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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Zechariah 11:1

Open your doors, O Lebanon, That a fire may feed on your cedars.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Open thy doors, O Lebanon - I will give Mr. Joseph Mede's note upon this verse: -

"That which moveth me more than the rest, is in chap. 11, which contains a prophecy of the destruction of Jerusalem, and a description of the wickedness of the inhabitants, for which God would give them to the sword, and have no more pity upon them. It is expounded of the destruction by Titus; but methinks such a prophecy was nothing seasonable for Zachary's time, (when the city yet for a great part lay in her ruins, and the temple had not yet recovered hers), nor agreeable to the scope. Zachary's commission, who, together with his colleague Haggai, was sent to encourage the people, lately returned from captivity, to build their temple, and to instaurate their commonwealth. Was this a fit time to foretell the destruction of both, while they were yet but a-building? And by Zachary too, who was to encourage them? Would not this better befit the desolation by Nebuchadnezzar?" I really think so. See Mr. J. Mede's 61. Epistle.

Lebanon signifies the temple, because built of materials principally brought from that place.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/zechariah-11.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Open thy doors, O Lebanon - Lebanon, whose cedars had stood, its glory, for centuries, yet could offer no resistance to him who felled them and were carried off to adorn the palaces of its conquerors (see above at Zephaniah 2:14, and note 2. p. 276), was in Isaiah Isaiah 14:8; Isaiah 37:24 and Jeremiah Jeremiah 22:6-7 the emblem of the glory of the Jewish state; and in Ezekiel, of Jerusalem, as the prophet himself explains it Ezekiel 17:3, Ezekiel 17:12; glorious, beauteous, inaccessible, so long as it was defended by God; a ready prey, when abandoned by Him. The center and source of her strength was the worship of God; and so Lebanon has of old been understood to be the temple, which was built with cedars of Lebanon, towering aloft upon a strong. summit; the spiritual glory and the eminence of Jerusalem, as Lebanon was of the whole country, and, “to strangers who came to it, it appeared from afar like a mountain full of snow; for, where it was not gilded, it was exceeding white, being built of marble.” But at the time of destruction it was “a den of thieves” Matthew 21:13, as Lebanon, amidst its beauty, was of wild beasts.

Rup.: “I suppose Lebanon itself, that is, “the temple,” felt the command of the prophet‘s words, since, as its destruction approached, its doors opened without the hand of man. Josephus relates how, “at the passover, the eastern gate of the inner temple, being of brass and very firm, and with difficulty shut at eventide by twenty men; moreover with bars strengthened with iron, and having very deep bolts, which went down into the threshold, itself of one stone, was seen at six o‘clock at night to open of its own accord. The guards of the temple running told it to the officer, and he, going up, with difficulty closed it. This the uninstructed thought a very favorable sign, that God opened to them the gate of all goods. But those taught in the divine words, understood that the safety of the temple was removed of itself, and that the gate opened.”

A saying of this sort is still exstant.: “Our fathers have handed down, forty years before the destruction of the house, the lot of the Lord did not come up on the right hand, and the tongue of splendor did not become white, nor did the light from the evening burn, and the doors of the temple opened of their own accord, until Rabbi Johanan ben Zaccai rebuked them, and said, ‹O temple, why dost thou affright thyself? I know of thee that thy end is to be destroyed, and of this Zechariah prophesied, “Open thy doors, O Lebanon, and let the fire devour thy cedars.‘” The “forty years” mentioned in this tradition carry back the event exactly to the Death of Christ, the temple having been burned 73 a.d.. Josephus adds that they opened at the passover, the season of His Crucifixion. On the other hand, the shutting of the gates of the temple, when they had “seized Paul and dragged him out of the temple” Acts 21:30, seems miraculous and significant, that, having thus violently refused the preaching of the Gospel, and cast Paul out, they themselves were also shut out, denoting that an entrance was afterward to be refused them.

And let afire devour thy cedars - Jerusalem, or the temple, were, after those times, burned by the Romans only. The destruction of pride, opposed to Christ, was prophesied by Isaiah in connection with His Coming Isaiah 10:34; Isaiah 11:1.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/zechariah-11.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

This chapter has a dramatic and sudden warning in shocking contrast to the glorious promises revealed in the previous two chapters, fully in keeping with the pattern in all the sacred writings of depicting blessing and punishment side by side, alternating from one to the other. The Saviour himself recognized and used exactly that same device. For example, the same chapter speaks of heaven and hell, blessing and cursing, light and darkness, etc.; and this invariable pattern appears in practically all of the prophets. Thus Zechariah is absolutely consistent in moving from the glorious promises just related to this sorrowful prophecy of the final overthrow and destruction of the Chosen People, the removal of their government, the destruction of vast numbers of their population, and the delivery of those that remained into the hands of the false shepherds they had preferred to the True Shepherd.

This is one of the easiest chapters in the Bible to interpret, due to the inspired Matthew having applied the central incident in the chapter to the betrayal of Jesus Christ for thirty pieces of silver by Judas Iscariot (Matthew 27:3-10). With that as the key to the whole chapter, the whole passage unravels with remarkable boldness and clarity.

It is amusing that liberal commentators who cannot find Jesus Christ anywhere in this chapter are unanimous in their declaration that the chapter "is difficult," "no concensus is possible," "it is impossible to identify these," etc., etc. For example, in the case of the "three shepherds" removed in a month (Zechariah 11:8), more than forty opinions have been expressed by the greatest liberal scholars of this century concerning the interpretation of them. All such confusion merely demonstrates that when the obvious, central meaning of Zechariah 11 is ignored, the whole passage becomes impossible of any intelligent explanation. We are thankful for the clear vision and vital faith of many of the older commentators who do not hesitate to interpret the chapter as a reference to the rejection of Christ by Israel. Jamieson gave the whole chapter a single rifle: "The Destruction of the Second Temple and the Jewish Polity for their Rejection of the Messiah."[1] Amen! That is what every word of this chapter is about. Deane titled the three subsections of the chapter thus:[2]

"I. The Holy Land is threatened with judgment (Zechariah 11:1-3).

II. The punishment falls upon the people of Israel because they rejected the Good Shepherd (personified by the prophet) (Zechariah 11:4-14).

III. In retribution for their rejection of the Good Shepherd, the people are given over to a foolish shepherd who shall destroy them, but shall himself, in turn, perish miserably (Zechariah 11:15-17)."SIZE>

Robinson summarized Zechariah 11 with one sentence: "Israel is to be punished for rejecting the shepherding care of Jehovah."[3] Feinberg's summary has this:

"The events of this chapter are set in the time of the earthly ministry of the Shepherd of Israel, and his rejection by them, with its consequences in 70 A.D. They speak of the dark hour of Israel's national history."[4]

We concur fully in such views of this chapter and find it incredible, really, that the hodge-podge of contradictory, foolish, unreasonable, and preposterous interpretations of critical scholars should be received as acceptable by any believer in the Lord Jesus Christ. Denials of this chapter's reference to Jesus Christ during his earthly ministry, due to their phenomenal weakness, are not even effective crutches of infidelity.

Zechariah 11:1

"Open thy doors, O Lebanon, that the fire may devour thy cedars."

The Jewish temple was made of cedars of Lebanon, and from this some have seen a reference here to the destruction of the Second Temple. Oddly enough, the Jews themselves so interpreted it. Josephus relates the story of how the massive doors of the temple "opened of their own accord at Passover,"[5] some forty years before the temple's destruction, corresponding exactly to the time of the Crucifixion; Maimonides, one of the Jewish authors, has an account of Rabbi Johannan's remark concerning that prodigy. He said:

"Now I know that the destruction of the temple is at hand, according to the prophecy of Zechariah, "Open thy doors, O Lebanon! that the fire may devour thy cedars."[6]

Now it must be freely admitted that Josephus' tales of several fantastic prodigies that occurred prior to the fall of Jerusalem to the Romans are not held to be reliable; still this particular one occurred forty years previously at the time of Jesus' crucifixion, and there is trustworthy evidence from the New Testament itself that "the veil of the temple was rent in twain" (Matthew 27:51) upon what might have been exactly the same occasion.

However one takes Josephus' story, there does not appear to be any good reason for denying Rabbi Johannan's reference to this prophecy as applicable to the temple. Certainly, this is as reasonable as any of the wild guesses about which kings, whether the Ptolemies, the Seleucids, the Romans, etc. are prophetically represented in this verse.

Whether the gate of the temple, the gate of Palestine through Lebanon, or some other "door" is spoken of here; the import of the message is tragic. Disaster is in store for Israel. Matthew Henry also mentioned the traditions we have cited and said,

"Open thy doors, O Lebanon! thou wouldst not open them to let thy King come in (He came to his own, and his own received him not); now thou must open them to let thy ruin in. Let the gates of the forest, and all the avenues to it be thrown open, and let the fire come in and devour its glory.[7]

These three verses (Zechariah 11:1-3) present in a vigorous picture a scene of complete judgment and devastation upon the land to which such fair things had been promised in Zechariah 9-10. To this literal understanding of the passage we ought to adhere."[8]SIZE>

Marvelous and wonderful things concerning God's Israel had been depicted in the two preceding chapters; but now all of that is held up in abeyance; for Israel would reject the only One who could bring all of those beautiful things to pass. The wail of despair that goes up from these three verses is starkly clear in the howling of the false shepherds.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/zechariah-11.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Open thy doors, O Lebanon,.... By which may be meant, either the temple of Jerusalem, which was built of the cedars of Lebanon;

"the gates of which are saidF23T. Bab. Yoma, fol. 39. 2. to open of themselves forty years before the destruction of Jerusalem, when Jochanan ben Zaccai, who lived at the same time, rebuked them, saying, O temple, temple, wherefore dost thou frighten thyself? I know thine end is to be destroyed; for so prophesied Zechariah, the son of Iddo, concerning thee, "open thy doors, O Lebanon".'

So Lebanon, in Zechariah 10:10, is interpreted of the sanctuary, both by the Targum and by Jarchi; or else it may be understood of Jerusalem, and of the whole land of Judea, because it was situated by it; it was the border of it on the north side.

That the fire may devour thy cedars; of which the temple was built, and the houses of Jerusalem, which were consumed by fire; unless the fortresses of the land are meant. So the Targum paraphrases it,

"and the fire shall consume your fortresses.'


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/zechariah-11.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Open thy doors, O a Lebanon, that the fire may devour thy cedars.

(a) Because the Jews thought themselves so strong by reason of this mountain, that no enemy could come to hurt them, the Prophet shows that when God sends the enemies, it will show itself ready to receive them.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/zechariah-11.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Zechariah 11:1-17. Destruction of the second Temple and Jewish polity for the rejection of Messiah.

Open thy doors, O Lebanon — that is, the temple so called, as being constructed of cedars of Lebanon, or as being lofty and conspicuous like that mountain (compare Ezekiel 17:3; Habakkuk 2:17). Forty years before the destruction of the temple, the tract called “Massecheth Joma” states, its doors of their own accord opened, and Rabbi Johanan in alarm said, I know that thy desolation is impending according to Zechariah‘s prophecy. Calvin supposes Lebanon to refer to Judea, described by its north boundary: “Lebanon,” the route by which the Romans, according to Josephus, gradually advanced towards Jerusalem. Moore, from Hengstenberg, refers the passage to the civil war which caused the calling in of the Romans, who, like a storm sweeping through the land from Lebanon, deprived Judea of its independence. Thus the passage forms a fit introduction to the prediction as to Messiah born when Judea became a Roman province. But the weight of authority is for the former view.


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/zechariah-11.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Open thy doors, O Lebanon, that the fire may devour thy cedars.

Open thy doors — That destruction of the Jewish church and nation, is here foretold in dark and figurative expressions, which our Lord, when the time was at hand, prophesied of very plainly.

Lebanon — Lebanon, a great mountain boundary between Judea and its neighbours on the north, is here commanded to open its gates, its fortifications raised to secure the passages, which lead into Judea.

That the fire — Fire kindled by the enemy in the houses and buildings in Judea, and in Lebanon itself.

The cedars — Palaces built with cedars.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/zechariah-11.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

This Chapter contains severe threatenings, by which God designed in time to warn the Jews, that if there was any hope of repentance, they might be restored by fear to the right way, and that others, the wicked and the reprobate, might be rendered inexcusable, and also that the faithful might fortify themselves against the strong temptation to despond on seeing so dreadful a calamity awaiting that nation.

This prophecy does not indeed seem consistent with the preceding prophecies; for the Prophet has been hitherto not only encouraging the people to entertain hope, but has also declared that their condition would be so happy that nothing would be wanting to render them really blessed: but now he denounces ruin, and begins with reprobation; for he says, that God had been long the shepherd of that nation, but that now he renounced all care of them; for being wearied he would no longer bear with that perverse wickedness, which he had found in them all. These things seem to be inconsistent: but we may observe, that it was needful in the first place to set before the Jews the benefits of God, that they might with more alacrity proceed with the work of building the temple, and know that their labor would not be in vain; and now it was necessary to change the strain, lest hypocrites, vainly confiding in these promises, should become hardened, as it is commonly the case; and also, lest the faithful should not entertain due fear, and thus go heedlessly before God; for nothing is more ruinous than security, inasmuch as when a license is taken to sin, God’s judgment impends over us. We hence see how useful and reasonable was this warnings of the Prophet, as he made the Jews to understand, that God would not be propitious to his people without punishing their wickedness and obstinacy.

In order to render his prophecy impressive, Zechariah addresses Libanon; as though he was God’s herald, he bids it to open its gates, for the whole wood was now given up to the fire. Had he spoken without a figure, his denunciation would not have had so much force: he therefore denounces near ruin on Lebanon and on other places. Almost all think that by Lebanon is to be understood the temple, because it was built with timber from that mountain; but this view seems to me frigid, though it is approved by the common consent of interpreters. For why should we think the temple to be metaphorically called Lebanon rather than Bashan? And they think so such thing of Bashan, though there is equally the same reason. I therefore regard it simply as the Mount Lebanon; and I shall merely refer to what Joseph us declares, that the temple was opened before the city was destroyed by Titus. But though that history may be true, and it seems to me probable, it does not hence follow that this prophecy was then fulfilled, according to what is said of Rabbi Jonathan, who then exclaimed, “Lo! the prophecy of Zechariah; for he foretold that the temple would be burnt, and that the gates would be previously opened.” These things seem plausible, and at the first view gain our approbation. But I think that we must understand something more solid, and less refined: for I doubt not but that the Prophet denounces complete ruin on Mount Lebanon, and on Bashan and other places. (129)

But why does he bid Lebanon to open its gates? The reason is given, for shortly after he calls it a fortified forest, which was yet without walls and gates. Lebanon, we know, was nigh to Jerusalem, though far enough to be free from any hostile attack. As then the place was by nature sufficiently safe from being assailed, the Prophet speaks, as though Lebanon was surrounded by fortresses; for it was not exposed to the attacks of enemies. The meaning is, — that though on account of its situation the Jews thought that Lebanon was not exposed to any evils, yet the wantonness of enemies would lead them even there. We have already said why the Prophet bids Lebanon to open its gates, even because he puts on the character of a herald, who threatens and declares, that God’s extreme vengeance was already nigh at hand.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/zechariah-11.html. 1840-57.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This Chapter in its opening, seems to contain a prophecy of the siege and destruction of Jerusalem, and which took place after our Lord's return to glory. Under the figures of two staves the Lord teacheth concerning his Church.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/zechariah-11.html. 1828.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Zechariah 11:1 Open thy doors, O Lebanon, that the fire may devour thy cedars.

Ver. 1. Open thy doors, O Lebanon] This chapter is no less comminatory than the two former had been consolatory. The tartness of the threatening maketh men best taste the sweetness of the promise. Sour and sweet make the best sauce; promises and threatenings mingled serve to keep the heart in the best temper. Hypocrites catch at the promises, as children do at deserts; and stuff themselves therewith a pillow as it were, that they may sin more securely. Here therefore they are given to understand, that God will so be merciful to the penitent, as that he will by no means clear the guilty. That is the last letter in God’s name, Exodus 34:7, and must never be forgotten. It is fitting that the wicked should be forewarned of their danger; and the godly forearmed. This chapter hangs over Jerusalem as that blazing star in the form of a bloody sword is said to have done for a whole year’s time, a little before that last destruction of it, that is here foretold five hundred years before it happened.

Open thy doors, O Lebanon] i.e. Lay open thou thyself to utter ruin; for it is determined, and cannot be avoided. Lebanon was the confine of the country on that side, whereby the Romans made their first irruption, as by an inlet. Doors or gates are attributed to this forest; because against Libanus is set Antilibanus, another mountain; which is joined into it as it were with a certain wall; so that these were and are narrow passages and gates, kept sometimes by the kings of Persia by a special officer, Nehemiah 2:8, and fortified by nature; yet not so strongly but that the Romans broke in this way, and much wasted the forest, employing the trees for the besieging of Jerusalem, as Isaiah 14:8. (Hence it is here called the forest of the vintage, or the defenced forest, Zechariah 11:2 marg.) The Chaldee paraphrast by Lebanon here understandeth the temple, which was built by the cedars of Lebanon; and Ezekiel 17:3, Lebanon is put for Jerusalem; which also had in it that house of the forest of Lebanon built by Solomon, 1 Kings 7:2, wherein he had both his throne of judgment, 1 Kings 7:7, and his armoury, 1 Kings 10:17. So that by Lebanon may be very well meant the whole country of Judea; but especially the city and temple, the iron gates whereof opened themselves of their own accord, that had not been open in seven years before, and could scarcely be shut by twenty men, saith Josephus (Lib. vii. de Bell. Jud. cap. 12). This happened not long before the city was taken by Titus, whereupon Rabbi Jonathan, the son of Zechariah, cried out, En vaticinium Zechariae, Behold the prophecy of Zechariah fulfilled; for he foretold this, that this temple should be burned, and that the gates thereof should first be opened.

That the fire may devour thy cedars] War is as a fire, that feedeth upon the people, Isaiah 9:19, or like as a hungry man snatcheth, &c., Isaiah 9:20, there is in war no measure or satiety of blood. The Greek word Pολεμος, for war, signifieth much blood. The Hebrew word, מלחמה devouring and eating of men, as they eat bread. The Latin Bellum, a belluis. destruction from wild beasts. It destroys the lord as well as the losel, the cedar as well as the shrub. Tamerlane’s coach horses were conquered kings. Adonibezek’s dogs, seventy kings gathering crumbs under his table. "Let fire come out of the bramble, and devour the cedars of Lebanon," 9:15, that is, let fire come out from Abimclech, and devour the men of Shechem, 9:20.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/zechariah-11.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Zechariah 11:1. Open thy doors, &c.— This manner of expression sufficiently shews, that Lebanon itself is not addressed, which had no doors, or gates; but the temple, built of the cedars of Lebanon. In the three preceding chapters, Zechariah spoke of the advantages and prosperities of Judah and Jerusalem, after the return from Babylon, both before and after the times of the Maccabees. Here he predicts the ruin of the temple, the rejection of the Jews, and their subjection to the Romans. He foretels at the same time a remarkable circumstance, in the passion of our Saviour, and marks out clearly the little flock of the church, and the care which the great Shepherd takes of it. See Calmet.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/zechariah-11.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

ZECHARIAH CHAPTER 11

The destruction of Jerusalem, Zechariah 11:1-3. Under the type of Zechariah is showed Christ’ s care for the flock, the Jews; and their rejection for ingratitude and light estimation of him, Zechariah 11:4-14. The type and curse of a foolish shepherd, Zechariah 11:15-17.

This chapter is minatory, and foretells the ruin of Jerusalem and the temple, this second temple, by the Romans, and the captivity of the Jews under them, for their rejecting of Christ; so the times of this chapter must be laid about the death of Christ and downwards.

Open thy doors, O Lebanon; either the temple, because built with cedars of Lebanon, so the temple is called, Ezekiel 17:3 Habakkuk 2:17; or Jerusalem, or Judea, whose boundary northward this mountain was: if all these do not fully suit with the text and context, perhaps this added may. Lebanon, a high and great mountain, boundary between Judea and its neighbours on the north, is here spoken to open its gates, its fortifications, raised to secure the passages, which through the hollownesses of the mountain, the deep and dismal straits, lead into Judea, and would be first attempted by the enemy that first invades the northern parts of Judea. These garrisons or fortresses are foretold like to be easily taken, as if they opened of themselves, and the Romans would have easy entrance by this means into Judea.

That the fire; either figuratively, the rage of the enemy, or the wrath of God; or literally, fire by the enemy kindled in the houses and buildings in Judea, and in Lebanon itself.

May devour thy cedars; palaces built with cedars, or else figuratively nobles, princes, and eminent men.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/zechariah-11.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The prophet announced in vigorous poetic language that Lebanon"s famous cedars would perish. The Israelites referred to the royal palace in Jerusalem as Lebanon because it contained so much cedar from Lebanon ( Jeremiah 22:23; cf. 1 Kings 7:2). The Talmud spoke of the second temple as Lebanon for the same reason. [Note: Baron, pp378-79.] The "second temple" refers to the temple that Ezra rebuilt and that Herod the Great refurbished, which stood until A.D70. The cedar tree also became a symbol of the royal house of Judah ( Ezekiel 17:3-4; Ezekiel 17:12-13).


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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/zechariah-11.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Zechariah 11:1. Open thy doors, O Lebanon — The prophet, having signified in the foregoing prophecy that the Jewish nation should recover its prosperity, flourish for some time, and become considerable; and having announced to Zion the coming of Messiah her king, and congratulated her on the peaceable nature and great extent of his kingdom, with the blessed effects which his rule should produce, proceeds now to foretel the ruin which should come on the body of the Jewish nation for rejecting him, with the destruction of their temple and capital city. To this only can the first three verses of this chapter relate; for no calamities happened to that people, from the time of Zechariah till that event, of which the expressions here used can with propriety be understood. Lebanon itself cannot be here addressed, which had no doors or gates: but it is figuratively put, either for the temple, built of the cedars of Lebanon, as it is Ezekiel 17:3; and Habakkuk 2:17; or for the city of Jerusalem, whose lofty buildings resembled the stately ranks of trees in a forest: but the former is more probably intended. And, if the Jewish writers may be credited, such was the application made of this prophecy by the Rabbi Johanan, when the doors of the temple opened of their own accord, a little before the temple was burned, a circumstance attested by Josephus, Bell. Jud. lib. 6. cap. 5: “Then R. Johanan, a disciple of R. Hillel, directing his speech to the temple, said, ‘I know thy destruction is at hand, according to the prophecy of Zechariah:’ Open thy doors, O Lebanon, &c.” That the fire — Either, figuratively, the wrath of God and the rage of the enemy, or, literally, fire kindled by the enemy; may devour thy cedars — Thy palaces and other fabrics built with cedars.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/zechariah-11.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Gates. Josephus (Jewish Wars vii. 12.) relates, that the heavy eastern gates flew open at midnight: and the priests officiating at Pentecost, heard a multitude crying, "Let us go hence." See Tacitus, History v. Johanan then declared, "O temple, I know thou wilt so be destroyed," as Zacharias foretold, Open, &c. (Kimchi; Lyranus; &c.) (Calmet) --- Libanus. So Jerusalem, and more particularly the temple, is called by the prophets, from its height, and from its being built of the cedars of Libanus. (Challoner) (Isaias x. 34., and Ezechiel xvii.) (St. Jerome) --- The destruction of both by Titus is predicted. (Worthington) --- Cedars. Thy princes and chief men. (Challoner) (Worthington)


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/zechariah-11.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Open, to. Figure of speech Apostrophe. App-6.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/zechariah-11.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Open thy doors, O Lebanon, that the fire may devour thy cedars.

Open thy doors, O Lebanon - i:e., the temple, so called, as being constructed of cedars of Lebanon, or as being lofty and conspicuous, like that mountain (cf. Ezekiel 17:3; Habakkuk 2:17). Forty years before the destruction of the temple, the tract called 'Massecheth Joma' states, its doors of their own accord opened, and Rabbi Johanan, in alarm, said, I know that thy desolation is impending, according to Zechariah's prophecy. Calvin supposes Lebanon to refer to Judea, described by its north boundary: "Lebanon," the route by which the Romans, according to Josephus, gradually advanced toward Jerusalem. Moore, from Hengstenberg, refers the passage to the civil war which caused the calling in of the Romans, who, like a storm sweeping through the land from Lebanon, deprived Judea of its independence. Thus the passage forms a fit introduction to the prediction as to Messiah, born when Judea became a Roman province. But the weight of authority is for the former view.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/zechariah-11.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Open thy doors, O Lebanon, that the fire may devour thy cedars.
O Lebanon
10:10; Jeremiah 22:6,7,23; Habakkuk 2:8,17; Haggai 1:8
that
14:1,2; Deuteronomy 32:22; Matthew 24:1,2; Luke 19:41-44; 21:23,24

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/zechariah-11.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Saturday, June 6th, 2020
the Week of Proper 4 / Ordinary 9
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