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Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Saturday, March 28

519
Under Emperor Justinian, the churches of the East and West reconcile. They had been separated for thirty-five years during the Acacian Schism, which revolved around whether or not Christ had two natures - the human and the divine. This had been the first significant break between the churches of East and West.
1521
Pope Leo X condemns Luther by name on Maundy Thursday in the bull In Coena Domini, along with all his adherents.
1538
A number of Geneva's Catholic citizens, under the lead of Fran
1568
Father Geronimo Ruiz Portillo, with six companions, arrives at Callao, Peru, the country's first Jesuit missionaries. They will propagate the Christian faith among Indian populations, open churches, build schools, and develop a missionary training center.
1871
John Joseph Ignatius von D
1929
Death in England of evangelist and devotional writer Frederick Brotherton Meyer, an English Baptist clergyman.
1936
Birth of Bill Gaither, contemporary Gospel songwriter and vocal artist. Together with his wife Gloria, he wrote some of the most popular Christian songs of the 1960s-1970s, including "Because He Lives," "The King is Coming," "The Longer I Serve Him" and "Something Beautiful."
1938
Death at Oslo fylke, Norway, of Robert Parmalee Wilder, who had been an organizer of the Princeton Foreign Missionary Society and other mission societies. He had also been influential in the formation of the Student Volunteer Movement that advocated the "evangelization of the world in this generation," and he authored several books on missions.
1961
English apologist C. S. Lewis wrote in "Letters to American Lady": 'The main purpose of our life is to reach the point at which one's own life as a person is at an end. One must in this sense "die," relinquish one's freedom and independence... "He that loses his life shall find it."'
2011
The Simon Wiesenthal Center posthumously awards Hiram Bingham IV their medal of valor. Bingham, an Episcopalian, had been an American diplomat in France during the early years of the Nazi occupation and violated State Department protocol by arranging escapes for persecuted Jews. He will be remembered with other Righteous Gentiles in the Episcopal Church calendar on July 19.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"