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Bible Commentaries

Sutcliffe's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 146

Verses 1-10

This, and the two following, are called the Hallelujah psalms of Haggai and of Zechariah the prophets, being composed after the captivity.

Psalms 146:10 . The Lord shall reign for ever; even thy God, oh Zion. Rabbi Jarchi refers this very justly to the reign of the Messiah. His giving sight to the blind seems to be the reference in Matthew 11:2; and also Isaiah 35:5-7. Zion here spiritually signifies the new-testament church, built on the tops of the mountains, and exalted above the hills. Micah 4:1.

REFLECTIONS.

This psalm is delicately touched by Dr. Watts: “I’ll praise my Maker with my breath.” In addition to what is said in Psalm 104. 106. 107., little need be added here. It breaks out in the Hebrew with amazing boldness: Hallelujah, praise the Lord, oh my soul. It teaches us confidence in God; for though it may be requisite to afflict mankind awhile for their sins, or for their instruction, the Lord thereby heightens the riches of his grace in affording help. Thus even our deepest afflictions, as well as our most signal mercies, are subjects of gratitude to God; and the rudest strokes of providence, strokes which cause frequent tears, shall ultimately terminate in hallelujahs and thanksgivings.

We have a contrast between trusting in the Lord, and trusting in princes, who die like the feeble insect, and that very day all their thoughts and fine promises perish. But the Lord lives to execute judgment, to be eyes to the blind, a husband to the widow, and a father to the orphan.

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Bibliographical Information
Sutcliffe, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 146". Sutcliffe's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/jsc/psalms-146.html. 1835.