Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Wednesday, March 28

1568
Father Geronimo Ruiz Portillo, with six companions, arrives at Callao, Peru, the country's first Jesuit missionaries. They will propagate the Christian faith among Indian populations, open churches, build schools, and develop a missionary training center.
1606
Trial of Father Garnet, a leading English Jesuit, for collusion in the Gunpowder Plot to blow up parliament. Found guilty, he will be hanged in May.
1661
Scottish Parliament passed the Rescissory Act, which repealed the whole of the legislation enacted since 1633. Its effect was to overthrow Presbyterianism and to restore the Anglican episcopacy to Scotland.
1871
John Joseph Ignatius von D
1886
Death of theologian Richard Chenevix Trench, archbishop of Dublin and student of Bible words, noted for his work New Testament Synonyms.
1896
Death of author, painter, linguist, and hymnwriter Elizabeth Rundle Charles in London, England. One of her better-known hymns was "Never Farther than Thy Cross."
1936
Birth of Bill Gaither, contemporary Gospel songwriter and vocal artist. Together with his wife Gloria, he wrote some of the most popular Christian songs of the 1960s-1970s, including "Because He Lives," "The King is Coming," "The Longer I Serve Him" and "Something Beautiful."
1938
Death at Oslo fylke, Norway, of Robert Parmalee Wilder, who had been an organizer of the Princeton Foreign Missionary Society and other mission societies. He had also been influential in the formation of the Student Volunteer Movement that advocated the “evangelization of the world in this generation,” and he authored several books on missions.
1961
English apologist C. S. Lewis wrote in "Letters to American Lady": 'The main purpose of our life is to reach the point at which one's own life as a person is at an end. One must in this sense "die," relinquish one's freedom and independence... "He that loses his life shall find it."'
2011
The Simon Wiesenthal Center posthumously awards Hiram Bingham IV their medal of valor. Bingham, an Episcopalian, had been an American diplomat in France during the early years of the Nazi occupation and violated State Department protocol by arranging escapes for persecuted Jews. He will be remembered with other Righteous Gentiles in the Episcopal Church calendar on July 19.

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© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"