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Bible Encyclopedias

The 1901 Jewish Encyclopedia

Aaron ben-Zion Ibn Alamani

Dayyan, or judge, and prominent Jew of Alexandria in the twelfth century. His family name probably means al-Umani, or "the man of Oman" (Judah ha-Levi, "Diwan," ed. Harkavy, p. 180; Steinschneider, "Jew. Quart. Rev." 11:486). His father, whose name was Joshua, was, it seems, a physician of some repute. It was at Aaron's house that Judah ha-Levi lived while in Alexandria; and the poet is extravagant in the praise of his friend, who, to judge from the titles given him, must have been a man of importance. Two of Ha-Levi's poems are addressed to Aaron: one of them he sent with a letter in rimed prose, which letter is included in the "Diwan." Ha-Levi also mentions Aaron in a letter which he sent from Damietta to Samuel Nagid.

Bibliography:
  • Gr├Ątz, Gesch. d. Juden, 2d ed., 6:150;
  • Kaempf, Nichtandalusische Poesie Andalusischer Dichter, 1:284;
  • Luzzatto, Betulat bat Yehudah, p. 111;
  • Judah ha-Levi, Diwan, ed. Brody, pp. 207-210, 212; idem, ed. Harkavy, pp. 37, 146, 161.
G.

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Bibliography Information
Singer, Isidore, Ph.D, Projector and Managing Editor. Entry for 'Aaron ben-Zion Ibn Alamani'. 1901 The Jewish Encyclopedia. https://www.studylight.org/encyclopedias/eng/tje/a/aaron-ben-zion-ibn-alamani.html. 1901.

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