Attention!
Tired of seeing ads while studying? Now you can enjoy an "Ads Free" version of the site for as little as 10¢ a day.

Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Saturday, May 5

1572
Election of Jeremias II as patriarch of Constantinople. The Turks will remove him from office twice and imprison him once. More than most patriarchs, he will interact with the West. He will also make the Russian Orthodox Church self-governing.
1624
Antonio Homem, a Christian theologian from Coimbra University, is burned at the stake in an auto da f
1766
Death of Jean Astruc, a pioneer in the study of venereal diseases and of biblical criticism. In an effort to defend the books of Moses, he noted the different contexts of Elohim and Yahweh (Hebrew names for God) and proposed the documentary hypothesis, that Genesis was based on several ancient sources.
1815
Birth of New England musical artist Ithamar Conkey. In addition to being a well-known church organist and bass soloist, Conkey also penned the hymn tune RATHBUN, to which we sing today, "In the Cross of Christ I Glory."
1899
The Religious Tract Society, founded in 1799, celebrated its 100th anniversary in Exeter Hall, London. The Society had by then published and distributed Christian literature in over 270 languages and dialects.
1910
Death in Edinburgh, Scotland, of Alexander McLaren, a non-conformist preacher who had preached from the original languages of the Bible and witnessed deep transformations in the churches he pastored. He had thought his sermons fell short, but posterity will regard them as among the clearest ever published.
1950
American missionary and martyr Jim Elliot wrote in his journal: 'The conflict of science and religion is fought between the errors of both camps.'
1988
Eugene Antonio Marino, 53, was installed as the archbishop of Atlanta, becoming the first black Roman Catholic archbishop in the U.S.
1992
William Carson begins tent meetings in Los Angeles that lead to the formation of the Apostolic Faith Home Assembly in August 1923.
1998
Orthodox Russians in Yekaterinburg (Russia's fourth largest city and located in the Ural Federal District) burn a number of books by "liberals" such as Alexander Men (sometimes called the C. S. Lewis of the Soviet Union), Nicolas Afanasiev, Alexander Schmemann, and John Meyendorff, deeming them heretical.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"