corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.20.06.06
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Zechariah 11:13

Then the LORD said to me, "Throw it to the potter, that magnificent price at which I was valued by them." So I took the thirty shekels of silver and threw them to the potter in the house of the LORD.

Adam Clarke Commentary

And the Lord said unto me, Cast it unto the potter - Jehovah calls the price of his prophet his own price; and commands that it should not be accepted, but given to a potter, to foreshadow the transaction related Matthew 27:7.

"Earthen vessels were used in the temple; and we may suppose that some Levites were employed within the sacred precincts to furnish them. To these, the humblest of his ministers in the temple, God commands that the degrading price should be cast." This is the substance of the notes on these two verses, given by Abp. Newcome.

We may look at it in another light, Give me my price! שכרי הבו habu sichri, bring my price, or give him any price; that is, Give the money to Judas which you have agreed to give him; for he can neither betray me nor you crucify me, but my own permission. But if not, forbear; take time to consider this bloody business, and in time forbear. For though I permit you to do it, yet remember that the permission does not necessitate you to do it; and the salvation of the world may be effected without this treachery and murder.

See my notes on this place, Matthew 27:9, where I have examined the evidence for the reading of "Zechariah the prophet," instead of "Jeremiah."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/zechariah-11.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And the Lord said unto me, Cast it - As a thing vile and rejected, as torn flesh was to be cast to dogs Exodus 22:31, or a corpse was cast unburied Isaiah 14:19; Isaiah 34:3; Jeremiah 14:16; Jeremiah 22:19; Jeremiah 26:23; Jeremiah 36:30, or the dead body of Absalom was cast into the pit 2 Samuel 18:17, or the dust of the idolaltars into the brook Kedron by Josiah 2 Kings 23:12, or the idols to the moles and the bats (Isaiah 2:20, add Ezekiel 20:8); or Judah and Israel from the face of God 2 Kings 13:23; 2 Kings 17:20; 24:21; Jeremiah 52:3 into a strange land (Deuteronomy 29:27, (28 English); Coniah and his seed, a vessel in which is no pleasure, Jeremiah 22:28, into a land which they knew not; or the rebels against God, said, “let us cast away their cards from us” Psalm 2:3; or wickedness was cast into the Ephah Zechariah 5:1-11:18; once it is added, “for loathing” Ezekiel 16:5.

Unto the potter - The words exactly correspond with the event, that the “thirty pieces of silver” were “cast” or flung away othat their ultimate destination was the potter, whose field was bought with them; but that they were not cast directly to him, (which were a contemptuous act, such as would not be used whether for a gift or a purchase), but were cast to him “in the house of the Lord.” They were “flung away” by the remorse of Judas, and, in God‘s Providence, came to the potter. Whether any portion of this was a direct symbolic action of the prophet, or whether it was a prophetic vision, in which Zechariah himself was an actor, and saw himself in the character which he described, doing what he relates, cannot now be said certainly, since God has not told us. It seems to me more probable, that these actions belonged to the vision, because in other symbolic actions of the prophets, no other actors take part; and it is to the last degree unlikely, that Zechariah, at whose preaching. Zerubbabel and Joshua and all the people set themselves earnestly to rebuild the temple, should have had so worthless a price offered to him; and the casting a price, which God condemned, into the house of God, at the command of God, and so implying His acceptance of it, were inconsistent. It was fulfilled, in act consistently, in Judas‘ remorse; in that he “flung away the pieces of silver,” which had stained his soul with innocent blood, “in the temple,” perhaps remembering the words of Zechariah; perhaps wishing to give to pious uses, too late, money which was the price of his soul; whereas God, even through the chief priests, rejected it, and so it came to the potter, its ultimate destination in the Providence of God. Osorius: “He saith, “cast it unto the potter,” that they might understand that they would be broken as a potter‘s vessel.”

A goodly price, that I was prized at of them - Literally, “the magnificence of the value, at which I was valued of them!” The strong irony is carried on by the, “at which I was valued of them,” as in the idiom, “thou wert precious in my sight” 1 Samuel 26:21; Psalm 72:14; 2 Kings 1:13-14; Isaiah 43:4. Precious the thought of God to David Psalm 139:17; precious the redemption of the soul of man Psalm 49:9; and precious was the Shepherd who came to them; precious was the value, whereat He was valued by them oAnd yet He, who was so valued, was Almighty God. For so it stands: “Thus saith the Lord God, Cast it unto the potter, the goodly price that I was prized at of them.” The name, “the potter,” connects the prophecy with that former prophecy of Jeremiah Jeremiah 19:1-15, denouncing the judgment of God for the shedding of innocent blood, whereby they had defiled “the valley of the son of Hinnom, which was at the entry of the gate of the pottery, oand which, through the vengeance of God there, should be called “the valley of slaughter” Jeremiah 19:6.

The price of this innocent Blood, by the shedding of which the iniquities of their fathers were filled up, should rest on that same place, for whose sake God said, “I will break this people and this city, as one breaketh a potter‘s vessel, that cannot be made whole again” Jeremiah 19:11. So then Matthew may have quoted this prophecy as Jeremiah‘s, to signify how the woes, denounced on the sins committed in this same place, should be brought upon it through this last crowning sin, and “all the righteous blood which had been shed, should come upon that generation” o

None of the other cases of mixed quotation come up to this. Mark quotes two prophecies, of Malachi and of Isaiah as Isaiah‘s Mark 1:2-3. Matthew blends in one, words of Isaiah Isaiah 62:1 and Zechariah Zechariah 9:9 as “the prophet” Matthew 21:4-5. Our Lord unites Isaiah 56:7, and Jeremiah 7:11, with the words,” It is written.”

Of earlier fathers “Tertullian” simply quotes the prophecy as Jeremiah‘s (adv. Marc. iv. 40). “Origen” says, “Jeremiah is not said to have prophesied this anywhere in his books, either what are read in the Churches, or reported (referuntur) among the Jews. I suspect that it is an error of writing, or that it is some secret writing of Jeremiah wherein it is written.” (in Matt. p. 916.) “Euscbius” says, “Consider since this, is not in the prophet Jeremiah, whether we must think that it was removed from it by some wickedness, or whether it was a clericai error of those who made the copies of the Gospels carelessly.” Dem. Ev. x. p. 481).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/zechariah-11.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"And Jehovah said unto me, Cast it unto the potter, the goodly price that I was prized at by them. And I took the thirty pieces of silver and cast them unto the potter, in the house of Jehovah."

Here again the prevalent misunderstanding of the critics finds a stumbling block in the fact that here Jehovah cast the money unto the potter, whereas, in the New Testament it was Judas who did it. See under Zechariah 11:12, above. It was indeed God who cast that money to the potter; and the same thing is true of a number of other actions accredited in the New Testament to many of the persons engaged in the dark drama of Calvary. It was God who spoke a prophecy through the evil high priest (John 12:51,52); it was God who wrote: THIS IS JESUS OF NAZARETH THE KING OF THE JEWS as the inscription upon the cross; it was God who ordered the centurion who commanded the detail at Calvary to disobey the command of Pilate to break Jesus' legs; and it was God who flung the blood money at the feet of the High Priest, a signal of the infamous crimes of that priestly conclave coming home to roost; and it was God who ordered it paid to the potter for the purchase of a field, Aceldema, the Field of Blood. Well indeed might the prophet have said, "I took the thirty pieces of silver and cast them unto the potter, in the house of the Lord," thus ascribing the action to God.

How futile are the screams of the critics who cannot identify this potter! There might not have been any. Zechariah was speaking, through the power of the Holy Ghost, of an incident that would not occur until centuries had rolled by. If one wishes to find the potter let him turn to Matthew 27:7 and to Acts 1:17-19.

Having already eliminated the glorious fulfillment of this passage from any consideration, it occurs to the critic that the text here should read differently: "It is pretty generally agreed that the text needs emendation! The command addressed to the Shepherd should read, `put it in the treasury'![33] How ridiculous! It was against the law of God to put blood money in the treasury (Matthew 27:6); and for men to emend the text to make God command the violation of his own law is going too far. Most commentators try to make out that "cast it unto the potter" is some kind of proverbial expression, such as "throw it to the dogs," "to the bats and moles," etc.; but we do not believe any such proverb ever existed, nor have we ever heard or seen it used. Men will not find "the potter" in this passage but in the disposition of the money that Judas hurled at the feet of the priest. How can a Christian commentator say, "No satisfactory explanation of the reference to the potter has been advanced?"[34] Have such exegetes never heard of predictive prophecy? Well, that is positively what we have in this passage. If it is objected that the money in this passage was not actually "blood money," such has no bearing on the matter; because in the event being typically presented here, it was "blood money."

The thing that puzzles some students of this passage is that there was no "potter" who can be identified as associated in any manner with the Jewish temple. How then could Zechariah have recognized the potter and have thrown the money to him? Although no man has the answer to that question, we do have Zechariah's inspired statement that he did it! Therefore, he either already knew what God meant, or God revealed it to him at the moment of his obedience. "How" this was done is of of no concern whatever. The prophecy consisted of the fact that it was done exactly as God commanded, a truth affirmed by a separate declaration, "And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of Jehovah."

Matthew's referral of this passage to the prophecy of Jeremiah is a puzzle. We are sure that the reason for it would be clear if we had all of the facts. "Believers in the inspiration of the Scriptures reject the theory that ... it was due to a lapse of memory on Matthew's part."[35] One of the giants of Biblical exegesis, Bishop J. B. Lightfoot, one of the most learned men of half a millennium, called attention to the fact that:

"Different groups of Old Testament writings were named among the Jews according to the first book of the roll. Zechariah happened to be in the book, or roll, in which Jeremiah was the first book."[36]

It remains one of the mysteries of the New Testament which we cannot explain; but some other things are clear enough. It was not Matthew who misunderstood this passage in Zechariah, it is the present-day critics who write their books without any reference to the Christ, who do not see any suggestion at all of him in this glorious chapter, and who have invented all kinds of tales that they try to fit into the picture that appears in such brilliance here. For example, Dummelow proposed the following as a fulfillment of Zechariah's prophecy:

"The Good Shepherd of this chapter, according to a recent review, was Hyrcanus, the son of Joseph who may have been paid to leave Jerusalem but at a price so small that he threw it into the treasury in disgust!"[37]

To which it should be stated that such a piddling and insignificant incident as that simply cannot be dignified with enough importance to justify a prophet of God foretelling the event centuries ahead of time. With some, it is a question of taking "any explanation except the true one."

A SUMMARY OF THIS PROPHECY

This prophecy of the betrayal of Jesus Christ by Judas Iscariot for thirty pieces of silver is one of the most remarkable in the Bible. It is not a single prophecy, merely, but a whole constellation of prophecies. Note:

1. The Good Shepherd himself shall be bought and sold. This is a unique reference to Christ and cannot be applied to any other.

2. The Shepherd himself makes the "deal," which Jesus did in the person of his servant, Judas.

3. The amount of money was the price of a slave "gored to death" by an ox, indicating that those who paid it considered the Lord to be already dead (as was the case, in their purpose).

4. The amount of money would be "weighed out," a fact Matthew took pains to relate (Matthew 17:15).

5. The money would be cast unto the potter in the house of the Lord. This occurred when Judas, remorse stricken, flung the money at the feet of the High Priest in the temple.

6. That it would also be to the "potter" was fulfilled when the evil shepherds, reluctant to put blood money in the treasury, bought a field from a potter (See Acts 1:17-19).

7. Observe what was here revealed about that 30 pieces of silver:

The amount would be weighed (to Judas).

He would throw it into the house of the Lord.

Those hypocrites were unwilling to put it in the treasury.

So they put it into the purchase of the potter's field.

There is not another example of tracing the exact money through four separate transactions in the entire history of the ancient Roman empire!

8. Note, also, that the evil shepherds (Pharisees, Sadducees, and Herodians, the Sanhedrin) by revealing their purpose of slaying Christ in the very purchase-price accepted, also sealed their own fate; for the ancient law legislated that a "slave gored by an ox" could be redeemed for 30 pieces of silver, all right; but that THE OX WOULD HAVE TO BE STONED!SIZE>

In addition to all of the above, which any one can easily see and understand, we have the additional testimony of the sacred historians Matthew and Luke who affirm the truth of all of this, and who unhesitatingly applied the fulfillment of Zechariah's prophecy exactly as we have here. We hold their testimony to be incontrovertible, true, inviolate, inspired and certain. It is a big order which the critics have accepted in their efforts to get Christ out of Zechariah 11.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/zechariah-11.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the Lord said unto me,.... The Prophet Zechariah, in a visionary way representing the sanhedrim of the Jews, the chief priests, scribes, and elders:

Cast it unto the potter; for the purchase of his field, in order to make a burying ground of it for strangers:

a goodly price that I was prised at of them; this is sarcastically said; meaning that it was a very poor price; and showed that they had no notion of the worth and value of Christ, the Pearl of great price:

and I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the Lord; it is a question with some what these pieces of silver were; they are commonly understood of silver shekels. So the Targum, in Genesis 20:16 renders pieces of silver by shekels of silver; and EusebiusF13Demonstr. Evangel. l. 10. p. 479. calls these here thirty staters, the same with shekels; which, if common shekels, reckoned at one shilling and three pence, made but thirty seven shillings and sixpence; and if shekels of the sanctuary, which at most were but two shillings and sixpence, thirty of these would make but three pounds fifteen shillings; and therefore may be truly called, ironically speaking, "a goodly price"; being no more than the price of a servant, as before observed: but Drusius objects to this, seeing a potter's field was bought with this money; and asks, who can believe that a field near so populous a city as Jerusalem could be bought for thirty shekels? and observes, from R. Elias LevitaF14In Tishbi, p. 130. , that it is a rule with their doctors, that all silver mentioned in the law signifies shekels; in the prophets, pounds; and in the Hagiographa, talents: this is said, but not proved: to understand these of pounds, indeed, would make the price considerable, and sufficient for the purchase of a large field; for a silver maneh or pound with the Jews was of the value of sixty shekels, Ezekiel 45:12 and thirty of these make two hundred and seventy pounds; but then this would not in an ironical way be called "a goodly price": and as to the objection about the purchase of a field with such a sum of money as thirty shekels amount to, it may be observed, what Grotius seems rightly to conjecture, that this was a field the potter had dug up, and had made the most of it, and so was good for nothing but for such an use, for which it was bought, to bury strangers in. It is also a difficulty to fix it certainly to whom this money was ordered to be given, and was given. It is here said "to the potter"; but Jarchi and Kimchi observe, that some of their interpreters render it the "treasurer"; א and י being sometimes changed for one another; thus, the Targum paraphrases it,

"under the hand of the treasurer;'

and so othersF15"Ad thesaurarium", Pagninus, Vatablus. ; and indeed the money was given to the chief priests and elders, some of whom might be in that office, Matthew 27:3 though there is no need of such an alteration of the word, since the money Judas took for betraying Christ, and cast into the temple to the priests, they took up, and gave it to the potter for the field they bought of him with it; and, in the evangelist, the phrase by way of explanation is rendered, "for the potter's field", and may be here properly enough translated, "for the potter"; as the particle אל is sometimes usedF16Vid. Nold. Ebr. Part. Concord. p. 63. ; that is, to be given to him for purchase moneyF17אל היוצר "pro figulo", Cocceius; "conferendos in figulum", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator; "ut detur ad figulum", Burkius. : and whereas the money is said to be cast, or given to him, "in the house of the Lord", i.e. in the temple, it appears a fact, in the accomplishment of this prophecy, that it was cast into the temple, Matthew 27:5 and was took up by the priests; who, in all probability, sent for the potter thither, and agreed with him for his field, and paid him his money there; for there is no reason to believe that he had a workhouse for his business in the temple; though it may be he had one near it; see Jeremiah 18:1 and worked for the service of it, since earthen vessels were used in temple serviceF18Vid. Misn. Parah, c. 5. sect. 1. . The accomplishment of all this is in Matthew 27:7.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/zechariah-11.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And the LORD said to me, Cast it to the q potter: a glorious price that I was valued at by them. And I took the thirty [pieces] of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the LORD.

(q) Showing that it was too little to pay his wages with, which could hardly suffice to make a few tiles to cover the temple.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/zechariah-11.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Cast it unto the potter — proverbial: Throw it to the temple potter, the most suitable person to whom to cast the despicable sum, plying his trade as he did in the polluted valley (2 Kings 23:10) of Hinnom, because it furnished him with the most suitable clay. This same valley, and the potter‘s shop, were made the scene of symbolic actions by Jeremiah (Jeremiah 18:1-19:15) when prophesying of this very period of Jewish history. Zechariah connects his prophecy here with the older one of Jeremiah: showing the further application of the same divine threat against his unfaithful people in their destruction under Rome, as before in that under Nebuchadnezzar. Hence Matthew 27:9, in English Version, and in the oldest authorities, quotes Zechariah‘s words as Jeremiah‘s, the latter being the original author from whom Zechariah derived the groundwork of the prophecy. Compare the parallel case of Mark 1:2, Mark 1:3 in the oldest manuscripts (though not in English Version), quoting Malachi‘s words as those of “Isaiah,” the original source of the prophecy. Compare my Introduction to Zechariah. The “potter” is significant of God‘s absolute power over the clay framed by His own hands (Isaiah 45:9; Jeremiah 18:6; Romans 9:20, Romans 9:21).

in the house of the Lord — The thirty pieces are thrown down in the temple, as the house of Jehovah, the fit place for the money of Jehovah-Messiah being deposited, in the treasury, and the very place accordingly where Judas “cast them down.” The thirty pieces were cast “to the potter,” because it was to him they were “appointed by the Lord” ultimately to go, as a worthless price (compare Matthew 27:6, Matthew 27:7, Matthew 27:10). For “I took,” “I threw,” here Matthew has “they took,” “they gave them”; because their (the Jews‘ and Judas‘) act was all Hisappointment” (which Matthew also expresses), and therefore is here attributed to Him (compare Acts 2:23; Acts 4:28). It is curious that some old translators translate, for “to the potter,” “to the treasury” (so Maurer), agreeing with Matthew 27:6. But English Version agrees better with Hebrew and Matthew 27:10.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/zechariah-11.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And the LORD said unto me, Cast it unto the potter: a goodly price that I was prised at of them. And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the LORD.

The Lord — God the Father.

Cast it — As being so little, it would hardly purchase any thing but what was the cheapest among them.

A goodly price — God upbraids the shepherds of his people, who prized the great Shepherd no higher.

Cast them to the potter — Or rather, cast them into the house of the Lord for the potter; all which the Jewish rulers acted over.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/zechariah-11.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Hence he adds, Jehovah said to me, throw it to the potter. “This truly is my reward! Cast it to the potter, that he may get some bricks or coverings to repair the temple; if there are any parts of the temple dilapidated, let the potter get thereby some bricks, or let any humble artisan have such a price for himself.” But he afterwards speaks ironically when he says, the magnificence and the glory of the price at which he had been estimated! “This is, forsooth! the magnificence of my price, though I had endured many toils! they now deal with me as with some mean swineherd, though I was their Lord and Shepherd: since then they seek thus craftily to satisfy me, and reproachfully offer me a paltry reward, and as it were degrade my glory and spit in my face, Cast, cast it, he says, to the potter; ” that is, let them repair the temple, in which they delight so much as if they were in heaven: for the temple is their idol; but God will be never nigh them while they act thus hypocritically with him. “Let them then repair the breaches of the temple and pay the price to the potter, for I will not suffer a price so unworthy of my majesty to be obtruded so disgracefully on me.”

We now then apprehend the meaning of the Prophet: and first we must bear in mind what I have stated, that here is described how irreclaimable had been the wickedness of the people: though rejected by God, when he had broken his rod, they yet esteemed as nothing the favors which they had experienced. How so? because they thought that they performed an abundant service to God, when they worshipped him by external frivolities; for ceremonies without a real sense of religion are frivolous puerilities in God’s presence. What then the Prophet now urges is, that the Jews wilfully buried God’s benefits, by which he had nevertheless so bound them to himself that they could not be released. And to the same purpose is what follows, Cast it to the potter: for he testifies that the price was of no value, nay, that he abominated such a reward as men paid hint when they dealt with him in such a reproachful manner; for as he says in Isaiah, it was a weariness to him —

“I am disgusted with your festal days; why do you daily tread the pavement of my temple?” (Isaiah 1:12;)

and again he says,

“He who slays an ox is the same as he who kills a man.”
(
Isaiah 66:3.)

God in these places shows, as here by Zechariah, that these sacrifices which ungodly men and hypocrites offer to him, without a right feeling of religion, are the greatest abominations to him, — why? Because it is the highest indignity which the wicked call offer, which is as it were to spit in his face, when they compare him to a potter or a swineherd, and think nothing of the reward which he deserves, and that is, to consecrate and really to devote themselves wholly to him without any dissimulation. When therefore men trifle with God and think that he is delighted with frivolous puerilities, they compare him, as I have said, to a swineherd, or to some low or common workman; and this is an indignity which he cannot bear, and for which he manifests hero by his Prophet his high displeasure. (145)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/zechariah-11.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Zechariah 11:13 And the LORD said unto me, Cast it unto the potter: a goodly price that I was prised at of them. And I took the thirty [pieces] of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the LORD.

Ver. 13. Cast it unto the potter] q.d. Do they deal with me as with some sordid swineherd? Do they award me less than carters’ wages? Throw it away, let the potter take it; and let us see how many tiles he can afford us for it, to repair the roof of the temple. Their undervaluing and despising of me in this sort is not only injurious, but contumelious; it is to turn my glory into shame; to spit in my face; or to use me as homely as Rachel did her father’s gods, which she laid among the litter, and sat upon.

A goodly price that I was valued at of them] So he calleth it by an irony, or a holy jeer. Poor Joseph was sold for less; for twenty pieces of silver, Genesis 37:28 "They sold the just one for silver, and the poor for a pair of shoes," Amos 2:6. The Hebrews tell us, that of those twenty shekels every one of the ten brethren had two to buy shoes for his feet. The Jews that bought Christ for thirty pieces of silver (this goodly price) of the traitor that sold him, were themselves afterwards (by a just hand of God upon them) bought and sold thirty of them for a penny by the Romans, ad illudendum, saith mine author, for a scorn to their nation. God loves to retaliate, and to set the scales even; men’s cruelty in the one, and their reward in the other. If we be at any time underrated by the world (as we are sure to be; for the world knows us not, 1 John 3:2), what so great matter is it, since Christ himself was no more set by? We must be content to pass to heaven (as he did) as concealed men. It must suffice us that our precious faith shall be found to praise, honour, and glory, at that great fair day, 1 Peter 1:7, when all fardles {litle bundles} shall be opened, and our best wares exposed to public view.

And cast them to the potter] "I gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me," saith the evangelist, Matthew 27:10, expounding the prophet, and applying the words to Christ, who is hereby also proved to be God. So true is that observation of divines, that the Old Testament is both explained and fulfilled in the New, by a happy harmony.

In the house of the Lord] That thereby he might the more sharply prick the priests; whose care it ought to have been that God should be better prized by the people, and his service better observed.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/zechariah-11.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The Lord, God the Father, with detestation of so vile an affront and undervalue of his Son, said unto me; to Zechariah, in this theatre personating Christ sometimes.

Cast it unto the potter; as being so little it would hardly purchase any thing but what was cheapest among them, a little earthenware.

A goodly price that I was prized at of them: in an irony God upbraids the shepherds of his people, who prized the great Shepherd no higher.

I took; Zechariah, who in this part now emblematically doth what Judas will with horror do when he hath sold innocent blood and betrayed it.

Cast them to the potter in the house of the Lord; or rather, east them into the house of the Lord for the potter, all which the Jewish rulers act over in their prosecuting Christ unto death.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/zechariah-11.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The Lord instructed Zechariah to throw the30 shekels of silver to the potter since it was, ironically, such a handsome price. His service had been worth far more than that. So Zechariah threw the30 shekels of silver to the potter in the temple. Evidently the setting of Zechariah"s visionary allegory was the temple courtyard. Throwing something to the potter was evidently a proverbial way of expressing disdain for it since potters were typically poor and lowly craftsmen. [Note: Unger, p200; Leupold, p217.]

"The fulfillment of this prophecy in Matthew 27:3-10 is proof enough that the money was flung down in the temple and immediately taken up by the priests to purchase a field of a potter for a burying ground for the poor." [Note: Unger, p200. ]

Matthew attributed this prophecy to Jeremiah ( Matthew 27:9-10). Probably Matthew was referring to Jeremiah 32:6-9, which he condensed using mainly the phraseology of Zechariah 11:12-13 because of its similarity to Judas" situation. Joining (conflating) two quotations from two Old Testament books and assigning them to one prophet follows the custom of mentioning only the more notable prophet. Compare Mark 1:2-3, in which Isaiah 40:3 and Malachi 3:1 are quoted but are assigned to Isaiah. [Note: For further discussion, see Hobart E. Freeman, An Introduction to the Old Testament Prophets, pp340-42.]

"Like the earlier prophecy of the King (ix9), the prophecy of the Shepherd is remarkable for its literal fulfillment. The "thirty pieces of silver" were literally the "goodly price" paid for Him, "whom they of the children of Israel did value." "The potter" was literally the recipient of it, as the purchase money of his exhausted field for an unclean purpose (Matt. xxvii5-10)." [Note: Perowne, p127.]


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/zechariah-11.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

The statuary. The Hebrew word signifies also a potter, (Challoner) and this seems to be the true meaning, Matthew xxvii. 3. The prophet is ordered to bring, thus to indicate what should be done by the traitor. (Calmet) --- Septuagint, "cast them into the crucible to see if it (the metal) be good, as I have been tried by them." (Haydock)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/zechariah-11.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Cast it. As in Genesis 21:15. 2 Chronicles 24:10. unto the potter. The Syriac reads "into the treasury".

potter = fashioner. The material cast to, so as to be used by, the fashioner determines the meaning of the word (Hebrew. yazar). If clay, then a potter (Jeremiah 18:4; Jeremiah 19:1). If stone, then a jeweller, or mason (Ex. Zechariah 28:11, 2 Samuel 5:11; 1 Chronicles 22:15). If wood, then a carpenter (1 Samuel 5:11. 2 Kings 12:11. 1 Chronicles 14:1. Isaiah 44:13). If iron, then a smith (2 Chronicles 24:12. Isaiah 44:12). If gold, then a goldsmith (Hosea 8:6). If silver, then a silversmith (Hosea 13:2). The casting of silver to a potter was as incongruous as casting clay to a silversmith. See App-161.

goodly = ample. Used of a wide garment. There is no evidence of irony here or elsewhere in Zechariah. The Hebrew "eder denotes size and amplitude, as in Jonah 3:6 and Micah 2:8.

prised = priced.

of them: i.e. by them. But some codices read "by you


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/zechariah-11.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the LORD said unto me, Cast it unto the potter: a goodly price that I was prised at of them. And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the LORD.

And the Lord said unto me, Cast it unto the potter - proverbial: throw it to the temple-potter, the most suitable person to whom to cast the despicable sum, plying his trade as he did in the polluted valley (2 Kings 23:10) of Hinnom, because it furnished him with the most suitable clay. This same valley, and the potter's shop, were made the scene of symbolic action by Jeremiah (Zechariah 1:8; Zechariah 1:19), when prophesying of this very period of Jewish history. Zechariah connects his prophecy here with the older one of Jeremiah; showing the further application of the same divine threat against His unfaithful people in their destruction under Rome, as before in that under Nebuchadnezzar. Hence, Matthew 27:9 in the English version, and in the oldest authorities, quotes Zechariah's words as Jeremiah's the latter being the original author from whom Zechariah derived the groundwork of the prophecy. Compare the parallel case of Mark 1:2-3, in the oldest manuscripts (though not in the English version), quoting Malachi's words (Malachi 3:1) as those of "Isaiah," who was in fact (Isaiah 40:3) the original source of the prophecy; "As it is written in the prophet Esaias, Behold I send my messenger before thy face, who shall prepare thy way before thee." Isaiah first had said, "Prepare ye the way of the Lord," and Malachi had expanded this prophetic germ. Compare my Introduction to "Zechariah." The "potter" is significant of God's absolute power over the clay framed by His own hand (Isaiah 45:9 ; Jeremiah 18:6; Romans 9:20-21,

A goodly price that I was prized at of them - irony. Whereas I looked for their love and obedience as the return for my love, they offered me ceremonial observances without piety, and ended with selling me at thirty pieces of silver.

And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the Lord. The 30 pieces are thrown down in the temple, as the house of Yahweh, the fit place for the money of Yahweh-Messiah being deposited in the treasury, and the very place, accordingly, where Judas "cast them down." The 30 pieces were cast "to the potter," because it was to him they were "appointed by the Lord" ultimately to go, as a worthless price (cf. Matthew 27:6-7; Matthew 27:10). For "I took," and "I cast them:" here Matthew has "they took," "they gave them;" because their (the Jews' and Judas') act was all His "appointment," in accordance with His "determinate counsel and foreknowledge" (which Matthew also expresses), and therefore is here attributed to Him (cf. Acts 2:23; Acts 4:28). It is curious, some old translators, the Chaldaic and Syriac versions, and Kimchi, translate [ hayowtseer (Hebrew #3335)], for "to the potter," 'to the treasury' (so Maurer), agreeing with Matthew 27:6, "The chief priests took the silver pieces, and said, It is not lawful for to put them into the treasury." But the English version agrees better with the Hebrew and Matthew 27:10, "and gave them for the potter's field, as the Lord appointed me."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/zechariah-11.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) This verse proves, if proof be needed, that the prophet, in his action, represents the Lord.

Potter.—The price was so contemptible that it is flung to the meanest of craftsmen. It seems probable that “to the potter with it!” was a proverbial expression, used of throwing away anything that was utterly worthless. The LXX., by the change of one letter, read for “potter,” the “treasury.”

A goodly price . . . of them.—Better, O, the magnificence of the price that I was apprised at of them! That is to say, “What a price!” ironically. The prophet—in imagination, no doubt—goes into the Temple, and there before God and Israel, in the place where the covenant had been so often ratified by sacrifice, he meets “a potter” (the article is indefinite), and there flings to him the “goodly price,” and so pronounces the divorce between God and the congregation of Israel. The prophet, in his symbolical act, represented God (Ezekiel 34:5), but at the same time he might well (or must) have represented God’s vice-gerent, “my servant David,” or, in other words, the Messiah. (See Notes on Zechariah 3:8; Zechariah 6:12-13.) Thus, though this prophecy received, no doubt, numerous fulfilments in the oft-recurring ingratitude of Israel, yet we can well, with St. Matthew, see its most remarkable and complete fulfilment in Him who was in every sense “the Good Shepherd,” and in whose rejection the ingratitude of the chosen nation culminated. The citation in the New Testament is a free paraphrase of the original, made, probably, from memory, and agrees in all the main points with the original. The introduction of the word “field” (Matthew 27:10) was made, probably inadvertently, by an unconscious act of a mind which wished to find an excellent parallel between the prophecy and its fulfilment; but the price, thirty pieces of silver, does not seem to have been a mere coincidence. May not the “chief priests” have viciously proposed to Judas this price of a slave (the same that Hosea paid for the adulterous woman, half in money, and half in kind, Zechariah 2:1-2)? and may not the wretched Judas have maliciously accepted this very sum from the same motives which the prophet supposes to have actuated the people to whom he prophesies? Such a fulfilment would be a fulfilment indeed; while a mere chance coincidence between the sum mentioned in one case and that mentioned in another, apart from any agreement in the latter with the spirit of the former, would, in our estimation, amount to no fulfilment at all.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/zechariah-11.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the LORD said unto me, Cast it unto the potter: a goodly price that I was prised at of them. And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the LORD.
Cast
Isaiah 54:7-10; Matthew 27:3-10,12; Acts 1:18,19
a goodly
Isaiah 53:2,3; Acts 4:11

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Zechariah 11:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/zechariah-11.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Saturday, June 6th, 2020
the Week of Proper 4 / Ordinary 9
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology