Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 13:6

The king said to the man of God, "Please entreat the Lord your God, and pray for me, that my hand may be restored to me." So the man of God entreated the Lord , and the king's hand was restored to him, and it became as it was before.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Beth-El;   Forgiveness;   Intercession;   Jeroboam;   Judgments;   Miracles;   Reproof;   Scofield Reference Index - Miracles;   Thompson Chain Reference - Intercession;   Intercessory Prayer;   Miracles;   Prayer;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Miracles Wrought through Servants of God;   Prayer, Answers to;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Iddo;   Miracle;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jeroboam;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Prayer;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Bethel;   Jeroboam;   Prophecy, Prophets;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jadon;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Bethel ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Law of Moses;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jeroboam;   Prophets;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Intercession;   Old Prophet, the;   Withered;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Entreat - the face of the Lord thy God - The face of God is his favor, as we see in many parts of the sacred writings. He says, thy God; for Jeroboam knew that he was not his God, for he was now in the very act of acknowledging other gods, and had no portion in the God of Jacob.

And the king's hand was restored - Both miracles were wrought to show the truth of the Jewish religion, and to convince this bold innovator of his wickedness, and to reclaim him from the folly and ruinous tendency of his idolatry.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-kings-13.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the king answered and said unto the man of God,.... In another tone than when he bid the people lay hold on him; not in a haughty, but humble manner; not as threatening, but supplicating:

entreat now the face of the Lord thy God; he does not say "my God", for he had apostatized from him, and served other gods, but "thy" God, whose prophet he was, and who had an interest in him, as clearly appeared by what he had said and done by him;

and pray for me, that my hand may be restored me again; not that the anger of God might be turned away from him, and he enjoy the divine favour, and have an application of pardoning grace made to him, only to have this outward mercy, this temporal favour restored to him, the use of his hand:

and the man of God besought the Lord; not rendering evil for evil; but being of a forgiving spirit, though the king had stretched out his hand against him, he lifted up his hands to heaven for him:

and the king's hand was restored again, and became as it was before; which was another instance of divine power, and a further proof of the prophet's divine mission; from whence it might be concluded, that what he had prophesied of would be fulfilled, and was an instance also of divine goodness to the king, which should have led him to repentance, but did not.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And the king answered and said unto the man of God, e Intreat now the face of the LORD thy God, and pray for me, that my hand may be restored me again. And the man of God besought the LORD, and the king's hand was restored him again, and became as [it was] before.

(e) Though the wicked humble themselves for a time when they feel God's judgment, they return to their old malice and declare that they are but vile hypocrites.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/1-kings-13.html. 1599-1645.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

(6) And the king answered and said unto the man of God, Intreat now the face of the LORD thy God, and pray for me, that my hand may be restored me again. And the man of God besought the LORD, and the king's hand was restored him again, and became as it was before.

Observe, Jeroboam prays the prophet to intercede for the recovery of his hand, but not his heart. Like another Pharaoh, he desired the punishment to be taken off, but not a word of the Lord's making off the cause. And yet what could testify the merciful tenderness of the Lord to pardon sin more than thus instantly restoring Jeroboam's hand at the instance of his servant. Precious Jesus! was not this interceding of the prophet a type of the ever-prevailing efficacy of thy intercession at the right hand of power, for the poor withered souls of thy people?

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/1-kings-13.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And the king answered and said unto the man of God, Intreat now the face of the LORD thy God, and pray for me, that my hand may be restored me again. And the man of God besought the LORD, and the king's hand was restored him again, and became as it was before.

Thy God — Who hath manifested himself to be thy God and friend, in a singular manner; and therefore will hear thy prayers for me, though he will not regard mine, because I have forsaken him and his worship.

Besought — To assure Jeroboam, that what he had said, was not from ill-will to him, and that he heartily desired his reformation, and not his ruin.

Restored — Because he repented of that violence, which he intended against that prophet, for which God inflicted it: and that this goodness of God to him, might have led him to repentance; or, if he continued impenitent, leave him without excuse.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-kings-13.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 13:6 And the king answered and said unto the man of God, Intreat now the face of the LORD thy God, and pray for me, that my hand may be restored me again. And the man of God besought the LORD, and the king’s hand was restored him again, and became as [it was] before.

Ver. 6. Intreat now the face - seek the favour for me - of the Lord thy God.] He could not say, My God, for he had chosen other gods, forsaken his own mercies, and was miserable by his own election.

And the king’s hand was restored again.] Such is the power of prayer. [James 5:16] A like example we find in Nicephorns and Cedrenus, of a certain profane painter in Constantinople, who, assaying to paint Christ in the form of Jupiter, had his hand in like sort dried up and withered. But upon humble confession of his fault, he was healed again, at the devout prayer of Gennadius, bishop of that city.

And became as it was before.] But his heart continued as hard and inflexible as ever. See on 1 Kings 13:4.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-13.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The king answered, i.e. spoke, as that word is oft used in both Testaments.

Entreat now the face of the Lord thy God, who by his zeal for time hath manifested himself to be thy God and Friend in a singular manner; and therefore will hear thy prayers for me, though he will not regard mine, because I have forsaken him and his worship.

The man of God besought the Lord, to assure Jeroboam that what he had said was not from ill-will to him, and that he heartily desired his reformation, not his ruin.

The king’s hand was restored again; partly, to assure him that the stroke was from God; partly, because he repented of that violence which he intended against the prophet, for which God inflicted it; and partly, that the goodness of God to him might have led him to repentance; or if he continued impenitent, leave him without all excuse.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-13.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6.Entreat now the face of the Lord — More literally, Stroke the face. Caress; entreat so imploringly that you cannot be refused. The king’s alarm and momentary terror was like that of the sorcerer Simon. Acts 8:24.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-13.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Kings 13:6. The king said, Entreat now the face of the Lord thy God — Of him who hath manifested himself to be thy God and friend in a singular manner; and therefore will hear thy prayers for me, though he will not regard mine, because I have forsaken him and his worship. The man of God besought the Lord — This he did to assure Jeroboam that what he had said was not from ill-will to him, and that he heartily desired his reformation, not his ruin. And the king’s hand was restored — God showed him this mercy, 1st, Because he repented of the violence intended against the prophet, for which his hand had been dried up: 2d, To assure him that the stroke was from God: and, 3d, That this goodness of God to him might lead him to repentance, or if he continued impenitent, might leave him without excuse.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-kings-13.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Thy God. He does not say my, being conscious that he had abandoned his service. (Menochius) --- Before. We may be surprised that God thus heals a man, whose heart was not changed, ver. 33. (Estius) --- But miracles do not always work a conversion. Pharao, Saul, and Achaz beheld the in vain: only one of the ten lepers returned to give thanks, Luke xvii. 17. This miracle rendered Jeroboam still more inexcusable. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-13.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

thy God. He dare not say "my God".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-13.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the king answered and said unto the man of God, Intreat now the face of the LORD thy God, and pray for me, that my hand may be restored me again. And the man of God besought the LORD, and the king's hand was restored him again, and became as it was before.
now
Exodus 8:8,28; 9:28; 10:17; 12:32; Numbers 21:7; 1 Samuel 12:19; Jeremiah 37:3; 42:2-4; Acts 8:24; James 5:16; Revelation 3:9
besought
Exodus 8:12,13; Numbers 12:13; 1 Samuel 12:23; Matthew 5:44; Luke 6:27,28; 23:34; Acts 7:60; Romans 12:14,21; James 5:16-18
Lord
Heb. face of the Lord.
Reciprocal: Genesis 20:7 - pray;  Numbers 12:11 - I beseech thee;  Deuteronomy 33:1 - the man;  Judges 11:8 - the elders;  2 Kings 1:13 - besought;  Zechariah 7:2 - pray before the Lord;  Mark 3:5 - Stretch;  Luke 6:10 - Stretch

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 13:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-13.html.