corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.19.12.10
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Bible Commentaries

G. Campbell Morgan's Exposition on the Whole Bible
Psalms 100

 

 

Verses 1-5

This is the last song of the series, and forms a fitting conclusion to the movement which commenced in Psalms 93:1-5. There the Divine assumption of the throne and government was the subject. Here it is that of the benefits resulting to the whole earth. All lands are called upon to sing the song of His reign. The strength of their song is to be their service rendered with gladness. Israel is viewed as the witness to the Divine power and goodness.

The peoples are supposed to see the position of the chosen people in all its desirableness, and they are reminded that their well-being is the result of the government of God.

Then the great invitation is given to the outlying people to enter His gates, to yield to Him, and share in His benefits. This is the true position and witness of God’s chosen people according to His purpose for them, and through them, for others. It is a glimpse of a glory not realised by ancient people. They never learned how to invite the outsider into the place of privilege. Because of their failure to do this, Israel as an earthly people is scattered and peeled. The Church, the spiritual Israel, fulfills, or ought to fulfil this function.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography Information
Morgan, G. Campbell. "Commentary on Psalms 100:4". "G. Campbell Morgan Exposition on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gcm/psalms-100.html. 1857-84.

Lectionary Calendar
Tuesday, December 10th, 2019
the Second Week of Advent
ADVERTISEMENT
Commentary Navigator
Search This Commentary
Enter query in the box below
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology