Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 7:17

for the Lamb in the center of the throne will be their shepherd, and will guide them to springs of the water of life; and God will wipe every tear from their eyes."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Angel (a Spirit);   Fountain;   Heaven;   Hunger;   Jesus Continued;   Lamb of God;   Persecution;   Reward;   Righteous;   Tears;   Throne;   Weeping;   Thompson Chain Reference - Fountain of Life;   Future, the;   Joy-Sorrow;   Living Water;   Saved, the;   Shepherd, Christ;   Sorrow;   Water;   Water of Life;   Wells;   The Topic Concordance - Following;   Hunger;   Living Waters;   Shepherds/pastors;   Sorrow;   Thirst;   Tribulation;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Affliction, Consolation under;   Heaven;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Fountains;   Mourning;   Tears;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Lamb;   Sorrow;   Water;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Consolation;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Heaven;   Order;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Intercession of Christ;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Feasts;   Frankincense;   Joseph;   Mourning;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Revelation, the Book of;   Water;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hope;   Joy;   Mourning Customs;   Revelation, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Atonement (2);   Comfort;   Enoch Book of;   Guide;   Heaven;   Israel;   Lamb;   Living;   Revelation, Book of;   Rufus;   Sheep, Shepherd;   Throne (2);   Tribes ;   Walk (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Fountain;   Lamb;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Navel;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Lamb;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Fountain;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Bottle;   Fountain;   Guide;   Immortal;   Lively;   Revelation of John:;   Tears;   Thirst;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for July 11;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The Lamb - The Lord Jesus, enthroned with his Father in ineffable glory.

Shall feed them - Shall communicate to them every thing calculated to secure, continue, and increase their happiness.

Living fountains of water - A spring in the Hebrew phraseology is termed living water, because constantly boiling up and running on. By these perpetual fountains we are to understand endless sources of comfort and happiness, which Jesus Christ will open out of his own infinite plenitude to all glorified souls. These eternal living fountains will make an infinite variety in the enjoyments of the blessed. There will be no sameness, and consequently no cloying with the perpetual enjoyment of the same things; every moment will open a new source of pleasure, instruction, and improvement; they shall make an eternal progression into the fullness of God. And as God is infinite, so his attributes are infinite; and throughout infinity more and more of those attributes will be discovered; and the discovery of each will be a new fountain or source of pleasure and enjoyment. These sources must be opening through all eternity, and yet, through all eternity, there will still remain, in the absolute perfections of the Godhead, an infinity of them to be opened! This is one of the finest images in the Bible.

God shall wipe away - In the most affectionate and fatherly manner, all tears from their eyes - all causes of distress and grief. They shall have pure, unmixed happiness. Reader, this is the happiness of those who are washed from their sins. Art thou washed? O, rest not till thou art prepared to appear before God and the Lamb.

If these saints had not met with troubles and distresses, in all likelihood they had not excelled so much in righteousness and true holiness. When all avenues of worldly comfort are shut up, we are obliged to seek our all in God; and there is nothing sought from him that is not found in him.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-7.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For the Lamb, which is in the midst of the throne - notes on Revelation 5:6. He is still the great agent in promoting the happiness of the redeemed in heaven.

Shall feed them - Rather, shall exercise over them the office of a shepherd - ποιμανεῖ poimainōThis includes much more than mere feeding. It embraces all the care which a shepherd takes of his flock - watching them, providing for them, guarding them from danger. Compare Psalm 23:1-2, Psalm 23:5; Psalm 36:8. See this fully illustrated in the notes on Isaiah 40:11.

And shall lead them unto living fountains of waters - Living fountains refer to running streams, as contrasted with standing water and stagnant pools. See the notes on John 4:10. The allusion is undoubtedly to the happiness of heaven, represented as fresh and everflowing, like streams in the desert. No image of happiness, perhaps, is more vivid, or would be more striking to an Oriental, than that of such fountains flowing in sandy and burning wastes. The word “living” here must refer to the fact that that happiness will be perennial. These fountains will always bubble; these streams will never dry up. The thirst for salvation will always be gratified; the soul will always be made happy.

And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes - This is a new image of happiness taken from another place in Isaiah Isaiah 25:8, “The Lord God will wipe away tears from off all faces.” The expression is one of exquisite tenderness and beauty. The poet Burns said that he could never read this without being affected to weeping. Of all the negative descriptions of heaven, there is no one perhaps that would be better adapted to produce consolation than this. This is a world of weeping - a vale of tears. Philosophers have sought a brief definition of man, and have sought in vain. Would there be any better description of him, as representing the reality of his condition here, than to say that he is one who weeps? Who is there of the human family that has not shed a tear? Who that has not wept over the grave of a friend; over his own losses and cares; over his disappointments; over the treatment he has received from others; over his sins; over the follies, vices, and woes of his fellow-men?

And what a change would it make in our world if it could be said that henceforward not another tear would be shed; not a head would ever be bowed again in grief! Yet this is to be the condition of heaven. In that world there is to be no pain, no disappointment, no bereavement. No friend is to lie in dreadful agony on a sick-bed; no grave is to be opened to receive a parent, a wife, a child; no gloomy prospect of death is to draw tears of sorrow from the eyes. To that blessed world, when our eyes run down with tears, are we permitted to look forward; and the prospect of such a world should contribute to wipe away our tears here - for all our sorrows will soon be over. As already remarked, there was a beautiful propriety, at a time when such calamities impended over the church and the world - when there was such a certainty of persecution and sorrow - in permitting the mind to rest on the contemplation of these happy scenes in heaven, where all the redeemed, in white robes, and with palms of victory in their hands, would be gathered before the throne. To us also now, amidst the trials of the present life - when friends leave us; when sickness comes; when our hopes are blasted; when calumnies and reproaches come upon us; when, standing on the verge of the grave, and looking down into the cold tomb, the eyes pour forth floods of tears - it is a blessed privilege to be permitted to look forward to that brighter scene in heaven, where not a pang shall ever be felt, and not a tear shall ever be shed.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-7.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

for the Lamb that is in the midst of the throne shall be their shepherd, and shall guide them unto fountains of waters of life: and God shall wipe away every tear from their eyes. "Lamb in the midst of the throne ...

Here is the great consolation. "As long as this earth endures, Christ is still at the center of things; and his people are indestructible."[61] Furthermore, as seen above (Revelation 7:1-4), the mighty angels of God preserve the earth itself until God's great purpose is fully accomplished.

Shall be their shepherd ... This is strongly suggestive of John 10, where Jesus revealed himself as the "Good Shepherd." One does not ordinarily think of a lamb as a shepherd, but with this Lamb it is true. Pack pointed out that all of the language of these final two verses draws upon the language of Isaiah 49:10;[62] and Bruce found an echo of Isaiah 26:8, making the whole passage applicable to the new age, "when God will swallow up death forever."[63] Only then shall the redeemed find the fountains of living waters and have all tears wiped away. Even more obvious is the fact of these sentiments being fully in harmony with the great description of the final abode of the saints in the last two chapters of this prophecy. Rist's suggestion that, "John is here indoctrinating prospective martyrs by quoting a hymn"[64] cannot be correct, nor can Moffatt's notion that, "The Apocalypse confines Christ's shepherding to the future life."[65] As a matter of fact, it is only because Christ shepherds his people in the present life that John envisioned his also doing so eternally.

Shall wipe away every tear ... The repetition of this precious promise in Revelation 21:4, where it concerns the eternal state, makes it mandatory to see these verses as a description of the same state in heaven. This final heavenly vision describing the eternal bliss of the redeemed is most appropriate as a sequel to the terrors of the wicked in the final judgment at the end of Revelation 6, strongly indicating that it is the final judgment depicted here, but with the destiny of the righteous in focus, instead of the destiny of the wicked.

It will be noticed that the heavenly scene here follows the scene of the overthrow of the wicked in the final judgment at the end of Revelation 6; and this is exactly the order in which John will give the great white throne judgment of Revelation 20, followed by the heavenly scene greatly elaborated in the final two chapters of the prophecy. Ezell was correct in connecting Revelation 8:1 with this paragraph,[66] and understanding the half hour of silence which follows the opening of the seventh seal "as the full content of that seal."[67] Thus, this whole chapter is intimately related to the sixth seal; and the seventh seal merely shows that God has not revealed anything at all of what will happen after the final judgment. That half hour of silence really rings down the curtain and draws a dramatic line under all that is written through Revelation 7:17, effecting a complete separation of it from what is afterwards written in the prophecy, and compelling us to look for a new beginning in Revelation 8:2.

[61] Ibid.

[62] Frank Pack, Revelation (Austin, Texas: The R. B. Sweet Company, 1965), Part 1, p. 72.

[63] F. F. Bruce, op. cit., p. 646.

[64] Martin Rist, op. cit., p. 424.

[65] James Moffatt, op. cit., p. 401.

[66] Douglas Ezell, Revelations on Revelation (Waco: Word Books, Inc., 1977), p. 45.

[67] Ibid.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-7.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For the Lamb, which is in the midst of the throne,.... See Revelation 5:6; not before the throne, as the great multitude are said to be, Revelation 7:9; nor round about it, as the angels in Revelation 7:11; but in the midst of it, being equal to him that sits upon it; sitting on the same throne with him, and having the same power and authority, he

shall feed them as a shepherd his flock; for this Lamb is a Shepherd, and this great multitude are his flock; whom he will feed in this state, not by his ministers, word, and ordinances, as now; but in person, and with the rich discoveries of himself, and of his love, signified by a feast, by new wine in his Father's kingdom, and his own, and by eating and drinking at his table, in the kingdom appointed by him to his followers; and hence it is they shall never hunger more: or "shall rule them", as the Vulgate Latin version renders it; for the same word signifies "to feed", and "to rule", as a king rules his subjects; Christ will now be visibly King of saints, and King over all the earth, and will reign before his ancients gloriously; and, in these days of his, Judah shall be saved, and Israel shall dwell safely under his power and protection:

and shall lead them unto living fountains of water; by "water" is meant the grace, love, and free favour of God in Christ, that pure river of water of life, which proceeds from the throne of God, and of the Lamb, from divine sovereignty; and with which the saints in this state shall be sweetly and fully solaced and refreshed; and hence they shall never thirst more: and this is said to be "living", because not only refreshing and reviving, but because it will last for ever; the love of God is from everlasting to everlasting; and it is signified by "fountains", to denote the abundance of it, even as it will be perceived and enjoyed by the saints now; for these waters will not be only up to the ankles, and knees, but a broad river to swim in, which cannot be passed over; and hither will Christ lead his people, which is, one branch of his office as a Shepherd; and which shows his care of them, and affection for them.

And God shall wipe away all tear, from their eyes; or "out of their eyes", as the Alexandrian copy reads; see Isaiah 25:8. The sense is, that that which is now the occasion of tears will cease, as the sin and corruptions of God's people, which now are the cause of many tears; as also Satan's temptations, the hidings of God's face, and the various afflictions of this life, and the persecutions of the men of the world; there will be no more of either of these; all will be made to cease; see Revelation 21:4; and in the room of them full and everlasting joy will take place, Isaiah 35:10. Mr. Daubuz thinks, that the whole of this chapter belongs to the sixth seal, and that the promises in it are such as were to be accomplished at the opening of the seventh, and do not belong to the millennium state; but had their fulfilment in the times of Constantine, who he supposes is the angel that came from the east, who restrained the persecutors of the church, and introduced a general peace in church and state; and as he came with the seal of the living God, which he understands of the cross of Christ, he put upon his standard, and on the shields of his soldiers, so he sealed the servants of God on their foreheads with it, by allowing them to make a public profession of a crucified Christ, and by protecting them in that profession, even men of all nations, Jews and Gentiles; and particularly he thinks the innumerable palm bearing company may design the council of Nice, gathered by him, which consisted of the representatives of the whole Christian church in the several nations of the world, who had great honour, freedom, and immunities conferred upon them; and that the angels are the Christian magistrates, submitting to the Christian religion, and defending the church, which was now come out of the great tribulation of Heathen persecution, and had temples and places of public worship opened for them; in which they had full liberty to serve the Lord continually, without interruption; and were secure from all affliction and persecution, and were filled with joy and gladness; and the Lamb, by the means of Constantine, as Christ's vicar and servant, he declared himself to be, fed and protected the church in peace and quietness; all which are accomplished during the rest, or "silence", under the next seal; and which I should very readily agree to, since this interpretation carries on the thread of the prophetic history without any interruption, were it not for the description of the palm bearing company, both as to quantity and quality, and the declaration of the happy state of those come out of great tribulation, which I think cannot be made to suit with any imperfect state of the church on earth, without greatly lowering the sense of the expressions used; however, if anyone prefers this exposition to what is given, I am not much averse unto it.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-7.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

in the midst of the throne — that is, in the middle point in front of the throne (Revelation 5:6).

feedGreek, “tend as a shepherd.”

living fountains of water — A, B, Vulgate, and Cyprian read, (eternal) “life‘s fountains of waters.” “Living” is not supported by the old authorities.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-7.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

In the midst (ανα μεσονana meson). In Revelation 5:6 we have εν μεσωι του τρονουen mesōi tou thronou as the position of the Lamb, and so that is apparently the sense of ανα μεσονana meson here as in Matthew 13:25, though it can mean “between,” as clearly so in 1 Corinthians 6:5.

Shall be their shepherd (παιμανει αυτουςpaimanei autous). “Shall shepherd them,” future active of ποιμαινωpoimainō (from ποιμηνpoimēn shepherd), in John 21:16; Acts 20:28; 1 Peter 5:2; Revelation 2:27; Revelation 7:17; Revelation 12:5; Revelation 19:15. Jesus is still the Good Shepherd of his sheep (John 10:11, John 10:14.). Cf. Psalm 23:1.

Shall guide them (οδη γησει αυτουςhodē gēsei autous). Future active of οδηγεωhodēgeō old word (from οδηγοςhodēgos guide, Matthew 15:14), used of God‘s guidance of Israel (Exodus 15:13), of God‘s guidance of individual lives (Psalm 5:9), of the guidance of the Holy Spirit (John 16:13), of Christ‘s own guidance here (cf. John 14:4; Revelation 14:4).

Unto fountains of waters of life (επι ζωης πηγας υδατωνepi zōēs pēgas hudatōn). The language is like that in Isaiah 49:10; Jeremiah 2:13. Note the order, “to life‘s water springs” (Swete) like the Vulgate ad vitae fontes aquarum, with emphasis on ζωηςzōēs (life‘s). For this idea see also John 4:12, John 4:14; John 7:38.; Revelation 21:6; Revelation 22:1, Revelation 22:17. No special emphasis on the plural here or in Revelation 8:10; Revelation 14:7; Revelation 16:4.

And God shall wipe away (και εχαλειπσει ο τεοςkai exaleipsei ho theos). Repeated in Revelation 21:4 from Isaiah 25:8. Future active of εχαλειπωexaleiphō old compound, to wipe out (εχex), off, away, already in Revelation 3:5 for erasing a name and in Acts 3:19 for removing the stain (guilt) of sin.

Every tear (παν δακρυονpān dakruon). Old word, with other form, δακρυdakru in Luke 7:38, Luke 7:44. Note repetition of εκek with οπταλμωνophthalmōn (out of their eyes). “Words like these of Revelation 7:15-17 must sound as a divine music in the ears of the persecuted. God will comfort as a mother comforts” (Baljon).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-7.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

In the midst ( ἀνά μεσον )

See on Revelation 5:6.

Shall feed ( ποιμανεῖ )

See on shall be shepherd of, Matthew 2:6; see on Acts 20:28; see on 1 Peter 5:2. Compare Psalm 23:1.

Shall lead ( ὁδηγήσει )

See on Luke 6:39.

Living fountains of waters ( ζώσας πηγὰς ὑδάτων )

For the participle living, read ζωῆς oflife, and render as Rev., fountains of waters of life. Compare Psalm 23:2. In the Greek order, of life stands first as emphatic.

All tears ( πᾶν δάκρυον )

Rev., correctly, every tear. Compare Isaiah 25:8.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-7.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.

For the Lamb will feed them — With eternal peace and joy; so that they shall hunger no more.

And will lead them to living fountains of water — The comforts of the Holy Ghost; so that they shall thirst no more. Neither shall they suffer or grieve any more; for God "will wipe away all tears from their eyes."

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-7.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

God

Adonai Jehovah. Isaiah 25:8.

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
Bibliographical Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Revelation 7:17". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/revelation-7.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE FLOCK ON THE CELESTIAL MOUNTAIN

‘The Lamb Which is in the midst of the Throne shall be their Shepherd.’

Revelation 7:17 (R.V.)

The relation of Jesus and His people as that of the Shepherd with His sheep is thus revealed as being an eternal relation. The heavenly life is a life lived under the pastorate of Jesus. ‘The Lamb Which is in the midst of the Throne shall be their Shepherd.’

I. Jesus is the Good Shepherd Who, like Moses of old, leads His flock to the mountain of God and ministers to them there.—When the evening of the present age shall be here, He will come as a Shepherd to gather His flock together. What ‘a gathering of the flock’ will that be! The waiting sheep in Paradise will come forth from their pastures at the call of the Shepherd’s voice and rally round Him ‘in the air.’ The faithful in the earth will undergo their change from corruption to glorification, and, thus set free to respond to the attraction of our Lord, will be caught up together with them to meet the Lord. Thus the two flocks will become one visibly, as before they were one in inner reality.

II. It is not on earth or in Paradise, but in heaven, that this ideal is fully expressed.—Only in heaven does Jesus fully satisfy the hunger and thirst of His people. ‘In Thy presence is fulness of joy, and at Thy right hand there are pleasures for evermore.’ But what is this life of heaven? I ask, What is the heavenly life, not where is heaven? A threefold bliss marks this heavenly life.

(a) There is the bliss of realised personal perfection. Imperfection marks Christian life here.

(b) There is the joy of perfected union and communion with our fellow-citizens in the heavenly city.

(c) There is the joy of perfected union with God in Christ through the Holy Ghost. This is an essential condition of the life of perfect satisfaction.

III. Thus Christian life, from the font to the throne, is a life lived under the pastorate of the Risen Jesus.—It is a life lived in His one Holy Catholic Church under its various conditions as militant on earth, expectant in Paradise, glorified in heaven.

Rev. Canon Body.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/revelation-7.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

17 For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.

Ver. 17. Shall feed them and lead them] An allusion to Psalms 23:2, where David seems to resemble powerful and flourishing doctrine to green pastures, and the secret and sweet comforts of the sacraments to the still waters.

And God shall wipe away] A metaphor from a nurse, which not only suckleth her dear child crying for hunger, but also wipes off the tears.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-7.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Revelation 7:17. For the Lamb, &c.— Interpreters are not agreed in the proper meaning of this description. Some understand it of the peaceful and prosperous state of the church on earth; and certainly, in some cases, very strong expressions of prophetic style are to be softened to a sense which will agree to a happy state of the church in this world. But others, who observe the force of these expressions, and how much they agree with the descriptions of the new heavens and new earth, ch. 21 understand it of the happy state of the church for one thousand years, which they also suppose to be a resurrection state of the martyrs. I shall only observe, says Lowman, that as the time of the one thousand years is, according to the order of this prophesy, very distant from the time to which this part of it refers, I can by no means suppose the spirit of prophesy designed that this description should be applied to the state of the millennium; and though the description may be softened to such a sense, as may represent the peaceful and prosperous state of the church under Constantine, yet I think it rather refers to the complete happiness of the martyrs and confessors in heaven. See on Revelation 7:10.

Inferences.—With what kindness, care, and tenderness does God indulge his people, by giving them seasonable respites from the troubles of this evil world! Yea, so great is his favour toward them, that, for their sakes, he mercifully averts public judgments from those nations of the earth that permit them to live in peace and safety; and when, through the corruption of mankind, persecutions and dangerous errors threaten the faithful, he will take effectual care of them; and has a vast many thousands of them here below, who own, honour, and serve him. How should it animate their faith, patience, and courage, under all their tribulations for Christ, to think of the glorious, final, and eternal issue of them to persevering believers. God, in the riches of his grace, will abundantly more than compensate their severest hardships for his sake. Innumerable multitudes of them, from among all nations, shall shine in the brightest robes of purity, righteousness, and glory, being made white by the blood of the Lamb; and they shall triumph, as with palms of victory, joy, and praise in their hands; and shall worship God with un-wearied and uninterrupted pleasure in his heavenly temple above. God himself, as sitting on his throne of glory, will dwell, in the most immediate and delightful manner, among them, to banish all uneasiness far from them; and he, as the original fountain, and Jesus Christ as the purchaser and immediate bestower of all possible blessedness, will refresh and completely satisfy them with the most refined and transporting, substantial, and noble enjoyments, ever fresh and flowing, to the utmost of their enlarged capacities and desires. And O, with what cheerful acclamations in heaven will they disclaim all merit of their own, and ascribe the entire glory of their salvation to the free grace of God through the atoning sacrifice of his Son! And with what harmonious concert will all the holy angels join in celebrating the praises of God's perfections, and of his works of nature, providence, and grace! To whom, together with the Lamb, be ascribed all glory for ever and ever. Amen.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, The winds and storms of persecution are now for a while hushed in peace, and the church enjoys undisturbed tranquillity, while ministering angels, at the command of the great Angel of the covenant, who bore the impress of the living God, and seals his believing people with the Holy Spirit of promise, restrain for a while the desolating judgments which had before destroyed the earth.

2nd, The saints, who are here sealed out of the twelve tribes, are the emblems of the faithful saints of God converted to the power of Christianity out of the Jewish church. The tribes of Dan and Ephraim, as ring-leaders in idolatry, are omitted, a brand of just reproach being set upon them for such apostacy from God. Note; God's people are always in some glorious measure sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise.

3rdly, We have a glorious scene of the happy state of the church, either during the millennium, as some suppose, or when the faithful shall have finally entered into their eternal rest.

1. They are a great multitude which no man could number; the blessed fruit of the preaching of the gospel over all the world.

2. They stand before the throne and before the Lamb, with holy boldness and sure acceptance, clothed with white robes, the emblems of honour, joy, and purity, and palms in their hands, in token of their glorious victories obtained over all their foes; for all God's faithful saints shall assuredly be finally triumphant over their foes.

3. They lifted up their voices in loud hallelujahs, crying, Salvation to our God which sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb; all glory, praise, and adoration be ascribed to Him who has graciously regarded us, and exalted us to such dignity and happiness, mean and miserable as we once were—let it be ascribed to the grace and blood of the Lamb, who gave himself to be slain for our redemption.

4. The angelic hosts stood round about the throne, encompassing the elders and living creatures, and immediately joined in their adorations; and falling on their faces, worshipped God, saying, Amen! Blessing, and glory, and wisdom, and thanksgiving, and honour, and power, and might, be unto our God for ever and ever. Amen. The inhabitants of heaven have all one mind and employment, ceaseless in the praises of their common Lord. May we now delight to join their songs, and prepare hereby for the happy service of eternity!

4thly, While St. John, with holy rapture, beheld the heavenly vision, one of the elders questions him, whether he understood what he saw, and knew who these were, and whence they came? With humble acknowledgment of his ignorance, and desire of information, he replied, Sir, thou knowest. The elder thereupon kindly undertook to inform him.

1. These, says he, are they who came out of great tribulation, through various afflictions and the fire of persecution, and have washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the Lamb: they owe their exaltation and glory to that precious blood of his, which he permitted to be shed for their sakes. Therefore, being thus redeemed to God by him, and having been enabled to approve their fidelity to their divine Master in the midst of the greatest extremities, they now receive a rich equivalent for all that they have suffered; for they are before the throne of God.

2. He informs him of the distinguished dignity and glory to which these once-suffering saints are admitted. They are admitted to the immediate presence of the Eternal Majesty, and serve him day and night, in his celestial temple, without ceasing: and he that sitteth on the throne, shall dwell among them for ever, as the author and source of their eternal felicity. They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more, knowing no more those painful cravings, neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat; no fire of persecution, nor furnace of affliction or temptation, shall there be ever apprehended: for the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne, possessed of all dominion and power, shall feed them with his rich provision, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters, to refresh and comfort their souls, which from his presence shall drink in pleasures as out of a river: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; no sin, no sorrow shall be there, nor one salt tear trickle down their faces; but unutterable and uninterrupted consolations shall be their eternal happy portion. Bring me, dear Lord, to share this blessedness among thy saints in light!

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/revelation-7.html. 1801-1803.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 7:17. (87) ὅτι) כי preceded by not, often has the meaning of but.— ἀνὰ ΄έσον τοῦ θρόνου) ἐν ΄έσῳ τοῦ θρόνου John saw τὸ ἀρνίον: ch. Revelation 5:7. In this place alone he says, ἀνὰ ΄έσον τοῦ θρόνου: comp. ἀνὰ ΄έσον, 1 Corinthians 6:5.— ἐπὶ ζωῆς(88) πηγὰς ὑδάτων) The natural construction would be, ἐπὶ πηγὰς ὑδάτων ζωῆς; but ζωῆς is put first for the sake of emphasis (as σαρκὸς, 1 Peter 3:21), and πηγὰς ὑδάτων is, as it were, one compound word, so that it may be, zu den Lebens-Wasser-brunnen. See App., Ed. ii.— ἐκ) Again see App., Ed. ii. Wolf joins ἀπὸ and ἐκ, below, ch. Revelation 22:19. And thus in one sentence John may have written ἐκ, and below ἀπό.(89)

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-7.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne; Christ, the Lamb mentioned Revelation 5:6.

Shall feed them, &c.; shall take care of them, to satisfy and to protect them, and give them the best supplies, and both make them to forget their former sorrows, and prevent any timher cause of sorrow and affliction to them. A perfect description of the glorious and happy state of saints in heaven. For wherein lieth the happiness of heaven, but in a freedom from all the evils that encumber us in this life, and the enjoyment of all the happiness we are capable of, and being ever with the Lord Jesus Christ, under his influence and conduct? So as I cannot agree with Mr. Mede, or any of those who think this vision and these phrases describe any happy, peaceable state of the church in this life, after the throwing down of antichrist; but do think that John was showed this great reward of martyrs, to encourage the church of God under all those evils they were to suffer under antichrist and the beast, in that period of time which is described mystically upon the opening of the seventh seal, which we now come to in the next chapter.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-7.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

пасти В прекрасном чередовании образов Агнец всегда был Пастырем (Пс. 22; Ин. 10:14 и послед.; Евр. 13:20).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-7.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Wipe away all tears; remove all sorrows, and fill them with perfect joy for ever.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-7.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

READER! while we look with holy meditation at this vision which John saw, and mark the four Angels holding as they were commanded, the four winds of the earth, from going forth to destruction; until the Lord had done his gracious purpose towards his servants; Let us behold our Almighty Jesus ascending from the East, to mark, his own against the day of tribulation! And while we see him so gracious to his Israel, and while we see him so gracious to his Gentile Church also, to which you and I belong, oh! for grace, to stand impressed with this most certain assurance that He is the same watchful, loving, and all lovely Lord now, as he was then. He is; He must be Jesus Christ; the Same yesterday, and today, and forever. Oh! then, depend upon it, that he hath sealed, he doth seal, and he will seal, every individual one of his redeemed.

And, Reader! let you and I behold our Jesus, (if so be, by regeneration you can call him yours,) encircled with his blood bought sons and daughters, now on his throne. Hath Jesus washed their robes, and will he not wash ours? Hath he made them white in his blood, and shall ours remain uncleansed? Hath he loved his Church only in heaven; and doth he not regard his Church upon earth? Did Jesus show so much attention to his beloved at the time here shown, and would not suffer the winds or wars to come on; until that he had sealed his redeemed, and will he behold Our exercises, our difficulties and tribulations, and look on unmoved? Oh! no, thou dear REDEEMER! thou art still the Lamb, and still in the midst of the throne. All power is thine, in heaven, and in earth. And such is thy love to thy poor ones below, that thou art watching over them night and day, lest any hurt them, and whoso toucheth them, toucheth the apple of thine eye! Oh! how sure, how safe, how blessed are all thine, both in earth and heaven.

Reader! let us seek grace, to eye Christ unceasingly, as in the midst of the throne. He hath all divine attributes, all divine blessings, all suited grace, all suited mercy. To Him may all his people come. In Him they find all suited fulness. From Him they receive the every needed grace. And to Him offer all praise and glory. Lord! hasten the hour, when thy whole Church shall be round thy throne, and thou shalt have wiped all tears from off all eyes. Amen.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/revelation-7.html. 1828.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

The living fountains of water--7:17.

These figures of speech signified that their tribulations were over. They were avenged by the overthrow of their persecutors. Henceforth the Lamb would feed them; the opposite to the symbols of want in tribulation. He would lead them unto living fountains of waters--no longer amid the dangers of the persecuting powers, but where provender, peace, refreshment and satisfaction were unrestrained. It is the apocalyptic version of the twenty-third psalm.

Finally, the ultimate in the symbols of victory: God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes--the persecutions had ended, the tribulations were over. Here the visions and scenes all merge into one company, the victorious church of Christ.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-7.html. 1966.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

The Lamb, which is in the midst of the throne, God and man, shall rule (1) them as a shepherd does his flock. By the Greek, And shall lead them unto fountains of living waters; (2) literally, to the fountains of life of waters; shall bless them with everlasting happiness. (Witham) --- He represents the happiness of the saints, under the idea of being exempt from all the wants and evils of this life. For we are not able, according to truth itself, to conceive the happiness that is prepared for us; wherefore we must content ourselves with considering what it is not, rather than what it is. He, nevertheless, seems to compare heaven to a temple or palace, in which we observe ministers and servants all in their proper order, his counselors (if we may be allowed the expression) and friends seated in presence of their prince, and the souls of the just singing the praises of the Most High. (Car.)

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Reget eos, Greek: poimanei, &c.

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Ad vitæ fontes aquarum, Greek: epi zoes pegas udaton; not Greek: zosas, as in some manuscripts.

====================

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-7.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

shall = will.

feed = tend, or shepherd. See Revelation 2:27. Micah 5:4.

living, &c. The texts read "fountains of waters of life" (App-170.) See Revelation 21:4. These two verses: refer to Isaiah 49:8-10; Isaiah 25:8. Jeremiah 31:9, Jeremiah 31:10-25. Ezekiel 47:1, Ezekiel 47:12.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-7.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.

In the midst of the throne - i:e., in the middle point in front of the throne (Revelation 5:6).

Feed, [ poimanei (Greek #4165)] - 'tend as a shepherd.'

Living fountains of water. 'Aleph (') A B, Vulgate, Cyprian, read (eternal) 'life's fountains of waters.'

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-7.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(17) For the Lamb . . .—Translate, Because the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall tend them, and shall lead them to fountains of waters of life (or, life-springs of waters); and God shall wipe away every tear from their eyes. The Lamb is described as “the Lamb in the midst of the throne.” The writer told in Revelation 5:6 that he had seen a Lamb in the midst of the throne. When he looked towards the throne, he saw the Lamb as the central object immediately in front of it. He who would draw near to the throne must pass the Lamb. The position which the Lamb held was one of significance, and is therefore repeated here. The Lamb will tend His people as a shepherd tends his flock (the word translated “feed” has this force), and will lead them to the springs of the water of life. The twenty-third Psalm rises at once to our minds. The Lord who was David’s shepherd (Psalms 23:2), who was the Good Shepherd who sought and brought home the lost for whom He died (Luke 15:4; John 10:11), does not forget the shepherd’s work in heaven. He who made His people to drink of the brook in the way (Psalms 110:7), who gave to those who came to Him the water which alone would quench their thirst (John 4:13-14; John 7:37-39), leads them now to the springs of the living water, and makes them drink of the river of His pleasures (Psalms 36:8). Significantly enough the springs of this living water are in the throne itself (Revelation 22:1). Ezekiel saw the stream issuing forth from the Temple (Ezekiel 48:1), but in the city where there is no temple we are carried to the very throne of God, to find the well-spring of every gladness. In this emblem of the water we have another allusion to the Feast of Tabernacles. Among the ceremonies observed at the feast was that of the drawing water; the priest drew a vessel of water from the brook of Siloam, and poured it out in the temple-court by the altar of burnt offering, and the people sang the words, “With joy shall ye draw water out of the wells of salvation” (Isaiah 12:3). Here the Lamb, who is also the High Priest, leads His people to the springs of the water of life. Joy, too, is theirs; for God shall wipe away every tear from (or, out of) their eyes (Isaiah 25:8; Revelation 21:4). In Isaiah it is said God shall wipe away tears from off all faces: here it is every tear. Thus shall all sorrow be removed from all: no tears shall gather in any eye, for the sources of sorrow will be cut off in the land where there is no more sin. None can weep again when it is God who wiped away their tears. Blessed are they that mourn, said Christ—blessed indeed in this, that God becomes their comforter. Only those who have wept can enjoy this consolation. Who would not shed life’s tears to have God’s hand to wipe them away!

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-7.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.
in the
5:6
feed
Psalms 22:26; 23:1,2,5; 28:9; 36:8; Song of Solomon 1:7,8; Isaiah 25:6; 40:11; 49:9; Ezekiel 34:23; Micah 5:4; 7:14; Matthew 2:6; *marg: ; John 10:11,14; 21:15-17; Acts 20:28; 1 Peter 5:2
shall lead
21:6; Psalms 36:9; Isaiah 12:3; 30:25; 35:6,7; Jeremiah 2:13; 31:9; John 4:11,14; John 7:37,38
God
4:11; 21:4; Isaiah 25:8; 30:19; 35:10; 60:20 Reciprocal: Genesis 29:2 - there;  Exodus 15:27 - Elim;  Numbers 19:17 - running water shall be put thereto;  Joshua 5:12 - the manna;  2 Kings 20:5 - I have seen;  Psalm 17:15 - I shall;  Psalm 25:5 - Lead;  Psalm 56:8 - put;  Psalm 63:1 - soul;  Psalm 65:4 - we shall be;  Psalm 107:9 - GeneralPsalm 116:8 - mine;  Proverbs 8:20 - lead;  Ecclesiastes 1:8 - the eye;  Song of Solomon 6:2 - feed;  Isaiah 38:5 - I have seen;  Isaiah 41:18 - GeneralIsaiah 49:10 - shall not;  Isaiah 51:11 - and sorrow;  Isaiah 57:18 - will lead;  Isaiah 65:19 - the voice of weeping;  Jeremiah 17:13 - forsaken;  Jeremiah 31:12 - and they;  Jeremiah 31:14 - my people;  Micah 2:13 - their;  Zechariah 14:8 - in summer;  Matthew 25:21 - enter;  Matthew 26:29 - with;  Mark 8:8 - and were;  Luke 1:53 - filled;  Luke 12:37 - that;  Luke 16:24 - in water;  John 1:29 - Behold;  John 2:10 - but;  John 4:10 - living;  John 5:26 - so hath;  John 10:3 - and leadeth;  Acts 20:37 - wept;  1 Corinthians 7:30 - that weep;  2 Thessalonians 2:16 - everlasting;  2 Timothy 1:4 - being;  Revelation 3:21 - and am;  Revelation 4:6 - the midst;  Revelation 22:1 - water

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-7.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 7:17. — "Because the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall shepherd them, and shall lead them to fountains of waters of life; and God shall wipe away every tear from their eyes." The Lamb "in the midst of the throne,"{*See remarks on Revelation 5:6.} exercising its power and expressing in Himself its majesty, will graciously provide for every need. Not angelic and providential care as now (Hebrews 1:14), but the shepherd grace of the Lamb will then be in exercise — tending, caring, preserving, and guiding each and all of the redeemed Gentile multitude. He "shall lead them to fountains of waters of life," not to channels or springs merely, but to the sources of life. The fulness and joy of earthly blessing shall be theirs, the Lamb Himself being their guide to these fountains or sources of unalloyed delight (see Isaiah 12:3).

The closing words are unequalled in their combined depth and tenderness: "And God shall wipe away every tear from their eyes," not the Lamb, be it observed, but God, against Whom they and we have sinned, shall Himself remove the causes and occasions of sorrow. If He wipes away every tear they shall never weep again. "Everlasting consolation" is the happy and assured portion of all His people, heavenly and earthly. The words in our text are verbally repeated in Revelation 21:4. There the eternal state is in view; here the millennial condition is in question. Both passages apply to saved people on earth, not to those in Heaven.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-7.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Lamb shall feed them with delicacies that are unknown to men living in the flesh. Living fountains of waters are among the blissful objects to be enjoyed by those who overcome by faith in the Lamb. Wipe away all tears by preventing anything that could cause tears.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-7.html. 1952.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

17.In the midst of the throne—In the central point of the circle comprehended in the more extended sense of the word throne. For the term seems to mean not the seat only, but the entire royal space.

Feed them—Will shepherd them, performing all the office of a shepherd to guard, protect, guide, fold, fodder, and water them.

Living fountains of waters—Greek, , life’s fountains of waters. In the New Jerusalem, Revelation 22:1, there flows “a river of the water of life’ proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb.” But in the rural regions of the “new earth” are many springs of the water of life, where the Lamb shall shepherd his flock, watering them at the fountains of immortality.

All tears—When the fountain of immortality is opened the fountain of tears is closed. For, as in Revelation 21:4, where this promise is repeated, with death all pain, all sorrow disappear, and the eye forever forgets to weep. And he who thus forever banishes our tears is no less than our loving Father, God.

The application of this chapter to the establishment of Christianity under Constantine in the Roman empire, as made by the over-historical interpreters, as Newton and Elliott, seems scarce to need a refutation. It appears inapplicable, both in position and in nature. In position, for there is nothing in the train of the narrative to bring us to the event. The four first seals are plainly correlative, and, though following in time-order, are not chronological. Equally unchronological is the martyr-cry of the fifth seal, or the mundane dissolution of the sixth. We have no bridge to carry us over to the age of Constantine. Nor in nature, for it is a heavenly, not an earthly, scene. It is in the spirit-world, before the divine throne, and not at the court of Constantine. Standing where it does, if it be made to figure any earthly event, it is so little specific that it might just as well figure any other period of religious triumph as the age of Constantine; as, for instance, the Reformation, or Wesleyan and Whitefieldian revival. As a counter picture to the dark scenes of the six seals it has its perfect place and nature. Far distant in time as its literal fulfilment is, it is ever present to the eye of vivid faith. Amid the gain-sayings of a profane world and the trials of our earthly life, this vision dawns directly before the eye of our soul, with its consolations and its glory.

Thy saints in all this glorious war

Shall conquer, though they die;

They see the triumph from afar,

By faith they bring it nigh!

 

 

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-7.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 7:17. goes with (“living waters”) though prefixed for emphasis, like in 1 Peter 3:21 (cf.Revelation 16:3 ); a favourite Johannine idea. In Enoch xlii, xlviii, the fountains contain wisdom which is drunk by all the thirsty, though in the centre there is also “a fountain of righteousness which was inexhaustible”; elsewhere in the division of Sheol assigned to the spirits of the righteous there is “a bright spring of the water of life” (Revelation 22:9) in accordance with the Pythagorean belief that the dead suffered from thirst in the underworld (Luke 16:24, cf. Dieterich, 97 f.). In the familiar vignette of ancient Egyptian eschatology, the deceased kneels before Osiris who pours out to him the water of life (the motto being that the soul may live); cf. Renouf’s “Hibb. Lect.,” p. 141, and for “living” waters as divine, R. S. 127. In the ideal realm of the good Shepherd-King Yima, Iranian belief saw neither hunger nor thirst for the faithful, and found no place for death (cf.Revelation 21:4) or falsehood (Revelation 21:8) of any kind (passages and parallels in Böklen, 133 f.).— , a touch of local colour for Asiatic Christians, since sheep and shepherds were a common feature in the Lycos valley (C. B. P. i. 40–42); but the heaven of the Apocalypse is, in Semitic fashion, pastoral or civic, with touches of Babylonian splendour, unlike some later apocalypses, e.g., that of Peter (15 f.) where the Hellenic conception of Gods garden in the next world predominates (Dieterich, 19 f.).—Briggs explains the variants (Revelation 7:15) and . (Revelation 21:3), . (Revelation 21:4) and . (Revelation 7:17) as variant translations of and ; but, like (Revelation 13:16), . (Revelation 7:3, etc.), these are probably nothing more than rhetorical variations. Unlike the synoptic tradition (e.g., Matthew 2:6) and the fourth Gospel (John 10:1; John 10:18), the Apocalypse confines Christ’s shepherding to the future life (see also Revelation 2:26-27). In Isaiah 53:6-7, the wayward roving habits of sheep express the temper of God’s people, whilst the patient submissiveness of a lamb for sacrifice denotes the function of God’s servant; in the Apocalypse, the latter (not the former) occurs. The saints are God’s flock in heaven, not on earth (contrast 1 Peter 2:25; 1 Peter 5:2 f.).

Whatever elements have been employed in the following series (Revelation 7:8-11.) of trumpet-visions, no adequate data exist to prove that John has edited a Jewish or Jewish-Christian source here any more than in 6. The vision, which forms the result of the breaking of the seventh seal (Revelation 8:1-2), opens, after a prelude (Revelation 7:2-5), in Revelation 8:6 and does not close till Revelation 11:19 (cf.Revelation 8:5).

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 7:17". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-7.html. 1897-1910.