corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.19.01.22
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Romans 6:4

Therefore we have been buried with Him through baptism into death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life.

Adam Clarke Commentary

We are buried with him by baptism into death - It is probable that the apostle here alludes to the mode of administering baptism by immersion, the whole body being put under the water, which seemed to say, the man is drowned, is dead; and, when he came up out of the water, he seemed to have a resurrection to life; the man is risen again; he is alive! He was, therefore, supposed to throw off his old Gentile state as he threw off his clothes, and to assume a new character, as the baptized generally put on new or fresh garments. I say it is probable that the apostle alludes to this mode of immersion; but it is not absolutely certain that he does so, as some do imagine; for, in the next verse, our being incorporated into Christ by baptism is also denoted by our being planted, or rather, grafted together in the likeness of his death; and Noah's ark floating upon the water, and sprinkled by the rain from heaven, is a figure corresponding to baptism, 1 Peter 3:20, 1 Peter 3:21; but neither of these gives us the same idea of the outward form as burying. We must be careful, therefore, not to lay too much stress on such circumstances. Drowning among the ancients was considered the most noble kind of death; some think that the apostle may allude to this. The grand point is, that this baptism represents our death to sin, and our obligation to walk in newness of life: without which, of what use can it or any other rite be?

Raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father - From this we learn, that as it required the glory of the Father, that is, his glorious energy, to raise up from the grave the dead body of Christ, so it requires the same glorious energy to quicken the dead soul of a sinner, and enable him to walk in newness of life.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/romans-6.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Therefore we are buried … - It is altogether probable that the apostle in this place had allusion to the custom of baptizing by immersion. This cannot, indeed, be proved, so as to be liable to no objection; but I presume that this is the idea which would strike the great mass of unprejudiced readers. But while this is admitted, it is also certain that his main scope and intention was not to describe the mode of baptism; nor to affirm that that mode was to be universal. The design was very different. It was to show that by the solemn profession made at our baptism, we had become dead to sin, as Christ was dead to the living world around him when he was buried; and that as he was raised up to life, so we should also rise to a new life. A similar expression occurs in Colossians 2:12, “Buried with him in baptism,” etc. See the Editors‘ Notes at Matthew 3:6, Matthew 3:16.

Into death - εἰς eisUnto death; that is, with a solemn purpose to be dead to sin and to the world. Grotius and Doddridge, however, understand this as referring to the death of Christ - in order to represent the death of Christ - or to bring us into a kind of fellowship with his death.

That like as - In a similar manner. Christ rose from death in the sepulchre; and so we are bound by our vows at baptism to rise to a holy life.

By the glory of the Father - Perhaps this means, amidst the glory, the majesty and wonders evinced by the Father when he raised him up; Matthew 28:2-3. Or possibly the word “glory” is used here to denote simply his power, as the resurrection was a signal and glorious display of his omnipotence.

Even so - As he rose to new life, so should we. As he rose from death, so we, being made dead to sin and the world by that religion whose profession is expressed by baptism, should rise to a new life, a life of holiness.

Should walk - Should live, or conduct. The word “walk” is often used to express the course of a man‘s life, or the tenor of his conduct; Romans 4:12; Romans 8:1 notes; 1 Corinthians 5:7; 1 Corinthians 10:3 notes; Ephesians 2:10; Ephesians 4:1 notes, etc.

In newness of life - This is a Hebraism to denote new life. We should rise with Christ to a new life; and having been made dead to sin, as he was dead in the grave, so should we rise to a holy life, as he rose from the grave. The argument in this verse is, therefore, drawn from the nature of the Christian profession. By our very baptism, by our very profession, we have become dead to sin, as Christ became dead; and being devoted to him by that baptism, we are bound to rise, as he did, to a new life.

While it is admitted that the allusion here was probably to the custom of immersion in baptism, yet the passage cannot be adduced as an argument that that is the only mode, or that it is binding on all Christians in all places and ages, for the following reasons:

(1) The scope or design of the apostle is not to discuss the mode of baptism, Or to state any doctrine on the subject. It is an incidental allusion in the course of an argument, without stating or implying that this was the universal mode even then, still less that it was the only possible mode. His main design was to state the obligation of Christians to be holy, from the nature of their profession at baptism - an obligation just as impressive, and as forcible, from the application of water in any other mode as by immersion. It arises from the fact of baptism, not from the mode. It is just as true that they who are baptized by affusion, or by sprinkling, are baptised into his death; become professedly dead to sin and the world, and under obligations to live to God, as those who are immersed. It results from the nature of the ordinance, not from the mode.

(2) if this was the mode commonly, it does not follow that it was the only mode, nor that it was to be universally observed; There is no command that this should be the only mode. And the simple fact that it was usually practiced in a warm climate, where ablutions were common, does not prove that it is to be observed amidst polar snows and ice, and in infancy, and age, and feebleness, and sickness; see the note at Acts 8:38-39.

(3) if this is to be pressed literally as a matter of obligation, why should not also the following expression, “If we have been planted together,” etc., be pressed literally, and it be demanded that Christians should somehow be “planted” as well as “buried?” Such an interpretation only shows the absurdity of insisting on a literal interpretation of the Scriptures in cases of simple allusion, or where the main scope is illustration by figurative language.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/romans-6.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

We were buried therefore with him through baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we also might walk in newness of life.

We are buried ... refers to immersion as the action known as baptism in the apostolic age. The fact that baptism, as administered by people today, differs from the rite as taught and administered by the apostles of Christ, is due to the unwillingness of people to abide in the teachings of the word of God. It is futile to appeal to the testimony of lexicons and histories, for all people already know that New Testament baptism was by immersion in water, the futility deriving from this, that people have arrogantly removed the entire ordinance from having, in their views, any significant utility in the scheme of redemption. This single verse of the holy scriptures is alone sufficient to show immersion as the original Christian baptism; and no man can misunderstand it without extensive help; but, lest there be any doubt regarding the testimony available, a few typical comments are here presented:

Chrysostom:

When we sink our heads in the water, as in a tomb, the old man is buried, and going down, is wholly hid once for all.

Tholuck:

In the early days of the church, persons, when baptized, were first plunged below, and then raised above the water.

Macknight:

For are you ignorant, that so many of you as have, by baptism, become Christ's disciples, have been baptized into the likeness of his death, having been buried under the water, as persons who, like Christ, have been killed by sin.

Conybeare and Howson:

This passage cannot be understood unless it is borne in mind that the primitive baptism was by immersion.

Barnes:

It is altogether probable that the apostle has allusions to the custom of baptism by immersion.

Bloomfield:

There is a plain allusion to the ancient mode of baptism by immersion.[16]

Wuest:

The word "baptized" is not the translation of the Greek word here, but its transliteration, its spelling in English letters. The word is used in the classics of a smith who dips a piece of hot iron in the water.[17]

Thayer:

Definition of [@baptisma]: immersion, submersion.[18]

Mosheim:

In this century (the first) baptism was administered in convenient places, without the public assemblies; and by immersing the candidate wholly in water.

Barrett:

Paul here makes use of the picture suggested by the practice of baptism by immersion.[19]

One hundred other concurring citations might easily be brought forward; but these are more than enough to show what is easily visible in the verse itself, that baptism in the age that knew the Lord was by immersion.

Paul's mention of the "burial" in baptism cannot refer to the interment of one already dead to sin, as affirmed by Godet, but to the action which constitutes baptism, this being true because one cannot be "dead to sin" unless and until he is in the body of Christ, which state is entered through baptism. The error of Godet and many others in this misunderstanding sprang from a failure to determine the true meaning of Paul's phrase "dead to sin" which must not be confused with being "dead in sin." The person dead in sin is yet unsaved; the person dead to sin (through being in Christ) is saved. Therefore, baptism is not merely some kind of symbolical proof of our already being dead to sin, but is the divinely imposed condition of our becoming so. The scriptures do not teach that Christians are baptized to prove that they are dead to sin, but in order to bo `in Christ," and therefore truly dead to sin "in him."

That like as Christ was raised from the dead ... Having shown that the baptized believer, upon his being thereby united with Christ, is then dead unto sin, Paul at once went a step further by pointing out that Christ rose from the dead to a higher type of life, and appealed to this as an analogy of the Christian's rising from the watery grave of baptism to "walk in newness of life."

In newness of life ... is a reference, not merely to the upright morality and integrity of the Christian pilgrimage, but also to an entirely new status that pertains to him following his union with Christ in baptism. The old man has been renounced, the old identity repudiated, self having been slain; and the Christian is, in a sense, no longer his old self, but "is Christ" (Galatians 2:20).

The newness of life mentioned here is such a wonderful thing as to justify the opinions of those who hold this to be the first resurrection, a view certainly permissible in the light of Jesus' teaching in John 5:25.

The newness of life is made possible by the reception of the Holy Spirit of promise (Ephesians 1:13), imparted after the believer's repentance and baptism (Acts 2:38f), and as a consequence thereof. Does this newness of life mean that the possessor of it cannot sin? No. The evil nature of man, his old self, is dethroned through conversion to Christ, and the rightful sovereign of the soul, who is Christ, is enthroned instead of the old man. The will of man, however, still free, can reverse the decision. As Wuest explained:

When the believer sins, the dethroned king, the evil nature mounts to the throne, with the consequent dethronement of the Lord Jesus. Such a procedure cannot go on often, nor indefinitely, for God puts a curb upon such a thing by sending suffering, chastening, and the Christian is made miserable by a guilty conscience and the indwelling Spirit who is grieved at such conduct. ... God has so adjusted things in the Christian's life that, while he remains a free moral agent capable of choosing between obeying the divine nature or the evil nature, yet the preponderance of his choices are Godward. ... Hence the impossibility of the Christian's sustaining habitually the same relationship to the evil nature which he sustained before he was saved.[20]

Wuest's analysis is a good explanation of why the Christian cannot continue in sin that grace may abound. To be alive spiritually in Christ Jesus is to "walk in newness of life"; and what a difference there really is. Prior to their salvation, people are without hope or promise, alienated from God, children of wrath, walking in darkness, hateful, and hating one another; but in Christ, one is part of an utterly new creation. He is truly born again. Old things have passed away; behold all things are made new!

[16] This and the five preceding quotations are from Moses E. Lard, Commentary on Paul's Letter to Romans (Cincinnati, Ohio: Christian Board of Publication, 1914), p. 200.

[17] Kenneth S. Wuest, op. cit., p. 96.

[18] R. L. Whiteside, A New Commentary on Paul's Letter to the Saints at Rome (Denton, Texas: Miss Inys Whiteside, 1945), p. 130. The quote from Mosheim is also found here.

[19] C. K. Barrett, A Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (New York and London: Harper and Row, Publishers, 1957), p. 123.

[20] Kenneth Wuest, op. cit., p. 95.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/romans-6.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death,.... The nature and end of baptism are here expressed; the nature of it, it is a "burial"; and when the apostle so calls it, he manifestly refers to the ancient and only way of administering this ordinance, by immersion; when a person is covered, and as it were buried in water, as a corpse is when laid the earth, and covered with it: and it is a burial with Christ; it is a representation of the burial of Christ, and of our burial with him as our head and representative, and that "into death"; meaning either the death of Christ as before, that is, so as to partake of the benefits of his death; or the death of sin, of which baptism is also a token; for believers, whilst under water, are as persons buried, and so dead; which signifies not only their being dead with Christ, and their communion with him in his death, but also their being dead to sin by the grace of Christ, and therefore ought not to live in it: for the apostle is still pursuing his argument, and is showing, from the nature, use, and end of baptism, that believers are dead to sin, and therefore cannot, and ought not, to live in it; as more fully appears from the end of baptism next mentioned;

that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the father, even so we also should walk in newness of life; for the end of baptism is not only to represent the death and burial, but also the resurrection of Christ from the dead, which is here said to be "by the glory of the Father", some read the words, "unto the glory of the Father"; meaning either, that the Father might be glorified hereby; or that Christ, being raised from the dead, might enjoy glory with the Father, as he does in human nature; but rather the phrase expresses the means by which, and not the end to which, Christ was raised from the dead: and by the "glory of the Father" is meant, the glorious power of the Father, which was eminently displayed in raising Christ from the dead; and as baptism is designed to represent the resurrection of Christ, which is done by raising the person out of the water, so likewise to represent our resurrection from the death of sin, to a life of grace: whence it must be greatly incumbent on baptized believers, who are raised from the graves of sin by the power of Christ, to "walk in newness of life"; for since they are become new creatures, and have new hearts and new spirits given them, new principles of light, life, grace, and holiness implanted in them, and have entered into a new profession of religion, of which baptism is the badge and symbol, they ought to live a new life and conversation.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/romans-6.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead d by the glory of the Father, even so e we also should walk in newness of life.

(d) So that Christ himself, being released of his infirmity and weakness, might live in glory with God forever.

(e) And we who are his members rise for this purpose, that being made partakers of the very same power, we should begin to lead a new life, as though we were already in heaven.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/romans-6.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Therefore we are — rather, “were” (it being a past act, completed at once).

buried with him, by baptism into death — (The comma we have placed after “him” will show what the sense is. It is not, “By baptism we are buried with Him into death,” which makes no sense at all; but, “By baptism with Him into death we are buried with Him”; in other words, “By the same baptism which publicly enters us into His death, we are made partakers of His burial also”). To leave a dead body unburied is represented, alike in heathen authors as in Scripture, as the greatest indignity (Revelation 11:8, Revelation 11:9). It was fitting, therefore, that Christ, after “dying for our sins according to the Scriptures,” should “descend into the lower parts of the earth” (Ephesians 4:9). As this was the last and lowest step of His humiliation, so it was the honorable dissolution of His last link of connection with that life which He laid down for us; and we, in being “buried with Him by our baptism into His death,” have by this public act severed our last link of connection with that whole sinful condition and life which Christ brought to an end in His death.

that like as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father — that is, by such a forth-putting of the Father‘s power as was the effulgence of His whole glory.

even so we also — as risen to a new life with Him.

should walk in newness of life — But what is that “newness?” Surely if our old life, now dead and buried with Christ, was wholly sinful, the new, to which we rise with the risen Savior, must be altogether a holy life; so that every time we go back to “those things whereof we are now ashamed” (Romans 6:21), we belie our resurrection with Christ to newness of life, and “forget that we have been purged from our old sins” (2 Peter 1:9). (Whether the mode of baptism by immersion be alluded to in this verse, as a kind of symbolical burial and resurrection, does not seem to us of much consequence. Many interpreters think it is, and it may be so. But as it is not clear that baptism in apostolic times was exclusively by immersion [see on Acts 2:41 ], so sprinkling and washing are indifferently used in the New Testament to express the cleansing efficacy of the blood of Jesus. And just as the woman with the issue of blood got virtue out of Christ by simply touching Him, so the essence of baptism seems to lie in the simple contact of the element with the body, symbolizing living contact with Christ crucified; the mode and extent of suffusion being indifferent and variable with climate and circumstances).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/romans-6.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

We were buried therefore with him by means of baptism unto death (συνεταπημεν ουν αυτωι δια του βαπτισματος εις τον τανατονsunetaphēmen oun autōi dia tou baptismatos eis ton thanaton). Second aorist passive indicative of συνταπτωsunthaptō old verb to bury together with, in N.T. only here and Colossians 2:12. With associative instrumental case (αυτωιautōi) and “by means of baptism unto death” as in Romans 6:3.

In newness of life (εν καινοτητι ζωηςen kainotēti zōēs). The picture in baptism points two ways, backwards to Christ‘s death and burial and to our death to sin (Romans 6:1), forwards to Christ‘s resurrection from the dead and to our new life pledged by the coming out of the watery grave to walk on the other side of the baptismal grave (F. B. Meyer). There is the further picture of our own resurrection from the grave. It is a tragedy that Paul‘s majestic picture here has been so blurred by controversy that some refuse to see it. It should be said also that a symbol is not the reality, but the picture of the reality.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/romans-6.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

We are buried with ( συνετάφημεν )

Rev., more accurately, were buried. Therefore, as a natural consequence of death. There is probably an allusion to the immersion of baptism. Compare Colossians 3:3.

Into death

Through the baptism into death referred to in Romans 6:3. Both A.V. and Rev. omit the article, which is important for the avoidance of the error buried into death.

Glory ( δόξης )

The glorious collective perfection of God. See on Romans 3:23. Here the element of power is emphasized, which is closely related to the idea of divine glory. See Colossians 1:11. All the perfections of God contribute to the resurrection of Christ - righteousness, mercy, wisdom, holiness.

We might walk ( περιπατήσωμεν )

Lit., walk about, implying habitual conduct. See on John 11:9; see on 1 John 1:6; see on 3 John 1:4; see on Luke 11:44.

In newness of life ( ἐν καινότητι ζωῆς )

A stronger expression than new life. It gives more prominence to the main idea, newness, than would be given by the adjective. Thus 1 Timothy 6:17, uncertainty of riches; not uncertain riches, as A.V.


Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/romans-6.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.

We are buried with him — Alluding to the ancient manner of baptizing by immersion.

That as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory — Glorious power. Of the Father, so we also, by the same power, should rise again; and as he lives a new life in heaven, so we should walk in newness of life. This, says the apostle, our very baptism represents to us.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/romans-6.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Buried. Those who consider immersion the only proper mode of baptism, attach great importance to this expression, as an incidental indication that that mode was the one present to the apostle's mind.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/romans-6.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

4.We have then been buried with him, etc. He now begins to indicate the object of our having been baptized into the death of Christ, though he does not yet completely unfold it; and the object is — that we, being dead to ourselves, may become new creatures. He rightly makes a transition from a fellowship in death to a fellowship in life; for these two things are connected together by an indissoluble knot — that the old man is destroyed by the death of Christ, and that his resurrection brings righteousness, and renders us new creatures. And surely, since Christ has been given to us for life, to what purpose is it that we die with him except that we may rise to a better life? And hence for no other reason does he slay what is mortal in us, but that he may give us life again.

Let us know, that the Apostle does not simply exhort us to imitate Christ, as though he had said that the death of Christ is a pattern which all Christians are to follow; for no doubt he ascends higher, as he announces a doctrine, with which he connects, as it is evident, an exhortation; and his doctrine is this — that the death of Christ is efficacious to destroy and demolish the depravity of our flesh, and his resurrection, to effect the renovation of a better nature, and that by baptism we are admitted into a participation of this grace. This foundation being laid, Christians may very suitably be exhorted to strive to respond to their calling. Farther, it is not to the point to say, that this power is not apparent in all the baptized; for Paul, according to his usual manner, where he speaks of the faithful, connects the reality and the effect with the outward sign; for we know that whatever the Lord offers by the visible symbol is confirmed and ratified by their faith. In short, he teaches what is the real character of baptism when rightly received. So he testifies to the Galatians, that all who have been baptized into Christ, have put on Christ. (Galatians 3:27.) Thus indeed must we speak, as long as the institution of the Lord and the faith of the godly unite together; for we never have naked and empty symbols, except when our ingratitude and wickedness hinder the working of divine beneficence. (185)

By the glory of the Father, that is, by that illustrious power by which he exhibited himself as really glorious, and as it were manifested the greatness of his glory. Thus often is the power of God, which was exercised in the resurrection of Christ, set forth in Scripture in sublime terms, and not without reason; for it is of great importance, that by so explicit a record of the ineffable power of God, not only faith in the last resurrection, which far exceeds the perception of the flesh, but also as to other benefits which we receive from the resurrection of Christ, should be highly commended to us. (186)

“Buried with him,” means buried like him, or in like manner; and so “crucified with him,” in Romans 6:6, is the same : συν prefixed to verbs, has clearly this meaning. See Romans 8:17; Colossians 3:1; 2 Timothy 2:11. “Into death” is not to be connected with “planted,” but with “baptism,” it was “a baptism into death,’ that is, which represented death, even death unto sin. — Ed.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/romans-6.html. 1840-57.

Vv. 4. "Therefore we are buried with Him by baptism into death: in order that as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life."

If baptism were, or represented, the death of which Paul had spoken, the therefore would be very hard indeed to explain (see the commentaries). But if baptism is in his view the external proof of death, as burial is the proof of decease, he can take up again the course of his argument and say: "In consequence of this death to sin undergone in Christ, we have therefore been buried with Him...in order also to rise with him," which signifies: "buried with Him, not with the aim of remaining in the tomb or of issuing from it to return to the past life, but to penetrate into a new life, whence a return to the old is definitely precluded." The clause into death cannot depend on the verb we are buried, as Grot., Hofm., and Ostervald"s version would have it. How could it be said of one interred that he thereby descends into death? The converse would be the truth. This clause, therefore, must be made directly dependent on the word baptism: "by baptism into death." The substantive βάπτισμα, baptism, like those generally derived from verbs in ιζω, has a forcible meaning which allows it easily to have this position and the relation between the notions expressed by the two substantives is so close, that no article was needed to connect them. What also guides us quite naturally to make the words into death dependent on the word baptism, is Romans 6:3 : We were baptized into his death. Undoubtedly we must explain the phrase: baptism into death, like the similar ones preceding: "baptism (with water) in relation to death." Our versions translate: "into His death" (Osterv., Oltram.). But if this had been the apostle"s view, he would have expressed it by adding the pronoun αὐτοῦ, of Him. He evidently wished to leave the notion of death in all its generality, that the word might be applied at once to His death, and ours included in His. It is in relation to these two deaths which have taken place that the believer is baptized.

Modern commentators are not at one on the question whether the apostle means to allude to the external form of the baptismal rite in the primitive church. It seems to us very probable that it is so, whether primitive baptism be regarded as a complete immersion, during which the baptized disappeared for a moment under water (which best corresponds to the figure of burial), or whether the baptized went down into the water up to his loins, and the baptizer poured the water with which he had filled the hollow of his hands over his head, so as to represent an immersion. The passage, Mark 7:4, where the term βαπτισμός, a washing, bath, lustration, baptism (Hebrews 6:2), is applied not only to the cleansing of cups and utensils, objects which may be plunged into water, but also to that of couches or divans, proves plainly that we cannot insist on the sense of plunging, and consequently on the idea of total immersion, being attached to the term baptism. It is nevertheless true, that in one or other of these forms the going down into the water probably represents, in Paul"s view, the moral burying of the baptized, and his issuing from the water, his resurrection.

The relation between the two facts of burial and baptism indicated by the apostle is this: Burial is the act which consummates the breaking of the last tie between man and his earthly life. This was likewise the meaning of our Lord"s entombment. Similarly by baptism there is publicly consummated the believer"s breaking with the life of the present world, and with his own natural life.

It is a mistake to represent the idea of the first proposition of the verse as entirely isolated from all that follows. Paul means, not only that we have been buried with Christ, but that we have been so, like Him, in order to rise again.

The ἵνα, in order that, is the essential word of the verse. In the case of an ordinary death, the man is inclosed in the tomb, to remain there; but he who is buried with Christ is buried with one who died and rose, consequently with the intention of rising also. This idea is essential to the apostle"s argument. Indeed, the believer"s death, even with the baptism which seals it, would not suffice for a sure guarantee that he will not return to his old life of sin. Did not Lazarus come forth from the tomb to resume life? What, for one dead, renders his return to an earthly existence definitively impossible, is his passing to a new and higher life by the way of a resurrection. Now, such is precisely the believer"s case. By being buried with Christ by baptism, he does not intend to remain thereafter inactive and lifeless, any more than Christ Himself, when giving Himself up to the grave, thought of remaining in it. As Christ gave His life to take it again (John 10:17-18), the believer renounces his life of sin for Him only to receive from Him another and wholly different life (Luke 17:33). His baptism, which supposes his death, tends to life. To die to sin, is it not to die to death, and consequently to spring to life? As, then, by His burial Christ broke the last tie with His earthly life and entered on a higher life, so the believer, by his baptism, finds himself placed between a life which has taken end, and a wholly different one which opens before him. Paul knew by experience the situation indicated by his ἵνα, in order that. In Acts 9 we behold him placed between death on the one hand (Romans 6:8-9), and the burial of baptism, followed by resurrection through the Holy Spirit, on the other (Romans 6:17-18). Comp. also the position of the penitents of Pentecost, to whom Peter says: "Be baptized for the pardon of your sins, and ye shall receive the Holy Spirit." It is therefore true, as the end of the verse says, that what the resurrection was to Christ, renewing by the Holy Spirit is to believers. And in this last fact there is found the answer to the question of Romans 6:2 : "How shall we, who are dead to sin, live any longer therein?" Perhaps, if we were no more than dead, it would not be possible to answer this question so positively. But if, being dead, we have penetrated to a higher life, the relation to the old life is most certainly terminated. The conjunction ὥσπερ, even as, indicates only an analogy, a resemblance. The sequel will bring out the internal necessity on which this resemblance rests.

The expression: from the dead, is an allusion to the state of death to sin in which the believer receives baptism, and which paves the way for his spiritual resurrection.

The glory of the Father by which Christ was raised, is not the display of His power apart from His other perfections; but, as usual, that of all the divine attributes combined. For they have all contributed to this masterpiece of the revelation of God on the earth, righteousness as well as mercy, wisdom as well as holiness. Speaking of the resurrection of Lazarus, Jesus said to Martha: "Thou shalt see the glory of God." But here we have to do with the resurrection of the Son; and therefore Paul says: by the glory of the Father.

The word so expresses the analogy of the second fact with the first, irrespectively of the individuals in whom it is realized; the we also sets forth the living personalities in whom the prototype is reproduced.

In speaking of believers, the apostle does not rest, as in the case of Christ Himself, on the bare fact of their resurrection, but solely on its permanent consequence, the new life which flows from it: that we should walk in newness of life. He does so because, in regard to believers, he wishes solely to shut out their return to their former life; now this result springs from life in a state of complete realization, rather than from the act by which it is entered on.

The term περιπατεῖν, to walk, is a frequent figure with Paul for moral conduct.

Paul says: newness of life, instead of new life. By this turn of expression he gives less prominence to the idea of life (in contrast to that of death) than to the new nature of the second life in contrast to the nature of that which it excludes. The slightest detail of style is always strictly determined in his writing by the principal thought.

Infant baptism does not seem to me to be either assumed or excluded by this passage. The baptism assumed here is certainly that of adults, and adults only. The act of baptism is put between faith (with death to sin through faith) on the one hand, and renewing by the Holy Spirit on the other. Baptism, thus understood, therefore involves the actual fact of faith and of death to sin, as much as burial implies the death of the buried. But, at the same time, it is clear that Paul adduces the rite of baptism such as it exists at the time of his writing. The baptism of adults was that which, from the nature of things, suited the first generation of believers, as the parents required to belong to the church before there could be any question of introducing their children into it. The apostle does not therefore think of excluding a form which may arise when, circumstances having changed, family life shall have become an integral element in that of the church. The only question is, whether this modification is in keeping with the spirit of the gospel. And this is a question which it seems to me impossible to examine here without breaking the plan of our exegesis.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/romans-6.html.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

AIMS IN THE CHRISTIAN LIFE

‘Newness of life.’

Romans 6:4

A new life springs from a new motive, goes by a new way on to a new end.

From that singleness of aim and end, as soon as a man has it, three results immediately ensue.

I. Having now one great, high object before him, gives a fullness and consistency to his character.—It is just what every man wants to make him really happy, or really useful, or really great; a definite intention—a scope, a purpose worthy of his being; and that concentration of purpose gives strength of character. A thousand things, which used to seem very great to him, grow into littleness. He has a grand design. That design lies on far in eternity; and he lives up to his mark. And so, with greater force than he ever had before, he gathers himself to attain that which is eternal.

II. As soon as God’s glory is your chief pursuit in life, your will must necessarily be conformed to God’s will, and God’s will is always for His own glory—and everything He does in this world is for His own glory—therefore, if you desire God’s glory, whatever is His, must be after your mind, and nothing can offend it. And this oneness of the will with the will of God is rest, the only rest which it is possible to have in this world, because it is rest in God, and rest on God, being at rest with God.

III. Whoever lives for the glory of God must live to do good to his fellow-creatures; for God is glorified by the extension of His own kingdom, by the propagation of truth, by the salvation of souls, by the reflection of His own image, by the happiness of His creatures. To promote these things, therefore, that man must now begin to live. Therefore he becomes a labourer in God’s vineyard—he wins souls—he has a daily work to do. And therefore he is never listless. He is a man engaged and busy. And, all the while, he is serving the tenderest Master, Who loves him well; and Whom he loves well. And that service is perfect liberty. That is health; and that health is happiness; and that happiness is ‘newness of life.’

Illustration

‘Every man must live according to his level; and no one could, honestly, live above his level. But, where the grace of God is, the level is always rising. And thus these “new” pleasures coming in necessarily drive out the “old” ones, and so make “the new life.”’

(SECOND OUTLINE)

A NEW CREATURE

Self is the ruling principle of every man whom the grace of God has not changed. Self is his God. Now how is it in the Christian? He has union with Christ, therefore, in him, Christ and self are one. By a blessed reaction, his God is now himself—his new self—his real self; his life is the life of God in his soul; his happiness is God’s glory; therefore still he studies self, but self is Christ.

Let us trace where the ‘newness’ lies.

I. A new motive.—First there is set, in that man, a ‘new’ motive, a ‘new’ spring welling up—‘I am forgiven, God loves me, God has made me His. Oh,! how shall I pay Him? Never! But how can I show Him that I do indeed love Him Who has been so exceedingly kind to me?’ That is ‘newness’; and ‘the the dew of its birth is of the womb of the morning.’

II. A new principle.—Bars and fetters have been falling off from that man’s soul, and he feels a ‘new’ principle, and it is as delightful to him as it is strange. He is emancipated from a long dark bondage—he is ‘free among the dead’—free to pray from his heart—free to speak out everything. The thoughts of deep communion with God run leapingly—he can go into His very presence—the burden is gone—the barrier of unbelief, the charnel-house of wicked lust, he has got out of them—they are left behind—the past is an empty grave, and there is a ‘newness’—the ‘newness’ of constant resurrection morning. And a ‘new’ current flows in his very life-blood, he feels the springs of his immortality, he carries in him his own eternity. And he goes forth, that man, into the old world—its scenes are just the same, but a ‘new’ sunshine lies upon everything—it is the medium of his ‘new-born’ peace—it is a smile of God. And oh.! how changed that world looks to him; every day and every moment there are secret comings in of grace to his soul—hidden supplies of wisdom, patience, power, holiness, sweetness, love; and each one brings its own gushing.

III. A new standard.—And so his standard is always rising. He leaves the past attainments behind, as nothing to the heights which are opening before him. He has ever a new ambition; and new aspirations bear him up to new ranges in the Christian journey, and therefore he enterprises new works for God. This soul and that soul wake up an interest in his thoughts and prayers. Another and another mission for Christ forces itself upon his mind. His charities go forth ‘beside all waters,’ into wider and wider circles. He can never do enough; the more he does the more he feels undone—the greater his works, the deeper his un-profitableness. And all the while, Christ reveals Himself to him with ever-increasing clearness.

—Rev. James Vaughan.

Illustration

‘In everything which is really of God there is a singular freshness; it is always like that “tree of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every month”; there is a continual novelty. And yet some people speak of the sameness of a religious life. Strange! how often things are least rightly read in their characterising features. Through a new spirit—endowed with a new heart—by a new and living way—in obedience to a new commandment—with mercies new to us every morning—carrying a new name—we travel to a new heaven and a new earth, where we shall sing a new song for ever and ever. Well might Christ say of Himself, “Behold, I make all things new.”’

(THIRD OUTLINE)

A RELIGION OF NEWNESS

Christianity is a religion of newness.

I. It consists in a new covenant.

II. It imposes a new commandment.

III. It announces a new creation.

IV. It constructs a new humanity and a new man.

V. It imposes a new name.

VI. It teaches a new song.

VII. It promises a new heaven and a new earth.

VIII. It summons to a new life.

Illustration

‘There is a daily renewing of the Holy Ghost, there is a freshness of spiritual fervour and achievement, which points on to the time when God shall make all things new, and when the great and final regeneration shall be Divinely consummated.’


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/romans-6.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

4 Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.

Ver. 4. We are buried] Burial is a continuing under death, so is mortification a continuation of dying to sin, Mors quaedam perpetuata; sin is by degrees abated, and at length abolished, when once our earthly tabernacles are dissolved.

Walk in newness of life] Resurrectione Domini configuratur vita, quae hic geritur. Walk as Christ walked after his resurrection.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/romans-6.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Romans 6:4

Easter Even.

I. We know what an impression is made by the sight of a dead body, especially if it is that of one who has been near and dear to us. And every one who has felt this lesson has been for a time, for the moment it may be, or hour, or day, if not longer, a different man. The world has lost its power either to distress or please him, and appears in its true colours; and he sees what sin is before God. Yes; the one great truth of all truths is to know what sin is before God. Now this is the wisdom of the grave, yet of itself it is but a cold and lifeless wisdom; but combined with the death and burial of Christ, and the contemplation of it, this wisdom is quickened by love: love is able to overcome the power of death, not by avoiding it, but by wrestling with it.

II. There was an old heathen philosophy that taught deadness to the world: the thorough laying aside it required of all human feeling and passions; but what it inculcated partook of that awful and dead calm which nature itself derives from the grave of man; it had nothing of that peace which the Christian learns by the tomb of Christ, wherein there is release from sin by dying with His death, and in those fruits of righteousness wherein God still works, while He gives rest. Thus Christ, being dead, yet speaketh, while by His Spirit He quickeneth our mortal bodies. The world invites us to live to it; philosophy bids us to be dead to the world; but Christianity adds, in order that we may live to God, we are not only to be dead with Christ, but to learn of Him and live with Him, if we would find His rest for the soul.

III. Though the Christian be dead to the world, and so really unharmed by it, yet the world will not be dead towards him. Though unwilling, it bears testimony; and from a kind of uneasiness and fear which lies deep within it is urged to deeds of ill-will and enmity, and this is a trial to the love and faith of good but over-conscious disciples, because it seems to dishonour their Lord. But our blessed Saviour seems from the sepulchre to say: "Stand still, and see the salvation of God."

Isaac Williams, The Epistles and Gospels, vol. i., p. 386.


There are three characteristics of the risen life of our Lord which especially challenge attention.

I. Of these the first is its reality. The resurrection of Jesus Christ was a real resurrection of a dead body. Men have thought to effect a compromise between their own unbelief or half belief and the language of the apostles, by saying that Christ rose in the hearts of His disciples—that their idea of the spirit and character and work of their Master was too bright, too glorious a thing to be buried in His grave, and that when the first agony of grief was passed the Crucified One presented Himself again vividly to their loving imaginations in even more than His ancient beauty. But, supposing a process of imagination such as this to have taken place in the case of one or two or three minds, is it reasonable to suppose that it can have taken place simultaneously in a great many minds? The nearer men came to the risen Jesus the more satisfied they were that He had risen indeed. The first lesson which the risen Christ teaches the Christian is reality, genuineness.

II. A second characteristic of Christ's risen life—it lasts. Jesus did not rise that, like Lazarus, He might die again. So, too, should it be with the Christian. His, too, should be a resurrection once for all.

III. A last note of Christ's risen life. Much of it, most of it, was hidden from the eyes of men. They saw quite enough to be satisfied of its reality, but of the eleven recorded appearances five took place on a single day, and there is, accordingly, no record of any appearance on thirty-three days out of the forty which preceded the Ascension. And who can fail to see here a lesson and a law for the true Christian life? Of every such life much, and the most important side, must be hidden from the eyes of men. Alas for those who know so little of the true source of our moral force as to see in secret communion with God only the indulgence of unpractical sentiment, as to fail to connect these precious hours of silence with the beauty and strength of many of the noblest and most productive lives that have been seen in Christendom.

H. P. Liddon, Penny Pulpit, No. 429.

I. The death and burial of our Lord were but the fulfilment of His purpose when He took our flesh in the womb of the Virgin. He was in that grave before He appeared in the world. He appeared in this world that He might descend into the grave again. Every hour that He dwelt here He was giving up His body and soul, confessing that there was no life of their own in them. The glory of the Father had gone with Him through every hour of His earthly pilgrimage, raising up His body and soul, and enabling them to fulfil the work which had been given Him to do. The glory of the Father went with Him into the grave, and it brought Him back in that human soul and body, unhurt by death, unweakened by His conflict with the powers of darkness, to show forth the might of His heavenly life and to be the means through which it should be bestowed upon those for whom He died.

II. Christ's baptism was a burial: it was giving up His soul and body to death and the grave; it was "declaring life is not in them, but in Thee." Our baptism is a burial; it is a giving up of our body and soul, and declaring life is not in them, but in Him. As Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we have His glory with us to raise us from our grave, to enable us to think what of ourselves we cannot think, to do what of ourselves we cannot do. This life is given to us. It is not dependent upon the weakness of our bodies or of our souls. It is assured to us by a promise which cannot be broken. It is stored up for us in One who cannot die.

F. D. Maurice, Christmas Day and Other Sermons, p. 236.


Consider the New Life of the Believer.

I. First, in this present life, our souls begin to be drawn up to ascending desires—to nearer communion, to loftier enjoyments, to a more heavenly-mindedness. Afterwards at the resurrection, by the same process, our bodies will be raised up. When He appears in the heavens, by a necessary, irresistible, attractive force, our bodies will be raised from the grave, and we shall be "for ever with the Lord." So that the Divine life in a man's soul does not take place till there is first a death and a burial and a resurrection within him; and all that is the result of a certain union with the Lord Jesus Christ; so that Christ's death and Christ's burial and Christ's resurrection are, to that man, not only facts done for him, but things done in him, and things actually taking place at this moment, real, felt, producing direct visible results. And when we trace the secret inworkings, in a Christian's soul, of such strange, unprecedented things as these, surely to such deep and wondrous mysteries we can only justly apply the Apostle's words, and say, "It is newness of life."

II. But as the formation of it is new, so it is in its own constitution. God's way of making a new thing is not man's way. God uses up the old materials, but by His using and moulding them makes them new. What is the new element thrown in to make a new man? Love—simply love. The man receives what he feels to be an inestimable gift, and his heart goes forth after the Giver—that Giver who bought that gift for him by the purchase of His own blood.

III. Once more, the Christian life is new by reason of that ceaseless variety and never-ending progression, that constant newness which it has in it. He who has set himself to be a Christian has to do with the infinities of God. He has a field in which he can expatiate for ever, and yet never retreat one pace. He is always enlarging his sphere, and with augmented capabilities taking in extended services; he experiences the charm of a sanctified novelty; and every hour he finds a literalness in the expression in this world, as he will find it for ever and ever, "newness of life."

J. Vaughan, Sermons, 1865, No. 491.

Freshness of Being.

In everything which is really of God there is a singular freshness; it is always like that tree of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every month; there is a continual novelty. And yet some people speak of the sameness of a religious life!

I. What is newness? It is not the creation of new matter. Creations in that sense are things of the far past. It is better than creation. The old goes to make the new. The old passions, the old bias, the old elements of the natural man, go to make the strength, the elevation, of the new creation,—the same, yet not the same. Take an instance. Self is the ruling principle of every man whom the grace of God has not changed. Self is his god. Now, how is it in the Christian? He has union with Christ; therefore in him self and Christ are one. By a blessed reaction his God is now himself—his new self, his real self; his life is the life of God in his soul; his happiness is God's glory; therefore still he studies self, but self is Christ.

II. Let us trace where the newness lies. First, there is set in the believer a new motive, a new spring welling up. "I am forgiven—God loves me. How shall I repay Him?" A new current flows in the man's life-blood, he feels the springs of his immortality, he carries in him his own eternity. And he goes forth, that man, into the old world; its scenes are just the same, but a new sunshine lies upon everything—it is the medium of his new-born peace, it is a smile of God. Christ reveals Himself to him with ever-increasing clearness. And all the while he carries a happy conviction that it is inexhaustible, that his progress is to be perpetuated for ever and ever; and by faith he shall be learning more, feeling more, enjoying more, doing more, glorifying more—that for ever and ever he shall walk in newness of life.

J. Vaughan, Sermons, 2nd series, p. 141.


References: Romans 6:4.—E. Blencowe, Plain Sermons to a Country Congregation, vol. ii., p. 253; Preacher's Monthly, vol. ix., p. 1; Sermons on the Catechism, p. 219; J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 7th series, p. 9; H. P. Liddon, Easter Sermons, vol. ii., p. 19.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/romans-6.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Romans 6:4. Buried with him by baptism As the ordinance of baptism seems plainly to be sometimes represented, by sprinkling or pouring water; as particularly when God is said to save us by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost, which he shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour (Titus 3:5-6): so some have thought that it is here mentioned with an allusion to the laying of a body under water; and yet, according to this mode of reasoning, it more naturally alludes to the throwing of earth upon the dead corpse, in which the body is entirely passive, and not at all active in going down into the grave, than to plunging it into the earth or water. But, after all, I am very much of opinion with Mr. Henry, or his continuator,Dr.Evans,who, in the exposition of this passage, says, "Why this burying in baptism shouldso much as allude to any custom of dipping under water in baptism any more than our baptismal crucifixion and death should have any such reference, I confess I cannot see. It is plain, that it is not the sign, but the thing signified in baptism, that the Apostle here calls being buried with Christ; and the expression of burying alludes to Christ's burial. As Christ was buried, that he might rise to a new and more heavenly life; so we are in baptism buried, that is to say, cut off from the life of sin, that we may rise again to a new life in faith and love." Others have thought, that the reference is onlyto the benefits of spiritual baptism, and that nothing can be concluded about the external mode of baptism from this verse, more than from the next, which speaks of our being therein symbolically planted together in the likeness of Christ's death; or than from the figure of baptism saving us, as represented by the floating of Noah's ark, when the few that were in it were saved by water; 1 Peter 3:20-21. But no mode of baptism can be signified by either of these. As the church at Rome seems to have been planted about the year 43, and this Epistle was written in the year 58, that is, fifteen years after; and yet the Apostle speaks of the converted Romans in general as baptized; it must be supposed that baptism was administered to those whose parents had been Christians at the time of their birth. See Gale's Serm. vol. 2: p. 202.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/romans-6.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

To urge Christians to farther measures and degrees of mortification of sin, and living unto holiness, the apostle uses here a double argument, one from our baptism, the other from the resurrection of Christ.

Observe, 1. The argument to move us to die unto sin, drawn from our baptism; We are buried with him by baptism into death. The apostle alludes, no doubt, to the ancient manner and way of baptizing a person in those hot countries, which was by immersion, or putting them under water for a time, and then raising them up again out of the water; which rite had also a mystical signification, representing the burial of our old man sin in us, and our resurrection to newness of life.

Learn hence, That the ordinance of baptism lays every baptized person under the strongest engagements and highest obligations to die unto sin, and walk in newness of life. The metaphors of burying and rising again, do imply and intimate thus much: Burial implies a continuing under death; thus is mortification a continued act, a daily dying unto sin; and raising again, supposes a person never more to be under the power of death.

Observe, 2. Another forcible argument to encourage us to die to sin, and walk in newness of life, is drawn from the resurrection of Christ; As he was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so should we also walk in newness of life.

Here note, 1. The proposal of a pattern and examplar to us; Christ was raised from the dead.

2. The author and efficient cause of Christ's resurrection; He was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father; that is, by the glorious power of the Father; yet not without his own power as God: So Christ told the Jews, Destroy this temple of my body, and in three days I will raise it up again.

Note, 3. The conformity or similitude on our part: as Christ arose, so should we arise out of the grave of sin, and walk in newness of live.

Learn hence, That Christ's resurrection is a powerful motive, and lays a Christian under strong obligations and engagements to arise from sin, and walk in newness of life. Christ's resurrection is both a pattern and a pledge of our resurrection; a pattern after which we are to conform in our rising from the grave of sin.

Did Christ rise early and speedily? so should we: He arose early in the morning of the day, so should we in the morning of our youth; he rose voluntarily and cheerfully, so should we, rejoicing at our spiritual liberty and resolution never to die more; so should we arise, with desires and endeaveours, that spiritaul death may never more have dominion over us.

And if Christ's resurrection be thus a pattern of our resurrection now, it will be a pledge of a blessed resurrection at the last day.

Observe, lastly, The duty which every baptized person lies under an obligation to perform, in conformity ot Christ, into whose death they are baptized; and that is, to walk in the newness of life.

Where note, For our encouragement, the account which the scripture gives of the properties of the new life, which such are buried and risen with Christ, do assuredly live: And here we find it is the most noble life, the most delectable life, the most profitable life, the most holy and heavenly life: holy in its principle and motive, holy in its aim and end, holy in its rule and actings.

In a word, newness of life is a preparation for and an introduction into eternal life, and must needs be the most excellent life; for it is a life from God it is a life laid out for God, ye, it is the life which God himself lives ; and none must expect to live with him in heaven hereafter, that do no walk in newness of life but if we have our fruit unto holiness our end will be everlasting life.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/romans-6.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

4.] A further explanation of the assertion in the last verse proceeding ( οὖν) on its concession by the reader. We were then (not the temporal but inferential ‘then:’ q. d. “You grant my last position: Well then,” …) buried with Him ( καθάπερ ἔν τινι τάφῳ τῷ ὕδατι καταδυόντων ἡμῶν τὰς κεφαλὰς ὁ παλαιὸς ἄνθρωπος θάπτεται, καὶ καταδὺς κάτω κρύπτεται ὅλως καθάπαξ, Chrys. on John 3. Hom. xxv. 2, vol. viii. p. 151) by means of our baptism into (His) death ( τοῦ βαπτ. εἰς τὸν θάνατον belong together, not συνετάφ. εἰς τ. θ., which would hardly bear any sense. The absence of the art. before εἰς is no objection to this;—it is unnecessary, because no distinction from any other baptism is brought out, and τὸ βάπτ.- εἰς- τὸν- θάν. is connected as one idea); in order that, as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory ( δόξα and δύναμις are cognate ideas; compare the import of the Heb. עֹז and the LXX in Psalms 68:35 (Psa 67:34 LXX), Isaiah 12:2; and τὸ κράτος τῆς δόξης in Colossians 1:11. The divine δόξα includes all that manifests the Creator to the creature: and hence also his Almightiness. Tholuck.

The renderings ‘in Dei gloriam’ (Beza, Bretschneider), and ‘because He is the image of the Father’ (Dr. Burton, altern.), are inadmissible for διὰ with a gen.) of the Father (Theodoret makes ἡ δόξα τοῦ πατρός = ἡ οἰκεία θεότης of the Son, which is manifestly wrong), thus we also should walk in newness of life (not = ‘a new life;’—nor are such expressions ever to be diluted away thus: the abstract καινότητι is used to bring the quality of newness, which is the point insisted on, more into prominence, compare 2 Thessalonians 2:11; 1 Timothy 6:17 [and notes]; Winer, edn. 6, § 34. 3.

The comparison is not only (as Stuart) between our Lord’s physical death and resurrection, and our spiritual; but reaches far deeper: see notes on Romans 6:10-11).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/romans-6.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 6:4. An inference from Romans 6:3, by which the impossibility indicated in Romans 6:2 is now made completely evident.

Buried with Him therefore (not merely dead with Him, but, as the dead Christ was buried in order to rise again, buried with Him also) were we, in that we were baptized into His death. The recipient of baptism, who by his baptism enters into the fellowship of death with Christ, is necessarily also in the act of baptism ethically buried with Him (1 Corinthians 15:4), because after baptism he is spiritually risen with Him. In reality this burial with Him is not a moral fact distinct from the having died with Him, as actual burial is distinct from actual dying; but it sets forth the fulness and completeness of the relation, of which the recipient, in accordance with the form of baptism, so far as the latter takes place through κατάδυσις and ἀνάδυσις (see Suicer, Thes.), becomes conscious successively. The recipient—thus has Paul figuratively represented the process—is conscious, (a) in the baptism generally: now am I entering into fellowship with the death of Christ, εἰς τὸν θάνατον αὐτοῦ βαπτίζομαι; (b) in the immersion in particular: now am I becoming buried with Christ; (c) and then, in the emergence: now I rise to the new life with Christ. Comp on Colossians 2:12.

εἰς τὸν θάνατον] is necessarily, after Romans 6:3, to be joined with διὰ τοῦ βαπτίσμ., in which case, since one can say βαπτίζεσθαι εἰς τι, the connecting article was not required (comp on Galatians 3:26; Ephesians 3:13); consequently: through baptism unto death. It is not however specially the death of Christ that is again meant, as if αὐτοῦ were again annexed; but the description is generalised, agreeably to the context, in a way that could not be misunderstood. Whosoever, namely, as Paul has just set forth in Romans 6:3, has been baptized unto the death of Christ, has in fact thereby received baptism unto death; i.e. such a baptism that, taken away by it from his previous vital activity, he has become one belonging to death, one who has fallen under its sway. This however is just that relation of moral death, which, in the concrete, is the fellowship of the death of Christ. The connection with συνετάφ., in which εἰς τ. θάνατον is sometimes referred to the death of Christ (Grotius, Baumgarten-Crusius), and sometimes to the death of sin (Calovius, Wolf, Winzer, Progr. 1831), is erroneous, for this reason, that whosoever is buried does not come into death, but is in it already; and hence “the becoming buried into death” would yield quite an incongruous conception. This also applies against the expedient tried by Hofmann of making θάνατος here the death-state of Christ, unto which we were given up. Even in this view that incongruity continues:(1394) but after Romans 6:3 θάνατος can only be again death simply, not state of death (as if Paul could not have conveyed that sense by εἰς τὸ μνημεῖον, or εἰς τοὺς νεκρούς, or in some other suitable way). Observe, moreover, how Paul here also, since he has the bodily resurrection of Christ in view,(1395) mentions specially the correlative of the burial that preceded it. Comp on 1 Corinthians 15:4.

ἵνα] purpose of the συνετάφημεν.… θάνατον, and this statement of purpose has the chief importance, corresponding to the πῶς ἔτι ζήσο΄εν ἐν αὐτῇ in Romans 6:2.

διὰ τῆς δόξ. τ. πατρός] through the majesty of the Father was the resurrection of Christ brought about. The δόξα, כָּבוֹד, the glorious collective perfection of God, certainly effected the raising of Jesus chiefly as omnipotence (1 Corinthians 6:14 ; 2 Corinthians 13:4; Ephesians 1:19 f.); but the comprehensive significance of the word—selected with conscious solemnity, and in highest accordance with the glorious victory of the Son—is not to be curtailed on that account (in opposition to Koppe, Baumgarten-Crusius, and earlier expositors). According to the invariable representation of the N. T. God is the raiser of Jesus (Romans 4:24, Romans 8:11; Acts 2:24; Acts 2:31 ff. et al(1397); see on John 1:19); but yet the δόξα of God does not in this case any more than elsewhere in the N. T. denote God Himself (Langer, Judenth. in Paläst. p. 210 ff.). Erroneously however Theodoret, Theophylact, and several Fathers explain: διὰ τ. δόξ. τ. πατρ., τουτέστι διὰ τῆς οἰεκίας θεότητος. Linguistic usage admits as in itself allowable the view of Castalio and Carpzov: “in paterna gloria resurrexit,” so that διά would be used of the state; to which also van Hengel inclines. But, had Paul desired to express a relation corresponding to the ἐν καιν. ζ. in the apodosis, he must have inserted ἐν also; since the conception of the raising of Jesus through the Father was one of so solemn importance, and all the more appropriate here, since believers also owe their moral resurrection-life to the Father of Christ (Ephesians 2:10 al(1398)); it is in fact the life of regeneration. Besides, the paterna gloria was attained by Christ only through His ascension. See on Luke 24:26.

ἐν καινότητι ζωῆς] in a new (moral) constitution of life;(1399) a stronger way of bringing out the idea of καινότης, than ἐν ζωῇ καινῇ would be, for which it does not stand (in opposition to Grotius, Koppe, Reiche, and others). See Winer, p. 221 [E. T. 309]. Comp Romans 7:6. According to van Hengel ζωῆς is the genitive of apposition: “in novo rerum statu, qui vita est.” But this qui vita est is self-evident; and therefore the emphasis must remain upon καινότητι. This newness is the ethical analogue of the new estate in which Christ was alive from the dead, conceived in contrast to the παλαιότης which prevailed prior to baptism. Comp Romans 6:8.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/romans-6.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Romans 6:4. συνετάφημεν, we were buried with Him) The fruits of the burial of Christ. Immersion in baptism, or at least the sprinkling of water upon the person, represents burial, burial is a confirmation of [facit ratam] death.— εἰς, into) Construed with baptism, with which comp. Romans 6:3.— ὥσπεροὕτω, as—so) An abbreviated expression for,(56) As Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we should also rise, and as Christ reigns for ever in the glory of the Father, and in that life to which He has risen, so we also should walk in newness of life.— διὰ, by) By concerning the Father is also found at 1 Corinthians 1:9.— τῆς δόξης, the glory) δόξα is the glory of the divine life, of incorruptibility, ch. Romans 1:23, of the power and virtue, by which both Christ was raised, and we are restored to a new life, and are conformed to God, Ephesians 1:19, etc.— ἐν καινότητι, in newness) Ch. Romans 7:6; 2 Corinthians 5:15, etc. This newness consists in life.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/romans-6.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Therefore: q.d. Because we are thus dead with Christ, therefore, & c.

We are buried with him; i.e. we have communion with him in his burial also, which represents a farther degree of the destruction of sin, by putting it, as it were, out of our sight, Genesis 23:4, and having no more to do with it.

By baptism into death: he seems here to allude to the manner of baptizing in those warm Eastern countries, which was to dip or plunge the party baptized, and as it were to bury him for a while under water. See the like phrase, Colossians 2:12. Baptism doth not only represent our mortification and death to sin, but our progress and perseverance therein. Burial implies a continuing under death; so is mortification a continual dying unto sin.

That like as Christ was raised up from the dead; look as, after the death and burial of Christ, there followed his resurrection, so it must be with us; we must have communion with, and conformity to, the Lord Jesus Christ in his resurrection as well as in his death; both these are represented and sealed to us by the sacrament of baptism.

By the glory of the Father; i.e. by the power of the Father, which is called, Colossians 1:11, his glorious power. God is said elsewhere to have raised him by his power, 1 Corinthians 6:14; and in 2 Corinthians 13:4, he is said to live by the power of God. Some read it thus, he was raised from the dead, to the glory of the Father.

The preposition dia is sometimes rendered to: see 1 Peter 1:3.

Walk in newness of life; i.e. live a new life, being actuated by new principles, aiming at new ends, and bringing forth new fruits of holiness: see Romans 7:6.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Romans 6:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/romans-6.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

We also should walk in newness of life; for our death with Christ to sin implies our resurrection with Christ to God, which is to us a new life of holiness. See on verses Romans 6:10-11.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/romans-6.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

4. συνετάφημεν. Colossians 2:12 only; cf. 1 Corinthians 15:4; Acts 13:29. It is remarkable that S. Paul, alone in N.T. outside the Gospels, lays stress on the Burial: he alone was not an eyewitness of the circumstances of the Death, and therefore for him the burial was of high significance, in its evidential value.

εἰς τ. θ. Closely with τοῦ β.—through that baptism into His Death.

ἵνα. The purpose of this sharing the death and burial is negative as regards the old life of sin, but positive also, that we might enter into the atmosphere of the new life and walk in it.

δοὰ τῆς δόξης τοῦ πατρός, here δόξα is used of the manifest action of the Father in the raising of Christ; διὰ, instrum.; cf. John 11:40, Colossians 1:11. The resurrection of Christ is a revelation of the Father.

τοῦ πατρός. Cf. John 5:21; Acts 1:4; Acts 1:7; Acts 2:33 (only in A); Ephesians 2:18; Ephesians 3:14; Colossians 1:12 (?); 1 Peter 1:17; 1 John 1:2-3; 1 John 2:1; 1 John 2:15 alibi [7]; 2 Joh. [3]; Rev. [4].

The use of ὁ πατήρ absolutely is dominantly characteristic of S. John (but cf. also Matthew 11:25 f. |[144], Luke 24:36 |[145]; Matthew 28:19). It occurs in S. Paul and Acts only as above (but n. Galatians 4:6). This is the only place where it is used alone in connexion with the resurrection; and consequently it calls marked attention to the character of the resurrection as an act not of power only but of the love of the Father to His Son, and through the Son to those that are His. This thought emphasises the obligations of the new life which has its ultimate source in that love.

οὕτως therefore covers the whole thought of the ὥσπερ clause: as in rising Christ left all that was dead behind, as that rising was due to the Father’s love and power, as we share that rising, so we must leave our dead selves behind and walk etc.

ζωή is the principle of life, not the manner of life (cf. Gifford and see Lft, Igna. Romans 7); the fresh vigour of a new principle of life (cf. Romans 8:2) is the motive power of Christian conduct (περιπατήσωμεν). This is the answer to Romans 6:1.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/romans-6.html. 1896.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

4. “Therefore we have been buried along with him through baptism into death.” We find here that the baptism is the agent who executes the work of the burial into the death, which means the atonement of Christ, which is the receptacle of all sin which escapes damnation; i. e., every old man of sin must either be buried into the atonement of Christ and be left there forever, or be burned in hell fire world without end. It is astounding that Bible readers identify this baptism with the burial which is positively contradictory of Paul’s plain statement which makes the baptism the undertaker instead of the interment. “In order that, as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so may we also walk in newness of life.” Here we see that the resurrection must be homogeneous to the interment, being performed by the omnipotent power of the Holy Spirit, who raised the body of Christ from the dead. Therefore it follows as a logical sequence that the Holy Ghost Himself is the agent in both operations, i. e., the internment and the resurrection, thus clearly and demonstratively proving that this is none other than the baptism of the Holy Ghost slaying the man of sin and burying him forever into the death of Christ, the only receptacle of sin as an alternative of hell. When this old body of sin is thus forever removed, eternally buried in the death of Christ, the new man, having been resurrected in regeneration, now utterly disencumbered and free, walks on forever with God in “newness of life.” We must bear in mind that water is not mentioned in this chapter, while all the language is homogeneous with the baptism of the Spirit and out of harmony with a material transaction. If your conscience demands baptism by immersion in water, do not hesitate to satisfy your convictions in the beautiful symbolism of the material ordinance. Yet it is exceedingly pertinent that we do not mar this beautiful, clear and demonstrative statement of the supernatural baptism of the Spirit by confounding it with an outward ceremony. The thing buried in this transaction is not your physical body, which is buried in water and baptized by immersion, and the same identical body immediately raised up by the muscular power of the administrator; but that old body of sin, which is invisible and spiritual, having been crucified by the Holy Ghost in sanctification and now buried into the death, i. e., the atonement of Christ, and left there forever; because if unfortunately Satan raises him up, “the last state is worse than the first.” Hence we see the utter heterogeneity of two transactions, the internment involving the old man of sin after he has been crucified by the Holy Ghost, putting him down deep into the death of Christ, the exterminator of all sin, there to abide forever; while the new man, the son of God, created in the heart by the Holy Ghost in regeneration, is raised up to walk in newness of life forever. Hence we see that one thing is buried, so to remain forever. An infinitely different thing is the subject of the resurrection; i. e., the old man, the son of the devil, is the subject of the interment; and the new man, the son of God, the subject of the resurrection. Hence we see the impertinency in the interpretation of this Scripture as simply applying to water baptism by immersion, in which the same physical body is the subject both of the interment and the resurrection.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Godbey, William. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/romans-6.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘We were buried therefore with him through baptism into death, that like as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we also might walk in newness of life.’

Thus Spiritually as those who are ‘in Christ’ they were ‘buried with Him through baptism unto death’, dying and being buried with Him in Spiritual union with Him that they might also rise with Him. They have been united with Him in His burial so that they might experience His true death. That Christ ‘died and was buried’ was fundamental to the early church (1 Corinthians 15:3) so that His burial is the final seal on His death. Being buried with Him was proof that they had died with Him. Burial is death intensified. Thus they have ‘put on Christ’ (Galatians 3:27) in His death.

In the same way our recognition of our burial ‘with Him’ is the final seal on the fact that we recognise that we have died with Him. And this so that ‘like as Christ was raised from the dead for the glory of the Father, we also might walk in newness of life’. This newness of life can only signify life in the Spirit ‘in Christ’ (compare Romans 8:3-4; 2 Corinthians 5:17; Galatians 5:16; Galatians 5:24-25). It is the new life by which we were ‘made alive’ when all our trespasses were forgiven (Colossians 2:13), when we were ‘raised with Him through faith in the working of God Who raised Him from the dead ’ (Colossians 2:12). It is indicative of the new man who has been created in righteousness and true holiness (Ephesians 4:24; contrast the ‘old man’ in Romans 6:6 below), of the fact that in Christ we are a new creation (2 Corinthians 5:17).

‘Through the glory of the Father’ indicates the glory of the Father as revealed in what He accomplished. We might paraphrase as ‘through the Father’s glorious act whereby He revealed His glory’. It indicates the Father’s glorious power as revealed in resurrection (see Ephesians 1:17 onwards where it is the Father of glory Who raises Christ from the dead and exalts Him above all), something which brings glory to Him in His omnipotence. It indicates the demonstration of His life-giving power and righteousness (righteousness because Christ’s resurrection demonstrated both the Father’s righteousness and His own righteousness. It was because He was wholly righteous that He could be righteously raised). Compare John 17:5 where Jesus was to be raised again in order to be restored to His former glory, the glory which He had with the Father before the world was. And even to see Lazarus raised from the dead would to some extent be to see the glory of the Father (John 11:40; John 11:23). The raising of Lazarus was possible because Jesus is the resurrection and the life (John 11:25). It thus revealed the glory of the Father. Note here also the implied connection of sinlessness with the glory of the Father. Compare Romans 3:23. To sin is to come short of the glory of the Father. So to be involved in the glory of the Father is to be sinless, and to repudiate sin.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/romans-6.html. 2013.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

Therefore we are buried with him baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.

The death of Christ was the means by which sin was destroyed, and His burial the proof of the reality of His death. Christians are therefore represented as buried with Him by baptism into His death, in token that they really died with Him; and if buried with Him, it is not that they shall remain in the grave, but that, as Christ arose from the dead, they should also rise. Their baptism, then, is the figure of their complete deliverance from the guilt of sin, signifying that God places to their account the death of Christ as their own death: it is also a figure of their purification and resurrection for the service of God. By the glory of the Father. — The exercise of that almighty power of God, by which, in various passages, it is asserted that Christ was made alive again, was most glorious to God who raised Him up. Christ’s resurrection is also ascribed to Himself, because He was a partaker with the Father of that power by which He was raised. ‘I lay down my life, that I might take it again.’ ‘Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.’ To reconcile these and similar passages with those that ascribe His resurrection to the Father, it must be observed, that if the principle be regarded by which our Lord was raised up, it is to be referred to that Divine power which belongs in common to the Father and the Son. The Son was raised equally by His own power as by that of His Father, because He possessed the Divine as well as the human nature. But as in the work of redemption the Father acts as the sovereign ruler, it is He who has received the satisfaction, and who, having received it, has given to the Son its just recompense in raising Him from the dead. His resurrection, then, in this view, took place by the decree of the Eternal Father, pronounced from His judgment throne. Even so we also should walk in newness of life. — It is the purpose of our rising with Christ, that we also, by the glory or power of the Father, Corinthians 13:4, should walk in newness of life. The resurrection of Christ was the effect of the power of God, not in the ordinary way of nature, but of a supernatural exertion of power. In the same manner, believers are raised to walk in newness of life. It is thus that, when Paul, Ephesians 1:20, exalts the supernatural virtue of grace by which we are converted, he compares it to the exceeding greatness of that power by which Christ was raised from the dead. This shows the force of the Apostle’s answer to the objection he is combating. Believers are dead to the guilt of sin, and if so, the ground of their separation from God being removed His almighty power is engaged and asserted to cause them to walk with their risen Lord in that new life which they derive from Him. It was, then, the purpose of Christ’s death that His people should become dead to sin, and alive unto righteousness. ‘Who His own self bare our sins in His own body on the tree, that we being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness,’ 1 Peter 2:24. On this same ground, when viewing it simply as a motive, Paul reminds believers that since they are dead with Christ, they should set their affections on things above, and not on things on the earth, assuring them that when He who is their life shall appear, then shall they also appear with Him in glory, Colossians 3:4. And again he declares, ‘If we be dead with Him, we shall also live with Him,’ 2 Timothy 2:11.

Dr. Macknight is greatly mistaken when he applies what is said in this verse to the new life, which does not take place till after the resurrection of the body. This destroys the whole force of the Apostle’s reasoning, who is showing that believers cannot continue in sin, not only as they are dead to sin, but as they are risen with Christ, thus receiving a new and supernatural life, for the purpose of walking in obedience to God.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/romans-6.html. 1835.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4. Therefore—Since we die, a cognate burial must follow. The faith which precedes baptism produces a death; the holiness which should follow is a newness of life, a resurrection.

Buried… by baptism—Where our regenerating faith is a death, and our sanctified new life is a resurrection, what should be the fitting burial between the two? Obviously, as said in Romans 6:2, our baptism consecrating us into Christ, embodying us into his mystical body the Church, is the burial. Faith insures our mystical death, baptism our mystical burial, sanctification our mystical resurrection.

This mystical burial would be accomplished with equal completeness whether the rite of baptism were performed by affusion or immersion. For, 1. Christ was not buried at all, but temporarily deposited in a new tomb preparatory to burial. 2. A burial is as well symbolized by affusion, picturing the covering over of the body, as by immersion. The amount of water poured upon the body can make no difference; for in Rome, whither this epistle was sent, a handful of dust thrice flung upon a corpse was held to be a legal ritual burial. So in the parallel passage, Colossians 2:11-12, so minute a rite as circumcision is the figure of an entire “putting off the body of the sins of the flesh.” 3. Immersion, even if it represented burial, does not symbolize the outpoured baptism of the Spirit. Affusion represents both.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/romans-6.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 6:4. Therefore we were buried with him through baptism. A stronger expression than that of the last verse. That the custom of baptism by immersion is alluded to is generally admitted, but the emersion is as significant as the immersion. The death of the old man is at the same time the birth of the new. One form may be more striking than another, may have the earliest usage in its favor; but it seems improper to make the efficacy of the rite depend upon the quantity of water, or upon the mode of its application.

Into his death; for the appropriation of its full benefit, namely, the remission of sins and reconciliation with God.

In order that, as Christ was raised up, etc. The death and resurrection of Christ stand together; so the Christian who is in fellowship with Christ, shares in his life.

Through the glory of the Father. ‘The glorious collective perfection of God certainly affected the raising of Jesus chiefly as omnipotence (1 Corinthians 6:14; 2 Corinthians 13:4; Ephesians 1:19, etc.); but the comprehensive significance of the word—selected with conscious solemnity, and in highest accordance with the glorious victory of the Son—is not to be curtailed on that account’ (Meyer).

In newness of life; this is more emphatic than ‘a new life’; a life which never grows old, whose characteristic ‘newness’ is imperishable.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/romans-6.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Romans 6:4. This symbolism interpreted. συνετάφημεν οὖν αὐτῷ κ. τ. λ.: Therefore we were buried with Him (in the act of immersion) through that baptism into His death—burial being regarded as the natural sequence of death, and a kind of seal set to its reality. Cf. 1 Corinthians 15:3 f. It introduces a false abstraction to say (with Meyer) that εἰς τὸν θάνατον means “unto death,” not “unto His death”: death in the whole context is perfectly definite. διὰ τῆς δόξης τοῦ πατρός: in nothing was the splendour of God’s power revealed so much as in the resurrection of Jesus, Ephesians 1:19 f. ἐν καινότητι ζωῆς: in life of a new quality; cf. Romans 7:6, 1 Timothy 6:17 : the construction makes the new quality of the life prominent. Winer, p. 296.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/romans-6.html. 1897-1910.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Romans 6:4 We were buried therefore with him through baptism unto death: that like as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we also might walk in newness of life.

"Buried therefore with him through baptism unto death"-a parallel is drawn between the burial and resurrection of Christ and the death and resurrection of the Christian ("that like as").

"Therefore"-as a natural consequence of death.

"Buried"-one more proof that the correct mode of baptism is immersion. (Colossians 2:12)

"Through the glory of the Father"-"by the Father"s glorious power" (Wey) (Ephesians 1:19)

"So we also might walk in newness of life"-

"Walk"-"live an entirely new life" (Wey). (2 Corinthians 5:17); "So we too might habitually live and behave in newness of life" (Amp). Lit., walk about, implying habitual conduct (Vincent p. 67)

"Newness"-2538. kainotes {kahee-not"-ace}; from 2537; renewal (figuratively): -newness. In life of a new quality (Gr. Ex. N.T. p. 633) ()

In baptism one comes into contact with the benefits of Christ"s death (a death designed to atone for sins-hence how could those baptized ever logically argue that they had the right to keep on sinning?); the result being a spiritual resurrection of the believer from "dead in sin", to "alive in Christ". (Ephesians 2:1-9; Colossians 2:12-13). Hence baptism symbolizes the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ. BAPTISM ISN"T THE outward sign of an inward grace, rather is the act that brings the believer into contact with benefits of Christ"s death and resurrection.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/romans-6.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

are = were.

buried with. Greek. sunthapto. Only here and Colossians 2:12.

by. App-104.

baptism. App-115.

Christ. App-98.

raised up. App-178.

from. App-104.

dead. App-139.

glory. i.e. glorious power.

Father. App-98.

newness. Greek. kainotes. Only here and Romans 7:6.

life. App-170.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/romans-6.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.

Therefore we are buried with him , [ sunetafeemen (Greek #4916)] - rather, 'we were buried with Him;' for the thing is viewed as a past act, done and completed at once on their reception of the Gospel, and baptismally sealed on their profession of it,

By baptism into death. It is thus that this and the preceding clauses must be separated, to make the sense clear. It is not, 'by baptism we are buried with Him into death,' which makes no sense at all; but 'by baptism with Him into death we are buried with Him;' in other words, 'by the same baptism which publicly enters us into His death, we are made partakers of His burial also.' To leave a dead body unburied is represented, alike in pagan authors as in Scripture, as the greatest indignity (Revelation 11:8-9). It was fitting, therefore, that Christ, after "dying for our sins according to the Scriptures," should "descend into the lower parts of the earth" (Ephesians 4:9). As this was the last and lowest step of His humiliation, so it was the honourable dissolution of His last link of connection with that life which He laid down for us; and we, in being 'buried with Him by our baptism into his death,' have by this public act severed our last link of connection with that whole sinful condition and life which Christ brought to an end in His death.

That like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father - or, by such a forth-putting of the Father's power as made that act to be the effulgence of the Father's whole glory. Compare 1 Corinthians 6:14; 2 Corinthians 13:4; Ephesians 1:19, etc. So nearly all good critics. (Beza erroneously renders dia (Greek #1223) tees (Greek #3588) doxees (Greek #1391), 'into, the glory of the Father'. See Grotius, Fritzsche, and Meyer, on this use of the word.) The resurrection of Christ is here, as generally in the New Testament, ascribed to the Father, who therein proclaimed His judicial satisfaction with and acceptance of His whole work in the flesh.

Even so we also should walk in newness of life. The parallel here is not (as the apostle's language might seem to say) between Christ's resurrection and our walking in newness of life, but between Christ's resurrection and our resurrection to newness of life-henceforth to walk in it. Believers, immediately on their union to the risen Saviour, rise to a new resurrection-life-the life, in fact, of their risen Lord-as is once and again emphatically expressed in the sequel. Here, taking this for granted, the apostle advances to the practical development of this new life, saying, in effect, 'That like as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also, risen with Him, should, as new creatures, walk conformably.' But what is that "newness?" Surely if our old life, now dead, and buried with Christ, was wholly sinful, the new, to which we rise with the risen Saviour, must be altogether a holy life; so that every time we go back to "those things whereof we are now ashamed" (Romans 6:21), we belie our resurrection with Christ to newness of life, and "forget, that we have been purged from our old sins" (2 Peter 1:9). Whether the mode of baptism by immersion be alluded to in this verse, as a kind of symbolical burial and resurrection, does not seem to us of much consequence. Many interpreters think it is; and it may be so. But since it is not clear that baptism in apostolic times was exclusively by immersion (see Acts 2:41), so sprinkling and washing are indifferently used in the New Testament to express the cleansing efficacy of the blood of Jesus. And just as the woman with the issue of blood got virtue out of Christ by simply touching Him, so the essence of baptism seems to lie in the simple contact of the element with the body, symbolizing living contact with Christ crucified; the mode and extent of suffusion being indifferent and variable with climate and circumstances.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/romans-6.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

4. We were buried with him and shared his death. A burial implies death. Baptism is a burial. As death and burial terminate physical life, Paul reasons, so should baptism into Christ terminate our "love affair" with sin. [The original mode of baptism was immersion - a burial in water (and the Spirit, John 3:5).] In order that. God's power raised Christ from death. He now lives a new life in heaven. Paul says this is what our baptism means to us. We die to sin, are buried, and raise from the liquid grave to live a new life. Compare 2 Corinthians 5:17.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/romans-6.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) We are buried with him.—Burial, is the consequence of death. It is the seal set upon it, as it were, which shows that no revival is possible. Besides, it is the one step which separates it from resurrection. The idea of “buried with Christ” is therefore introduced, on the one hand, to show that the ethical death with Him was final and decisive, and on the other, to prepare the way for an ethical (as well as physical) resurrection with Him.

Into death.—The ideas of physical and moral death and resurrection and life are inextricably blended in the thought of the Apostle.

By the glory of the Father.—The resurrection of Christ is more usually and more naturally ascribed to the power or Omnipotence of God. The word “Glory” is here to be taken as standing for the sum of the divine perfections, power being included among them, “the Majesty on High.”

Even so.—It is to be observed that the mysticism is here resolved into a relation of resemblance. The resurrection of Christ, and the new life of the Christian, are compared instead of being identified. The Apostle does not say “being dead with Christ, let us rise with Him;” but, “as Christ rose again, so we also should walk in newness of life.” The mystical expression for this is given in the next verse.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/romans-6.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.
we are
3; Colossians 2:12,13; 3:1-3; 1 Peter 3:21
that
9; 8:11; 1 Corinthians 6:14; 2 Corinthians 13:4; Ephesians 1:19,20; 2:5,6
by the
Matthew 28:2,3; John 2:11,19,20; 11:40; Colossians 1:11
even
19; 7:6; 12:1,2; 13:13,14; 2 Corinthians 5:17; Galatians 6:15,16; Ephesians 4:17,22-24; 5:8; Philippians 3:17,18; Colossians 1:9-12; 2:11,12; 3:10; 4:1; 1 Peter 4:1,2; 2 Peter 1:4-9; 1 John 2:6

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/romans-6.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death. This is an inference from Romans 6:3, to confirm the proposition in ver 2, viz. that those dead in sin cannot live therein. Therefore, says the apostle, such being the nature of our union with Christ, expressed in baptism, it follows, that those who are baptized are buried with Christ; they are as effectually shut out from the kingdom of Satan, as those who are in the grave are shut out from the world. The words διὰ τοῦ βαπτίσμαπος εἰς τὸν θάνατον go together; by baptism unto death, i.e. by a baptism which has reference to Christ's death, and by which we are associated with him therein. We are buried with him, i.e. we are cut off from the world in and with him. If the words unto death are connected with we were buried, the sense would be, we were buried unto death, i.e. we were buried so as to come into the power of death. But this is an incongruous idea, and an unexampled form of expression. As in Romans 6:3 the apostle had said εἰς τὸν θάνατον αὐτοῦ ἐβαπτισθημεν, there is no reason to doubt that he here designs to speak of baptism unto death. Compare Colossians 2:12, "buried with him in baptism." The same idea is expressed in Romans 6:8, by saying, "we are dead with him," and in Romans 6:5, "we are planted with him in the likeness of his death." It is not necessary to assume that there is any reference here to the immersion of the body in baptism, as though it were a burial. No such allusion can be supposed in the next verse, where we are said to be planted with him. The reference is not to the mode of baptism, but to its effect. Our baptism unites us to Christ, so that we died with him, and rose with him. As he died to sin, so do we; as he rose to righteousness and glory, so do we. The same doctrine concerning baptism, and of the nature of union with Christ, therein expressed, is taught in Galatians 3:27, and Colossians 2:12.

That like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. We die with Christ, in order that we should live with him. We share in his death, that we may be partakers of his life. Justification is in order to sanctification. The two are inseparable. There can be no participation in Christ's life without a participation in his death, and we cannot enjoy the benefits of his death unless we are partakers of the power of his life. We must be reconciled to God in order to be holy, and we cannot be reconciled without thereby becoming holy. Antinomianism, or the doctrine that the benefits of the atonement can be enjoyed without experiencing the renewing of the Holy Ghost, is therefore contrary to the very nature and design of redemption. As Christ died and rose again literally, so his people die and rise spiritually. As Christ's resurrection was the certain consequence of his death, so is a holy life the certain consequence of our dying with Christ. There is not only an analogy between Christ's literal death and resurrection, and the spiritual death and resurrection of the believer, but there is a causal relation between the two. The death and resurrection of Christ render certain the justification and sanctification of his people. Paul says Christ rose, διὰ τῆς δὸξης τοῦ πατρός, by the glory of the Father. δόξα, glory, is the excellence of God, the sum of all his perfections, or any one perfection specially manifested. The exhibition, therefore, of God's holiness, or of his mercy, or of his power, is equally an exhibition of his glory. Here the reference is to his omnipotence, which was gloriously displayed in the resurrection of Christ. In 1 Corinthians 6:14, and 2 Corinthians 13:4, it is said Christ was raised ἐκ δυνάμεως θεου~, by the power of God. In Colossians 1:11, the apostle refers the sanctification of believers to the κράτος τῆς δόξης θεου~, to the power of his glory. It is according to the analogy of Scripture, that the same event is attributed at one time to the efficiency of the Father, and at another to that of the Son. Christ rose from the dead by his own power. He had power to lay down his life, and he had power to take it again. This is perfectly consistent with the apostle's declaration, that he was raised by the power of God. The three persons of the Trinity are one God. The efficiency of the Father is also the efficiency of the Son. What the Father does, the Son also does. That we should walk in newness of life, ἐν καινότητι ζωῆς. The idea of purity is associated with that of newness in the word of God — a new heart, a new creature, the new man. Newness of life is a life that is new, compared with what is natural and original; and it is a holy life, springing from a new source. It is not we that live, but Christ that liveth in us; and therefore our life is, in its manifestations, analogous to his. His people are like him.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on Romans 6:4". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/romans-6.html.

: We were buried therefore with him through baptism unto death: that like as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we also might walk in newness of life.

In order to enter into Christ's death, one must be "buried" (sunthapto), a word occurring only here and Colossians 2:12. This is an interesting word because it meant "to bury with someone" or "be buried together with another" (CBL, GED, 6:201). Kittle (7:786) says "to bury with, together, at the same time." The preceding diagram illustrates this entombment. One can only share in the likeness of Christ's death, burial and resurrection if he dies to sin (i.e. changes his life through repentance), is buried (immersed) by baptism, and is raised up (comes up out of the water). Paul was emphatic on this point because he said "through" (dia) "baptism." Translators of the KJV rendered the text "by baptism."

The word baptized (baptisma) is identical to the word in verse3 , only here it is a noun and in verse3it is a verb. Like the verb baptize, baptism is not a translation of the Greek text; it is a transliteration. This means the Greek letters of the word used by Paul were given their English equivalent. This was necessary because "there was no equivalent [word, BP] in our language….To baptize is to put into water and take out again. It involves immersion, submersion, and emergence-death, burial, and resurrection" (Vine, ). This definition of baptism, when combined with John 3:23, shows that it must be a burial (immersion). Sprinkling water on someone's head or pouring water on people is not Bible baptism. God has given us a pattern ( 2 Timothy 1:13), part of this pattern involves baptism ( Romans 6:1-4), and this pattern must be followed.

Turner (p37) said the word baptized "is peculiar to Christianity. It represents a rite performed in water involving repentance and the remission of sins. It was administered by both John the Baptist and the Christians. The verb is more frequently used than the noun for the Christian rite and, though it was originally a pagan word, it has become peculiarly Christianized." For additional information on Bible baptism see the commentary on Acts 2:38.

After someone has been properly baptized, the fourth verse states that his or her life is "new" (kainotes). The Bible Knowledge Commentary says this term "speaks of life that has a new or fresh quality. The resurrection of Jesus was not just a resuscitation; it was a new form of life. In the same way the spiritual lives of believers in Jesus have a new, fresh quality" (p462). The word Paul used "is from kainos, new in quality, which is to be distinguished from neos, new in time" (Vine, ). Aside from this verse and Romans 7:6, this term is not found in the New Testament. It "denotes the fullness of the reality of salvation which Christ has given to Christians in comparison with the worthlessness of their former condition" (Kittle, 3:451) and refers "to one's manner of living" (CBL, GED, 3:212). Because of our new life we are obligated to "walk" (peripateo), a common word occurring in most of the New Testament books "and denotes the general life-style-ethical, moral, religious" (CBL, GED, 5:158).

McGuiggan (p192-193) said, "The ‘also' indicates that Jesus too lived a life of newness. Before his resurrection he lived the life of a servant, struggling against sin in order to be victorious over it. But because of his utter obedience he was given a glorious resurrection and glorious life. The saint identifies himself with all that. As his Master was ‘born again' from the dead ( Revelation 1:5; Colossians 1:18) even so the sinner had been ‘born again' as he (by faith) entered into union with the death and resurrection of Christ."

Before baptism a person has the devil as his or her spiritual father and master ( John 8:44). The unsaved are bondservants to sin ( John 8:34). People belong to the devil. However, in baptism, sinners are united with Christ, their relationship with sin is severed, and entrance into Christ occurs. The information in Romans 6:1-23 is parallel to 2 Corinthians 5:17.

Nygren (p235) noted that Paul gave a positive and negative picture of baptism. Baptism is negative in that those who experience it must die because Jesus died. Baptism is also positive in that it is compared to a resurrection, another thing experienced by Jesus.

Barclay ( Romans , p86), lists what he calls three great permanent truths:

"It is a terrible thing to make the mercy of God an excuse for sinning. Think of it in human terms. How despicable it would be for a son or a daughter to consider himself or herself free to sin, because he or she knew that a father or a mother would forgive. That would be taking advantage of love to break love's heart."

"The man who enters upon the Christian way is committed to a different kind of life....In modern times we have tended to stress the fact that acceptance of the Christian way need not make so very much difference in a man's life. Paul would have said that it ought to make all the difference in the world."

Ø "There is a real union with a real identification with Christ…A man is in Christ."

Although not mentioned by Barclay, there are four great truths in this verse. Paul said Jesus was raised "from" (ek) the dead. This preposition indicates Jesus was really among the dead. He actually went to the place of the deceased (Hades), but He broke the bonds of death. This affirmation is in contrast to some of the false theories used by skeptics to explain the resurrection (i.e. Jesus "swooned" but did not actually die). A story is told about a worshipper who heard a preacher say Jesus really didn't die; He merely lost consciousness and was revived by the disciples. When she asked others for comment she received this reply: "Beat your preacher with a cat-of-nine-tails with39 heavy strokes; nail him to a cross; hang him in the sun for6 hours; run a spear through His side, and then put Him in an airless tomb for36 hours."

Paul associated Jesus' return from the dead with the "Father's glory." Spicq () says "This glory is God in the splendor of his majesty and the omnipotence of his interventions." Brown (2:46) concurs by saying the thought points to "God's glory, majesty and power."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Price, Brad "Commentary on Romans 6:4". "Living By Faith: Commentary on Romans". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bpc/romans-6.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Tuesday, January 22nd, 2019
the Second Week after Epiphany
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology