Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Wednesday, August 13

662
Death of St. Maximus the Confessor, who had been a vigorous opponent of Monothelitism. Dreadfully persecuted, he had been humiliated, had his tongue cut out and his right hand chopped off. Monothelitism was the heresy that Christ had a divine, but no human, will.
1682
The first Welsh immigrants to the American colonies arrived in Pennsylvania. They were Quakers, and settled near modern Philadelphia.
1727
In the German village of Herrnhut, religious reformer Count Nicolaus von Zinzendorf, 27, organized a group of Bohemian Protestant refugees into the first Moravian community of "Unitas Fratrum" (united brotherhood).
1768
John Witherspoon assumes the presidency of Nassau Hall (i.e. the original Princeton).
1783
Death of Tikhon of Zadonsk, a bishop of the Russian Orthodox Church, notable for his spiritual writings that stressed love and forgiveness. "Do we forgive our neighbors their trespasses? God also forgives us in His mercy. Do we refuse to forgive? God, too, will refuse to forgive us. As we treat our neighbors, so also does God treat us."
1834
Martin John Spalding is ordained in Rome. He will become bishop of Louisville, Kentucky, where he will work tirelessly to expand the Roman Catholic Church, and will found the American College at Louvain.
1843
Ganga Narayan Sil, a learned convert from Hinduism, preaches his final sermon. Although never formally ordained, he had preached in streets and in chapels, winning Hindus and Muslims to Christ.
1908
Death of Ira D. Sankey. He had been Dwight L. Moody's song evangelist for three decades, and had penned many hymn tunes, including the tunes to which "Faith is the Victory" and "Simply Trusting Every Day" are sung.
1919
Birth of Rex Humbard, pioneer radio and television evangelist. In 1958 Humbard established the Cathedral of Tomorrow in Akron, Ohio, from which he afterward based his television ministry.
2009
The Guardian reports charges by a Brazilian prosecutor that Edir Macedo and ten associate leaders in the eight-million-member Universal Kingdom of God, siphoned billions of dollars of charitable contributions on lavish personal expenses.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"