявляют враждебность ко Христу (Пс. 2:2; Деян. 4:26). Длительный бунт мирового царства против Бога закончится победоносным возвращением Господа Иисуса Христа, Который победит Своих врагов и установит Свое Божье Царство (Ис. 2:2, 3; Дан. 2:44; 7:13, 14, 18, 22, 27; Лк. 1:31-33). Это Царство принадлежит также Богу Отцу (см. пояснения к Дан. 4:6; 6:26; 1Кор. 15:24).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-11.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Great voices in heaven; rejoicing over the rapid and triumphant spread of the gospel.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-11.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And the seventh angel sounded, and there followed great voices in Heaven, and they said, “The kingdom of the world is become the kingdom of our Lord and of His Christ, and He shall reign for ever and ever”.’

Thus is declared the final hour. This is the seventh and last trumpet (compare 1 Corinthians 15:52). The church is raptured, the king is crowned and will now immediately exert His authority and judge the world. ‘The kingdom of the world’ is now His. The kings of the earth, and the rulers, took counsel against the Lord and against His Christ (anointed one)’ (Psalms 2:2). But God could only laugh at their puny efforts (Psalms 2:4) and now He will ‘speak to them in His wrath and vex them with His sore displeasure’ (Psalms 2:5), having set His king on His holy hill of Zion (Revelation 2:6). The Lord now ‘sits as king for ever, He has prepared his throne for judgment’ (Psalms 8:7).

It would not have been possible in John’s earlier description of the rapture to include the sound of the trumpet, for there we had what those in Jerusalem heard and saw and there is no suggestion that the last trumpet would be heard by man. Man hears the voice from Heaven, but the trumpet sounds in Heaven declaring the final fulfilment of the purposes of God. John therefore now immediately introduces it to connect it with what has gone before.

The resurrection has been seen from earth’s point of view, now it is declared from Heaven’s point of view. The third woe is declared, the trumpet sounds, the dead are raised and the church is raptured, an example of which we have seen, and then, in that hour, the third woe actually comes, the judgment, which is carried out on those who dwell on earth. Then they will weep and gnash their teeth for they can no longer hide from His face.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/revelation-11.html. 2013.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

The seventh trumpet--11:15.

1. The seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven. The interlude was over. The seventh trumpet sounded the finish--the end of the tribulation period. It was the completion of the "mystery of God" which was "according to the good tidings" of the prophets, fulfilled in the fall of Judaism, the triumph of Christianity, the success of gospel, the victory of the church, and the expansion of the kingdom of Christ. The "great voices in heaven" were the combined voices of the vision united as one to proclaim the announcement of the seventh trumpet.

Before this it had been an angel or a voice but now it was all of the voices together in one great voice to announce the end of all events of the vision. The work, which had begun with the prophets (1 Peter 1:1-25 :1 O-12) and completed by the apostles, had triumphed over the powers of men, and the kingdoms of this world had become the kingdoms of our Lord and of his Christ. The dominion of earthly rule in the kingdoms of men could no longer overpower Christianity-- through their citizens they had become the kingdoms of our Lord (God), and of his Christ. This declaration depicted the conversion of the empire's citizens--the worldwide expansion of Christianity. It was the fulfillment of the words of Christ in Matthew 24:31 to send his angels with a great sound of trumpet, after the destruction of Jerusalem to gather together his elect from the four winds, from one end of the heaven to the other. With the fall of Jerusalem came the shaking down of all Jewish opposition to gospel.

Christianity was liberated from the fetters of Judaism and entered upon a worldwide career of leavening the civilizations of world by bringing them under the influence of Christ. Thus the kingdoms or dominions of men became the kingdoms of our Lord (God) and of his Christ. In Ephesians 5:5 the apostle designated it the kingdom of God and Christ, and declared in Colossians 1:13-14 that it was then present. But in the apocalypse, the trumpets, thunders and earthquakes were envisioned as shaking down opposition of all human dominion to give way to the "kingdom which cannot be shaken." (Hebrews 12:18-28) From the apostle's vantage point could be viewed the sites of Babylonia, Persia, Grecia and Rome, all of which were shaken, upon the ruins of which was to be firmly planted and forever established the kingdom that remains.

2. "And he shall reign forever and ever."

The seventh trumpet sounded the full sway of kingdom of Christ over all opposing forces--Jewish and Roman. From henceforth his elect were to be gathered "from the four winds, from one end of the heaven to the other" (Matthew 24:31) and the earth made full of the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea. (Isaiah 11:9; Habakkuk 2:14) It was the joining of prophecy and apocalypse in the delineation of the sway of the kingdom of Christ, fulfilled in the universal sweep of the gospel. And he shall reign forever and ever. In the "kingdom of our Lord and of his Christ" God shall reign forever--his dominion over all earthly kingdoms was established in the events resulting in triumph of the cause of his Christ. This reign refers to the everlasting dominion of God, which no human authority, governments or powers can ever dethrone.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-11.html. 1966.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

When the seventh angel sounded, loud voices in heaven announced that the long-expected reign of Jesus Christ over the world would begin soon ( Revelation 20:1-10; cf. Psalm 2:2; Isaiah 9:6-7; Ezekiel 21:26-27; Daniel 2:35; Daniel 2:44; Daniel 4:3; Daniel 6:26; Daniel 7:14; Daniel 7:26-27; Zechariah 14:9). "Has become" (Gr. egeneto) is proleptic. [Note: Dsterdieck, pp328-29; Robertson, 6:384.] This will happen after the seventh trumpet has run its course. [Note: Charles, 1:294; Kiddle, p207.] The loud voices probably belong to the whole host of heaven. "Lord" refers to God the Father.

"Jesus will return and assume the throne of His father David in this future crisis, at which time He will replace the satanically energized sovereignty of world rulers that has prevailed for so long. The whole theme of Revelation is the purging of evil from the world so that it can become the domain of the King of kings (cf. Revelation 19:16). Only a physical kingdom on earth will satisfy this." [Note: Thomas, Revelation 8-22, p106.]

"He" includes both the Father and His Christ. The earthly reign of Christ will continue in the new heaven and earth when Jesus will turn over control to the Father and "God will be all in all" ( Revelation 21:1 to Revelation 22:5; cf. Daniel 2:44; Daniel 7:14; Daniel 7:27; 1 Corinthians 15:24; 1 Corinthians 15:27-28).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-11.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 11:15. It is difficult to say to whom the great voices spoken of in this verse belong. They can hardly come from angels, or from the four living creatures, or indeed from any created thing. They seem rather a poetic method of giving expression to the fact that those counsels of the Almighty which had been long since taken, but which had been hitherto concealed from every eye but that of faith, were about to go into open execution.—The words uttered by the voices are, The kingdom of the world is become the possession of our Lord and of his Christ, and he shall reign for ever and ever. The word ‘kingdom’ used here is to be understood in the sense of ‘dominion over,’ and not in that of all the kingdoms of the world united into one. This dominion is celebrated as given to the Father in the Son and to the Son in the Father; and it shall be theirs for ever and ever, all its enemies being completely overthrown.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-11.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

The seventh Angel, &c. The saints and blessed spirits and heaven are represented praising God with loud voices, at the approaching of the kingdom of God; some understand at the end and consummation of the wicked world, after the destruction of antichrist, when the blessed shall reign in heaven: but others expound this of the triumph of the Christian faith and Church, when the providence of God putting an end to the persecutions against the Christian religion, by the miserable end of Dioclesian, Maximian, Maxentius, &c., made the kingdom of this world (the powerful Roman empire) become the kingdom of our Lord, by his raising Constantine the great to the empire, and under him making the faith of Christ triumph over all its persecutors and adversaries. (Witham)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-11.html. 1859.

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

As noted in verse 12, this will take place at the end of time. The vision has reached the end once to reassure Christians being persecuted. We will view the same span of time from a different perspective in the coming chapters. No matter how hopeless things may seem in that narration, we can rest easy because we have seen the end. The voices here may well be those of the redeemed who have now been taken up into heaven. (Verses 11-12)

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Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/revelation-11.html. 2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

seventh angel. This seventh trumpet embraces the seven vials, or last seven plagues, which make up the third woe, and reaches on to Revelation 18:24, if not Revelation 20:15.

were. Literally came to be.

kingdoms. The texts read "kingdom", i.e. sovereignty.

world. App-129.

are = is.

Christ. App-98.

He . . . ever. See Exodus 15:18. Psalms 146:10.

for . . . ever. See Revelation 1:6.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-11.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever.

Sounded - with his trumpet: 'the LAST trumpet.' Six is close to seven, but does not reach it. The world-judgments are complete in six; but by the seven, the world-kingdoms become Christ's. Six marks the world given over to judgment. It is half of twelve, the Church's number, as three and a half is half of seven, the divine number. [Bengel thinks the angel Gabriel, compounded of 'Eel (Hebrew #410), GOD, and geber (Hebrew #1397), MIGHTY MAN (Revelation 10:1).] Gabriel appropriately announced to Mary the advent of the mighty God-man (Isaiah 9:6 : cf. the man-child's birth which follows, Revelation 12:1-6), to which this forms the transition, though the seventh trumpet in time is subsequent, being the consummation of the historical episode, (Revelation 12:1-17 and Revelation 13:1-18.) The seventh trumpet, like the seventh seal and seventh vial, being the consummation, is accompanied differently from the preceding six: not the consequences on earth, but those IN HEAVEN, are described, the great voices and thanksgiving of the 24 elders in heaven, as the half-hour's silence in heaven at the seventh seal, and the voice out of the temple in heaven, "It is done," at the seventh vial. Parallel to Daniel 2:44, 'the God of heaven shall set up a kingdom, which shall break to pieces all these kingdoms, and it shall stand forever:' the setting up of heaven's sovereignty over the earth visibly, which, heretofore invisibly exercised, was rejected by earthly rulers. There will then be no beast in opposition to the woman. Poetry, art, science, and social life will be at once worldly and Christian.

Kingdoms. 'Aleph (') A B C, Vulgate, singular, 'the kingdom (sovereignty) of (over) the world is our Lord's, and His Christ's.' The kingdoms of the world give way to Christ's kingdom of (over) the world. The earth-kingdoms are many: His shall be one. "Christ," the Anointed, here, where His kingdom is mentioned, is appropriately for the first time used in Revelation: for it is equivalent to KING. Though priests and prophets also were anointed, yet it is peculiarly applied to Him as King, insomuch that "the Lord's anointed" is His title, in places where He is distinguished from the priests. The glorified Son of man shall rule mankind by His transfigured Church in heaven, and by His people Israel on earth; Israel shall be priestly mediator of blessings to the world, realizing them first herself (Exodus 19:6).

He - not emphatic.

Shall reign forever and ever - `unto the ages of the ages.' Here begins the millennial reign, the consummation of "the mystery of God" (Revelation 10:7).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-11.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

THE SEVENTH TRUMPET—THE LAST WOE TRUMPET.

(15) And the seventh angel . . .—Better, And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in the heaven (persons) saying, The kingdom of the world is become (the possession) of our Lord, and of His Christ, and He shall reign to the ages of ages. The literal translation is, The kingdom of the world is become our Lord’s, and of His Christ. As far as the expression “our Lord’s” is concerned, there is no need that any word, such as kingdom or possession, should be supplied, but the additional phrase “of His Christ” creates an awkwardness, and the word “possession,” or inheritance, may not inappropriately be used from the Psalm which foretells this final establishment of the kingdom of the anointed Messiah, the Christ of God. “Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession” (Psalms 2:8). It is the kingdom—not, as in the English version, “the kingdoms”—of the world which has become Christ’s possession. The contest is not for the kingdoms, the separate nationalities: the varying political systems might exist, as far as mere organisation is concerned, under the rule of Christ; the contest is for the kingdom of the world. Satan was willing to surrender the kingdoms of the world to our Lord on condition of a homage which would have left him still in possession of the kingdom of the world. But now the close of the contest is the overthrow of the kingdom of evil, the establishment of the kingdom of good: that is, of God; and He shall reign for ever and ever. Dean Alford pointed out that our familiarity with the “Hallelujah Chorus” tempted us to put an emphasis on the word He which is not sanctioned by the Greek; it is the reign of the Lord which is the prominent thought. The reign is unto the ages of ages. Surely this means always. We are not told whose voices sing this chorus; it is just the tumultuous sound of heavenly voices, growing into natural and irresistible chorus as the trumpet heralds the approach of the glorious end.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-11.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever.
the seventh
8:2-6,12; 9:1,13; 10:7
and there
12:10; 16:17; 19:6; Isaiah 27:13; 44:23; Luke 15:6,10
The kingdoms
12:10; 15:4; 17:14; 20:4; Psalms 22:27,28; 72:11; 86:9; 89:15-17; Isaiah 2:2,3; 49:6,7,22,23; 55:5; 60:3-14; Jeremiah 16:19; Daniel 2:44,45; Daniel 7:14,18,22,27; Hosea 2:23; Amos 9:11,12; Micah 4:1,2; Zephaniah 3:9,10; Zechariah 2:11; 8:20-23; 14:9; Malachi 1:11
and he
Exodus 15:18; Psalms 110:4; 146:10; Isaiah 9:7; Ezekiel 37:25; Daniel 2:44; 7:14,18,27; Micah 4:7; Matthew 6:13; Luke 1:33; Hebrews 1:8
Reciprocal: Genesis 22:17 - thy seed;  Genesis 49:8 - thy hand;  Genesis 49:10 - the gathering;  Numbers 24:7 - his kingdom;  Numbers 24:17 - Sheth;  2 Samuel 5:17 - But when;  2 Samuel 7:16 - General2 Samuel 22:44 - head;  2 Samuel 22:51 - seed;  1 Kings 1:40 - rejoiced;  1 Kings 8:43 - General1 Chronicles 14:8 - all the Philistines;  1 Chronicles 16:30 - before him;  1 Chronicles 17:12 - I will;  1 Chronicles 29:11 - thine is the;  2 Chronicles 6:33 - that all people;  Psalm 18:43 - a people;  Psalm 47:5 - sound;  Psalm 47:7 - King;  Psalm 65:2 - unto thee;  Psalm 67:4 - govern;  Psalm 68:33 - his voice;  Psalm 71:21 - increase;  Psalm 72:5 - as long;  Psalm 72:8 - He shall;  Psalm 82:8 - thou;  Psalm 89:25 - I will;  Psalm 93:1 - Lord;  Psalm 96:10 - the Lord;  Psalm 102:13 - the set;  Psalm 102:15 - GeneralPsalm 113:3 - GeneralPsalm 126:2 - Then was;  Psalm 132:18 - but upon;  Psalm 138:4 - All the kings;  Psalm 145:11 - the glory;  Psalm 145:13 - kingdom;  Proverbs 29:2 - the righteous;  Song of Solomon 2:11 - GeneralIsaiah 12:5 - this is known;  Isaiah 24:23 - when;  Isaiah 25:3 - GeneralIsaiah 26:15 - thou art;  Isaiah 27:6 - GeneralIsaiah 29:23 - sanctify;  Isaiah 37:16 - thou art;  Isaiah 40:2 - warfare;  Isaiah 49:12 - these shall;  Isaiah 52:7 - Thy God;  Isaiah 52:10 - made;  Isaiah 54:5 - The God;  Isaiah 59:19 - shall they;  Isaiah 60:15 - thou;  Isaiah 62:7 - till he make;  Isaiah 65:18 - GeneralIsaiah 66:18 - that I;  Jeremiah 10:7 - O King;  Ezekiel 17:23 - under;  Ezekiel 37:22 - and one;  Ezekiel 47:5 - waters to swim in;  Daniel 2:34 - a stone;  Daniel 2:35 - and filled;  Daniel 4:3 - his kingdom;  Daniel 4:34 - whose;  Daniel 6:26 - and his kingdom;  Daniel 8:14 - then;  Daniel 12:7 - that it;  Obadiah 1:21 - and the;  Micah 5:4 - shall he be great;  Habakkuk 2:14 - the earth;  Zephaniah 2:11 - and men;  Haggai 2:22 - overthrow;  Zechariah 9:10 - his dominion;  Zechariah 14:6 - not;  Zechariah 14:7 - at;  Zechariah 14:16 - that every;  Malachi 4:3 - tread down;  Matthew 2:6 - a Governor;  Matthew 4:8 - and showeth;  Matthew 6:10 - Thy kingdom;  Matthew 13:32 - the least;  Matthew 16:18 - shall not;  Matthew 28:18 - All;  Mark 4:31 - is less than;  Luke 11:2 - Thy kingdom;  Luke 13:19 - and it;  John 3:30 - must increase;  Acts 4:26 - against his;  Romans 11:12 - their;  Romans 11:25 - until;  Galatians 3:8 - In;  Philippians 2:9 - God;  Colossians 1:18 - in all;  Hebrews 2:5 - the world;  Hebrews 12:27 - signifieth;  Revelation 1:5 - and the prince;  Revelation 6:2 - and he went;  Revelation 7:9 - no man;  Revelation 11:17 - thou hast;  Revelation 11:19 - and there were;  Revelation 14:2 - a voice;  Revelation 14:11 - for;  Revelation 14:13 - a voice;  Revelation 19:1 - I heard;  Revelation 19:4 - the four;  Revelation 20:5 - This;  Revelation 22:5 - and they

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-11.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Kingdoms of the world are not asked to become part of the kingdom of Christ. That would be virtually another union of church and state. What happened was a change in the attitude of the earthly kingdoms. Before the Reformation the kings on those thrones could not reign as Christ would have wished them to and as they personally would have been inclined. They had to take their instructions from Rome and rule their subjects as that head dictated. After the delusion was lifted by the insight into the scriptures that was afforded them through the work of the reformers, they learned that they could permit their subjects to regulate their own religious life as they believed Christ wished them to. It is in that sense that the kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord. Such a revolution was a woe to the "man of sin" in Rome for it meant the end of his arrogant rule. It is the third woe already predicted and now announced by the sounding of the seventh angel. He shall reign for ever and ever. Christ never ceased to be a king from the time He ascended to his Father"s right hand ( 1 Peter 3:22), and will continue to be king until the time of His second coming ( 1 Corinthians 15:24-25). But He was not recognized as king by these earthly rulers while they were under the control of Rome.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-11.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 11:15

Romans 11:15 And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever.

In this verse, and the verses following, to the end of this chapter, are contained, first, a publication of glad tidings, by a great voice from heaven upon the seventh angel's beginning to sound,

Saying, the kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ, and he shall reign forever and ever.

Secondly, a doxology and thanksgiving unto Christ by the twenty four elders, for taking unto him his great power, and setting up his kingly government. { Revelation 11:16-17} Thirdly, the effects of God's setting up Christ's Kingdom on earth. { Revelation 11:18} And the nations were angry. The heathen rage; the kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together against the Lord, and against his Christ { Psalm 2:1-3} etc. XXXX LXX XXXX Amplified, first, by the wrath of Christ, against his and his people enemies, unto their destruction { Revelation 11:18} and thy wrath is come. Secondly, the time of the dead, that they should be judged, all the saints rewarded, and the wicked destroyed. { Revelation 11:18} Thirdly, and the temple of God opened. { Revelation 11:19} And the ark of his covenant seen in his temple: whence proceedeth a dreadful and terrible tempest of lightnings, thunders and voices. { Revelation 11:19}

And the seventh angel sounded.

This seventh angel is the angel that is to sound the third woe trumpet { Revelation 8:13} which third woe will come quickly after the second woe is past; to wit, the seven vials full of the seven last plagues. { Revelation 21:9} For in them is filled up the wrath of God { Revelation 15:1} to be poured out without mixture (of any mercy) into the cup of his indignation; which wine of the wrath of God, mystical Babylon, and every one that (then) shall worship the beast, and his image, and receive his mark in his forehead, or in his hand, shall drink, and shall be tormented forever and ever. { Revelation 14:8-11; Revelation 16:10-19; Revelation 18:2; Revelation 18:8; Revelation 18:21}

As it was dangerous to worship the beast or his image when HE was rising; so it will be damnable to worship him or his image, when HE is falling. { Revelation 18:2-19; Revelation 19:19-21; Revelation 14:8-11}

And there were great voices in heaven, saying

This public declaration of the glad tidings, our Lord Jesus Christ revealed to his servant John, by way of anticipation for the comfort of his churches, ministers, and saints. { Revelation 17:1; Revelation 21:9} By voices from heaven is meant his ministering spirits sent forth by Christ to minister for them, who shall be heirs of salvation { Hebrews 1:14} so that the doctrine of Christ's Kingdom hath heaven's authority for it, touching which, here are two principal things asserted by these voices from heaven; viz. two heavenly truths. First, that the kingdoms of this world are become the Kingdom of Christ. Secondly, that HE shall reign forever and ever.

The kingdoms of this world are become the Kingdom of our Lord, and of his Christ.

Are, that Isaiah, shall be, when the seventh angel soundeth; as { Revelation 14:8; Revelation 18:2} Babylon is fallen, that Isaiah, shall fall when God judgeth her. { Revelation 18:8} By the kingdom of this world we may understand, first, the Kingdom of David {Luke 1:30-33} to wit, Judah, and Israel. { Micah 4:8} And thou O tower of the flock, the strong hold of the Daughter of Zion, unto thee shall it come, EVEN THE FIRST DOMINION. The Kingdom shall come to the daughters of Jerusalem { Micah 4:7} and the Lord shall reign over them in Mount Zion, from henceforth even forever. Read Zechariah 12:7. Secondly, the kingdoms of the Roman Caesars, which the fourth monarchy { Daniel 2:40-44} And in the days of these kings shall the God of heaven set up a kingdom, which shall never be destroyed, etc, that Isaiah, the fifth monarchy; viz. the Kingdom of Christ. Lastly, all the kingdoms on the earth { Daniel 7:13-14} And there was given unto him dominion and glory, and a kingdom, that all people, nations and languages, should serve him: His dominion is an everlasting dominion, and his Kingdom, that which shall not be destroyed { Zechariah 14:9} And the Lord shall be King over all the earth: In that day (viz. one day known to JEHOVAH) { Zechariah 14:7} shall there be one Lord, and his name one { Psalm 2:6-8} and. { Daniel 7:27} These prophecies have not yet been fulfilled, but they shall be fulfilled to a tittle. { Matthew 5:17-18}

The kingdoms of this world shall become the Kingdom of Christ.

First, by preaching the gospel of the kingdom in all the world, for a witness to all nations. { Matthew 24:14-30; Revelation 14:6-14} Secondly, by pouring out the spirit upon all flesh. { Joel 2:28-29} By which dispensation of grace, the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea. { Habakkuk 2:14} And in his temple (when that is opened) { Revelation 15:5} shall every one speak of his Glory { Psalm 29:9-10} The Lord sitteth King forever. And then will the saints bless him. They shall speak of the glory of thy kingdom, and talk of thy power, to make known to the sons of men-the glorious majesty of his Kingdom. { Psalm 145:1-13} Thirdly, by breaking the kingdoms of this world to pieces { Daniel 2:34-44} Thou sawest till that a stone was cut out without hands. It shall break in pieces, and consume all these kingdoms, etc. And that after this manner; viz. first, God will make Jerusalem (that Isaiah, his church and people) a burdensome stone for all people; all that burden themselves with it shall be cut in pieces. { Zechariah 12:3} Secondly, the beast and the kings of the earth, and their armies, will fall upon the chief cornerstone (which God hath laid in Zion) { 1 Peter 2:6} namely, Jesus Christ { Ephesians 2:20-21} And afterwards that stone will fall upon them, by whom they shall be broken in pieces, and grinded to powder. Read and compare those scriptures for proof hereof. { Matthew 21:42-44; Revelation 17:13-17; Revelation 19:19-21; Matthew 21:42-44} Jesus saith unto them, Did ye never read in the scriptures, the stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner? This is the Lord's doing, and it is marvellous in our eyes. Therefore say I unto you, the kingdom of God shall be taken from you, and given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof. And whosoever shall fall on this stone shall be broken; but on whomsoever it shall fall, it will grind him to powder. Thirdly, the Lord Jesus Christ will then put down all rule, and all authority, and power (that are enemies to his kingdom and kingly power) for he must reign till he have put all enemies under his feet ( 1 Corinthians 15:24-25 and Luke 19:27 and Isaiah 60:12). Therefore King David prophesying of those kings of the earth, and rulers, that take counsel together against the Lord, and his Christ { Psalm 2:2-3} doth thus exhort them { Psalm 2:10-12} Be wise now therefore, O ye Kings, be instructed, ye Judges of the earth:- Kiss the Song of Solomon, least HE be angry, and ye perish, etc.

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-11.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 11:15. And the seventh trumpet sounded. And there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdom of the world has become our Lord's and his anointed's, and he will reign for ever and ever. That we are to regard the great voices in heaven as chiefly at least proceeding from the great multitude, which no man could number, clothed with white robes and with palms in their hands, the saints made perfect, arises from the nature of things. For these are that portion of the heavenly inhabitants who are specially interested in this event; they are railed to reign with their Lord and his anointed, ch. Revelation 5:10; his entrance on the government is also theirs; they, the servants, now receive from their Lord the reward, Revelation 11:18. It is evident also from the correspondence, in which the expression, "to his servants" there, stands to "our Lord" here. It farther appears from a comparison of the parallel passages. Those that have the closest connection with the one before us—much more close than ch. Revelation 5:11-12, to which alone reference is commonly made—are ch. Revelation 12:10, where "the great voice" in heaven, which celebrates the completed redemption of Christ and his right to rule over the world, springing out of that, is the voice of the church; and ch. Revelation 19:1-8, where the great multitude in heaven, that proclaims with a loud voice on the fall of Rome, "Hallelujah, for the Lord our God, the Almighty reigns," consists of saints, and apostles, and prophets—comp. ch. Revelation 18:20—those who fear God, great and small. The agreement with ch. Revelation 8:3 also serves to determine "the great voices." If there the prayers of the saints cause the appearance of the angels with the seven trumpets, it can be no other than the saints who here triumph and give thanks, when the work of the seven angels was completed. Hence, though we may regard the angels generally as interested, as is shewn by ch. Revelation 7:11, we should conceive of them as being so only in a subordinate manner, and by way of concurrence. First, the whole host of the saints made perfect step forth, and celebrate in a short speech the victory of their Lord and his anointed. Then, the heavenly representatives of the church, its elite as it were, take up the discourse, and bring fully out what the others only indicate; precisely as in ch. 19, first the multitude of believers step forth, and then the elders. Accordingly, the bearers of the great voices mentioned at the beginning, are given at the close. They are no others than the servants of God, and the saints, and those who fear his name, the small and the great, Revelation 11:18. They are those, who also in ch. Revelation 15:2-4, before the entering of the seven last plagues of God, celebrate his glorious deeds and his approaching final victory over the world, and who sing in ch. Revelation 14:3 the new song before the throne.

The kingdom, βασιλεί α, signifies here the kingdom, not in the passive, but in the active sense—the dominion; comp. on ch. Revelation 1:6. In ch. Revelation 12:6, Revelation 17:18, also, the kingdom occurs so. It is from not apprehending this import, that the explanatory reading followed by Luther, ἑ γενοντο αἱ βασιλεῖ αι, has arisen: the kingdoms of the world have become. Therefore, by the kingdom having become, etc., is meant: The government is (now) possessed by our Lord and his anointed; and so it suits excellently with what follows: And he shall reign for ever and ever. He has now come to the government, and shall continue to exercise it for ever. The time of the world's supremacy, of the oppression of the church, has at length come to a final end.

The kingdom has become. The result is first actually attained in Revelation 11:19. But since the angel has already sounded, and it is fixed, that the world's catastrophe follows immediately on the trumpet, the consequence is anticipated. Such a rejoicing in prospect of the immediately approaching victory presents itself also under the old covenant. Thus Psalms 75 is a song of triumph before the victory. Here, as there, the confidence with which the coming deliverance is anticipated, rests upon the divine promise. It was guaranteed to the church by the oath of the strong angel in ch. Revelation 10:6-7, that under the trumpet of the seventh angel the mystery of God should be finished without delay, and the object of this was the dominion of the Lord and his anointed over the world.

The fact, which is here celebrated, has its proper root in the redemption accomplished by Christ—comp. Revelation 12:10; but here for the first time does the necessary consequence of that work come fully into reality. To the thanksgiving of the saints for their heavenly felicity, in ch. Revelation 7:10, corresponds here the expression of their joy on account of the final victory over the world. Bengel remarks: "As soon as the seventh angel sounds, the kingdom of the world becomes the Lord's and his Christ's, for ever. It is only in heaven, however, that this takes place so immediately, and in heaven alone is it celebrated with joy; for dreadful things still intervene on earth." But this view is only a result of the embarrassment in which they are involved, who, instead of perceiving that the seventh trumpet is comprised in ch. Revelation 11:15-19, bring within its compass all that follows to the end of the book. The scene cannot, from the very nature of things, belong to heaven; and it makes nothing for this, that it is spoken of heaven. Decisive against such a view, is ch. Revelation 10:6-7, according to which the sound of the seventh trumpet and the finishing of God's mystery, which can find its completion nowhere but on earth, for it concerns the dominion of Christ over the earth, are immediately united together.

Revelation 11:19 also decides against it, if only it is rightly interpreted. But with perfect truth Bengel remarks on the expression: it has become, "Everything, and consequently also the kingdom of the world, is God's at all times. But in things visible and invisible, Satan and the world have set up their kings and lords against the Lord and his anointed. Such an impious rebellion is brought to an end by God, and he maintains his right.

That royal word of the suffering Jesus, ‘My kingdom is not of this world,' has been greatly abused. His kingdom is not worldly, but the kingdom of the world is holy and Christian. This province, which has been long enough in the enemy's hands, has at last been finally recovered; it is possessed by the Lord and his anointed." The kingdom of the world is the Lord's and his anointed's—the Son's, into whose hands all things have been committed by the Father, John 3:35, and in particular all judgment, John 5:22. There is the same connection here between the Lord and his anointed, as in Acts 4:26, in both places from Psalms 2:2, "The kings of the earth rise up, and the princes sit in counsel against the Lord and his anointed." The conflict depicted there finds here at last an end. From the allusion to that fundamental passage it is clear, that anointed here is equivalent to king. The anointing, as was remarked in my commentary on the second Psalm, whether viewed as a real symbolical action, or spoken of in a merely figurative manner, is constantly regarded in the Old Testament as denoting the gifts of the Holy Spirit, as they were imparted to all the servants of God in his kingdom, which is characteristically distinguished from the kingdoms of this world by the very possession of these gifts. This signification comes very plainly out in the account given of the anointing of Saul, 1 Samuel 10:1, and of David, 1 Samuel 16:13-14. Kings were called by way of distinction the anointed, because they received a singularly rich supply of divine grace for their important office. The expression was on this account peculiarly appropriated to the king; he was the individual in whom the idea of the kingdom must be fully realized.[Note: Bengel: "Elisha the prophet was anointed, 1 Kings 12:16; priests were anointed, Exodus 28:41; but most of all kings; and therefore the term anointed, when used absolutely, denotes only the king. He was wont to be called the Lord's anointed, not the anointed king. In the whole gospel history the name of Christ is never explained by the word priest, but very often by the name of king. And so, as often as Messiah is spoken of in Scripture, respect is had to his kingdom."]

The future dominion of the Lord over the world, resting on the solid foundation, that he is still Lord in the midst of the world's revolt (Psalms 22:28, Psalms 24:1), was predicted in a long series of passages of Old Testament Scripture. It was the strong consolation solution which bore up the church of the Lord for many centuries, during which the world made her afraid. The most exact agreement is with Obadiah, Obadiah 1:21, "And the kingdom shall be the Lord's." Comp. Zechariah 14:9, "And the Lord will be king over the whole earth," Daniel 2:44. The world-supremacy of Christ, beside that of the Lord, is announced in Daniel 7:13-14, as well as in Psalms 2, "And behold there came one with the clouds of heaven like a Son of man, and came to the Ancient of days, and he was brought before him. And there was given him dominion, and glory, and a kingdom, and all peoples, nations, and tongues, serve him. His dominion is an everlasting dominion, which does not pass away, and his kingdom has no end." Comp. Daniel 7:18, Daniel 7:27, where the dominion of the Lord and of his anointed appears at the same time as the dominion of the people of the saints of the Most High, precisely as in the passage before us.

Our Lord, so the saints say with tender affection, instead of simply, the Lord, as used in the original passage; indicating also, that with his dominion theirs was inseparably connected; for the glory of the Lord passes over also upon the servants, comp. at ch. Revelation 9:7. Bengel would delete the our, on very slender external authority, because he does not perceive its true import. A glance at Revelation 11:18 shews, that it was necessary here. What the elders there fully express must here be indicated, at least, in the utterance of the saints. It is a mournful retrogression to seek, as many now do, to have states emancipated from the dominion of Christ. If they are severed from the end, which they are bound perpetually to promote, there will only be substituted for the dominion of grace, the dominion of judgment. But those who contend for a Christian state in opposition to wanton despisers, have here a rich consolation, and may quietly laugh at the world, while it deems their cause to be lost. The more decided the unchristianity of a state, the nearer is its absolute Christianity.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-11.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15.Great voices in heaven—Alford suggests that these voices were from the four living beings as distinguished from the twenty-four elders.” But that destroys the mysterious beauty of the apostle’s thought, which is, that the voices rolled and reverberated spontaneously through the heavens with no apparent utterer. They were as if the celestial spaces spake them.

Kingdoms—The preferable reading seems to be kingdom, in the singular, of course including the italic repetition of the word inserted by the translators. The world’s kingdom, no longer the devil’s kingdom, has become God’s and his Christ’s kingdom.

Throughout this lofty prelude, the consummation of the entire events of the seventh trumpet is announced as already completed. The utterers take their mental stand-point at the end of the whole history, and contemplate its future completion as already past. This is the prophetic future-preterite; the past tense for the future.

The sounding of the trumpet is of course the signal for the panorama of symbols to move on. The announcement of the heavenly voices utters in one sentence the glorious result of the whole movement, and is the signal for the profound worship and thanksgiving of the elders which follow.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-11.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 11:15. The rout of Satan (Revelation 12:10 and Revelation 20:4-10) means the absolute messianic ( . only in these sections = “messiah” in the eschatological sense) authority of God, as the destruction or submission of paganism (cf.Revelation 11:13) means the true coming of the eschatological (cf.Revelation 19:1-6, after Rome’s downfall). The apocalyptic motto is not so much “The Lord reigns,” as “The Lord is to reign”. Meanwhile he overrules, and every preliminary judgment shoots the pious mind forward to anticipate the final triumph. Linguistically might mean here as in Habakkuk 3:13 God’s chosen people, but the usage of the Apocalypse puts this out of the question. There is no need to delete the words here as a gloss (so, e.g., Baljon, von Soden, Rauch) or the similar phrase in En. 48:10 (with Dalman).

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 11:15". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-11.html. 1897-1910.