Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 13:30

He laid his body in his own grave, and they mourned over him, saying, "Alas, my brother!"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Brother;   Conscience;   Minister, Christian;   Prophecy;   Scofield Reference Index - Miracles;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Josiah;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Burial;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jadon;   Mourning Customs;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Bethel ;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ah;   Old Prophet, the;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Alas, my brothers - This lamentation is very simple, very short, and very pathetic. Perhaps the old prophet said it as much in reference to himself, who had been the cause of his untimely death, as in reference to the man of God, whose corpse he now committed to the tomb. But the words may be no more than the burden of each line of the lamentation which was used on this occasion. See instances of this among the Asiatics in the note on Jeremiah 22:18; (note).

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-kings-13.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He laid his carcase in his own grave - As Joseph of Arimathaea did the body of our Lord Matthew 27:60. The possession of rock-hewn tombs by families, or individuals, was common among the Jews from their first entrance into the holy land to their final expulsion. A sepulchre usually consisted of an underground apartment, into which opened a number of long, narrow “loculi,” or cells, placed side by side, each adapted to receive one body. The cells were 6 or 7 feet long, 2 feet wide, and 3 feet high. They were commonly closed by a stone placed at the end of each. Many such tombs still exist in Palestine.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-kings-13.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he laid his carcass in his own grave,.... Which he had prepared for himself; for, as he came from Samaria, it could not be the sepulchre of his fathers; and this was showing all the respect, and doing all the honour to him, he well could:

and they mourned over him; the prophet and his sons: saying,

alas, my brother; which was an usual form of lamentation at funerals in later times, see Jeremiah 22:18.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And he laid his carcase in his m own grave; and they mourned over him, [saying], Alas, my brother!

(m) Which he had prepared for himself.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/1-kings-13.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he laid his carcase in his own grave; and they mourned over him, saying, Alas, my brother!

His grave — So that threatening, verse22, was fulfilled; and withal, the memory of his prophecy was revived and preserved among them, and his very carcase resting there, might be a witness of their madness and desperate wickedness, in continuing in their abominable idolatry, after such an assurance of the dreadful effects of it.

They — The old prophet and his sons, and others, whom common humanity taught to lament the untimely death of so worthy a person.

Alas, … — Which was an usual form of expression in funeral-lamentations.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-kings-13.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 13:30 And he laid his carcase in his own grave; and they mourned over him, [saying], Alas, my brother!

Ver. 30. In his own grave.] Which was ready made, it seems. See the like, Matthew 27:60. Charles V carried the materials of his tomb with him up and down in his warlike expeditions.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-13.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

So that threatening, 1 Kings 13:22, was fulfilled; and withal, the memory of his prophecy was revived and preserved among them, and his very carcass resting there might be a witness of their madness and desperate wickedness, in continuing their abominable idolatry after such an assurance of the dreadful effects of it.

They mourned over him; the old prophet, and his sons, and others, whom common humanity taught to lament the untimely death of so worthy a person.

Alas, my brother! was a usual form of expression in funeral lamentations. See Jeremiah 22:18.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-13.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

30.Alas, my brother — His mourning doubtless came from the depths of his heart. The mere facts of the intercourse of these two prophets are profoundly impressive. The old prophet of Beth-el could not but think that he had been instrumental in his brother’s fall.

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-13.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Brother. Such titles were customary, Jeremias xxii. 18. (Menochius)

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Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-13.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

grave = sepulchre. Hebrew. keber, a burying-place, a pit. Compare App-35.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-13.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he laid his carcase in his own grave; and they mourned over him, saying, Alas, my brother!
mourned over
14:13; Jeremiah 22:18; Acts 8:2
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 13:22 - carcase;  2 Kings 23:17 - It is the sepulchre;  Mark 6:29 - they came

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:30". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-13.html.