Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 13:18

He said to him, "I also am a prophet like you, and an angel spoke to me by the word of the Lord , saying, ‘Bring him back with you to your house, that he may eat bread and drink water.'" But he lied to him.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Deception;   Falsehood;   Judgments;   Minister, Christian;   Prophets;   Temptation;   Scofield Reference Index - Miracles;   Thompson Chain Reference - Deception;   Truth-Falsehood;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Lying;   Offence;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Iddo;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Angels;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Miracles;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Bethel;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Angel;   Jadon;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Bethel ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Balaam;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Old Prophet, the;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Angelology;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

An angel spake unto me - That he lied unto him is here expressly asserted, and is amply proved by the event. But why should he deceive him? The simple principle of curiosity to know all about this prediction, and the strange facts which had taken place, of which he had heard at second hand by means of his sons, was sufficient to induce such a person to get the intelligence he wished by any means. We may add to this, that, as he found the man of God sitting under an oak, probably faint with fatigue and fasting, for he had had no refreshment, his humanity might have led him to practice this deception, in order to persuade him to take some refreshment. Having fallen from God, as I have supposed, 1 Kings 13:11, his own tenderness of conscience was gone; and he would not scruple to do a moral evil, if even a temporal good could come of it. Again, is it not possible that the old prophet was himself deceived? for, though he lied unto him, it is possible that he was not conscious of his lie, for Satan, as an angel of light, might have deceived him in order to lead him to deceive the other. He does not say, as the man of God did, It was said to me by the word of the Lord; no: but, An angel spake unto me by the word of the Lord. And I think it very likely that an angel did appear to him on the occasion; an angel of darkness and idolatry, in the garb of an angel of light, who wished to use him as an instrument to bring discredit on the awful transactions which had lately taken place, and to destroy him who had foretold the destruction of his power and influence.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-kings-13.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

But he lied unto him - It is always to be remembered that the prophetic gift might co-exist with various degrees of moral imperfection in the person possessing it. Note especially the case of Balaam.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-kings-13.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he said unto him,.... That is, the old prophet said to the man of God:

I am a prophet also as thou art; meaning, that he was a prophet of the true God, and not of any idol deity; that he not only believed in him, and was a worshipper of him, but had revelations from him, and of the same things this man of God had, and that he believed that what he had prophesied of would certainly come to pass:

and an angel spoke unto me by the word of the Lord; was sent and dispatched by the order of the Lord with the following message:

saying, bring him back with thee into thine house, that he may eat bread and drink water; and so be refreshed, and be fit to proceed on in his journey:

but he lied unto him; no messenger nor message being sent to him by the Lord, but was wholly a device and stratagem of his own to persuade the man of God to return with him, that he might have his company and conversation.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

He said unto him, I [am] a prophet also as thou [art]; and an h angel spake unto me by the word of the LORD, saying, Bring him back with thee into thine house, that he may eat bread and drink water. [But] he lied unto him.

(h) His fault is here double, first in that he did not permit the prophet to obey God's express commandment, and next that he pretended to have a revelation to the contrary.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/1-kings-13.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

an angel spake unto me by the word of the Lord — This circuitous mode of speaking, instead of simply saying, “the Lordspake to me,” was adopted to hide an equivocation, to conceal a double meaning - an inferior sense given to the word “angel” - to offer a seemingly superior authority to persuade the prophet, while really the authority was secretly known to the speaker to be inferior. The “angel,” that is, “messenger,” was his own sons, who were worshippers, perhaps priests, at Beth-el. As this man was governed by self-interest, and wished to curry favor with the king (whose purpose to adhere to his religious polity, he feared, might be shaken by the portents that had occurred), his hastening after the prophet of Judah, the deception he practiced, and the urgent invitation by which, on the ground of a falsehood, he prevailed on the too facile man of God to accompany him back to his house in Beth-el, were to create an impression in the king‘s mind that he was an impostor, who acted in opposition to his own statement.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-kings-13.html. 1871-8.

Scofield's Reference Notes

and an An impressive illustration of Galatians 1:8; Galatians 1:9.

angel (See Scofield "Hebrews 1:4").

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on 1 Kings 13:18". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/1-kings-13.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 13:18 He said unto him, I [am] a prophet also as thou [art]; and an angel spake unto me by the word of the LORD, saying, Bring him back with thee into thine house, that he may eat bread and drink water. [But] he lied unto him.

Ver. 18. I am a prophet also.] A prophet, and yet tell a lie! What a foul business is that! It was wont to be said, Sacerdos est, non fallet: Christianus est, non mentietur. But afterwards it became a proverb, ‘A friar a liar.’

And an angel spake unto me.] Lie and all; unless it were an angel of darkness, such as Pisanus (a) reporteth spake to John of Alvern, a friar, when in a rapture, indeed in a diabolical delusion, he was elevated above every creature; and his soul swallowed up in the abyss of the divinity.

By the word of the Lord.] This Bethelite boasting himself of a false gift, was like clouds and wind without rain, as the wise man hath it. [Proverbs 25:14]

That he may eat bread.] This, to a hungry man, was a sore temptation, and soon yielded unto.

But he lied unto him.] And thereby cheated him into the lion’s mouth: so do sect masters simple men and silly women, into the devil’s danger. Nothing is so apt to deceive as the fairest semblances, as the sweetest words. We cannot be deceived, saith a reverend writer, if we believe not the speech for the person, but the person for the speech. A good man, saith another, may act for Satan, and not discern it. [Matthew 16:23] Mr Archer, a holy man, did hold and broach hellish opinions. The temptation lieth in this, when angels from heaven, men of singular parts and piety, preach other doctrines. [Galatians 1:8]

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-13.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Not with evil design against him, but out of curiosity to know all the truth and circumstances from his own mouth, and to express his kindness to him, and to relieve his pressing hunger; whereby possibly he thought to please God, and to compensate for his miscarriages. But his sin was great; for he did not only tell a premeditated lie, but also made God a liar, and to contradict himself, and all this without any pretence of necessity, or benefit to himself.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-13.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18.I am a prophet also — “The door of his heart seems to have been standing ajar, almost half-opened already, to the invitations of the old man. Otherwise surely he would have said: Thou a prophet! How is it, then, that thou dwellest at Beth-el, the house of Jeroboam’s corrupt worship? If thou hadst been indeed a prophet of the Lord thou wouldst have denounced that worship, and I should not have been sent from Judah to lift up my voice against it.” — Wordsworth.

He lied unto him — Whatever may have been the conflicting emotions and controlling motives of the old prophet of Beth-el, his impious falsehood shows how fallen and depraved was his spiritual state.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-13.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Kings 13:18. But he lied unto him — And yet, probably, not with any evil design, but out of curiosity, to know from his own mouth the truth and all the particulars of the message which he had just delivered to Jeroboam; and to express his kindness to him, and relieve his hunger and weariness, whereby, possibly, he thought he should please God. In this, however, he greatly erred, and involved both himself and the prophet from Judah in guilt and wrath.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-kings-13.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

An angel spoke to me, &c. This old man of Bethel was indeed a prophet, but he sinned in thus deceiving the man of God; the more, because he pretended a revelation for what he did; (Challoner; Worthington) though he did it with a good intention, and supposed that the prophet had only been forbidden to eat with Jeroboam and his followers. (Theodoret, q. 42.) --- This lie might cause him to be styled, "a false prophet," by Josephus. Abulensis thinks he was a wicked man, like Balaam; and many suppose that he was the chief instrument in deluding the king. (Josephus; St. Gregory, &c.) --- After the man of God had been torn to pieces, he might easily persuade the people that he was only an impostor, and that the pretended miracles were merely the effects of natural causes. It is not certain that this man was inspired by God, ver. 20. --- Deceived. Hebrew, "he lied unto him, (Calmet) and thus caused him to transgress. (Worthington)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-13.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

an angel spake. A solemn warning for all who listen to any revelation outside Scripture which purports to come from God, even though an "old prophet" asserts it. Compare Galatians 1:1, Galatians 1:8, Galatians 1:9. Of all such it may be said "he lied unto him".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He said unto him, I am a prophet also as thou art; and an angel spake unto me by the word of the LORD, saying, Bring him back with thee into thine house, that he may eat bread and drink water. But he lied unto him.

An angel spake unto me by the word of the Lord. This circuitous mode of speaking, instead of simply saying, 'the Lord spake to me,' was adopted to hide an equivocation, to conceal a double meaning-an inferior sense given to the word angel-to offer a seemingly superior authority to persuade the prophet, while really the authority was secretly, known to the speaker to be inferior. The "angel," i:e., the messenger, was his own sons, who were worshippers, perhaps priests at Beth-el; and as this man was governed by self-interest, and wished to curry favour with the king, whose purpose to adhere to his religious polity, he feared, might be shaken by the portents that had occurred, his hastening after the prophet of Judah, the deception he practiced, and the urgent invitation by which, on the ground of a falsehood, he prevailed on the too facile man of God to accompany him back to his house in Beth-el, were to create an impression in the king's mind that he was an impostor, who acted in opposition to his own statement.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-kings-13.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) An angel spake unto me.—The lie was gross, and ought to have been obvious to one who had received a plain command, and must have known that “God was not a man that He should lie, or the son of man that He should repent.” It was believed, no doubt, because it chimed in with some secret reluctance to obey, and, by obedience, to give up all reward and hospitality. Hence the belief was a self-deceit, and, as such, culpable. It is inexplicable that the condemnation which it drew down should have been thought strange by any who understands human nature, and knows the self-deceiving colour which our wish gives to our thought. (See the famous Sermon of Bishop Butler on “Self-deceit.”)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-kings-13.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He said unto him, I am a prophet also as thou art; and an angel spake unto me by the word of the LORD, saying, Bring him back with thee into thine house, that he may eat bread and drink water. But he lied unto him.
an angel
Numbers 22:35; Judges 6:11,12; 13:3
But
Genesis 3:4,5; Isaiah 9:15; Jeremiah 5:12,31; 23:14,17,32; 28:15,16; Ezekiel 13:9,10,22; Matthew 7:15; 24:24; Romans 16:18; 2 Corinthians 11:3,13-15; 2 Peter 2:1; 1 John 4:1; Revelation 19:20
Reciprocal: Genesis 27:19 - I am;  Exodus 18:17 - not good;  Leviticus 19:11 - lie one;  Deuteronomy 13:1 - a prophet;  1 Samuel 2:24 - ye make;  1 Samuel 21:2 - The king;  1 Kings 20:35 - in the word;  2 Kings 5:22 - My master;  2 Kings 18:25 - Amos I now;  Proverbs 11:9 - An hypocrite;  Isaiah 36:10 - GeneralJeremiah 28:11 - Thus;  Micah 2:11 - a man;  Romans 3:7 - if the truth;  Ephesians 4:25 - putting;  1 Thessalonians 4:15 - by the;  1 Timothy 4:2 - lies

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-13.html.