Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 14:4

Jeroboam's wife did so, and arose and went to Shiloh, and came to the house of Ahijah. Now Ahijah could not see, for his eyes were dim because of his age.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Abijah;   Blindness;   Jeroboam;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Prophets;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Abijah;   Ahijah;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jeroboam;   Shiloh;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Blind;   Jeroboam;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - High Places;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Abijah;   Aging;   Ahiah;   Ahijah;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abijah;   Age, Aged, Old Age;   Medicine;   Shiloh;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Abijah ;   Ahijah ;   Shiloh ;   Shilonite ;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jeroboam;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ahijah;   Blindness;   Shiloh (2);   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Abijah;   Blindness;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Abijah;   Ahijah (the Prophet);  

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Jeroboam's wife did so, and went to Shiloh, and came to the house of Abijah,.... Disguised herself, and took this long journey, and found the prophet's house; which she did partly in obedience to her husband, and partly from affection to her child: but Abijah could not see; her or anybody else that came into the room to him:

for his eyes were set by reason of his age; or "stood" fixed and immovable, as the eyes of blind men are; or the nerves and muscles of his eyes stood within the holes thereof, so that he could not see objects.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-14.html. 1999.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 14:4 And Jeroboam’s wife did so, and arose, and went to Shiloh, and came to the house of Ahijah. But Ahijah could not see; for his eyes were set by reason of his age.

Ver. 4. And Jeroboam’s wife did so.] Putting off her royal attire, and putting on more demure apparel; like as many hypocrites do, conforming themselves to the company they come into, and walking in a disguise, till God detect them.

For his eyes were set by reason of his age.] These things, therefore, were done toward the end of Jeroboam’s reign.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Kings 14:4. Ahijah could not see, for his eyes were set by reason of his age The more nearly we examine the structure of the human body, and the more attentively we consider it, the more we are struck with admiration. All, even the hardest parts, as the bones and cartilages, derive their origin from a fluid matter: but in old age the softest membranes grow hard, and the fluids themselves become subject to the laws of petrifaction. The smaller tubes, through which the fluids pass, are tender and flexible in youth, but acquire solidity till the age of perfection; and, at last, in old age harden and even ossify in several parts. Hence the long train of maladies, hence old age, which is itself a malady. The eyes, which are a real camera obscura constructed with infinite art, have not only the faculty of moving in every sense, in children, in adults, and in grown men; but by a certain subtle mechanism, the retina sometimes draws near, sometimes removes from the crystalline, according as the objects are more or less distant: and nature, without our knowing it, and even in spite of us, does in the highest perfection what art effects in a camera obscura, by drawing near, or removing, a paper or cloth from the glass through which the light enters. But in decrepid age this painting naturally goes off, the eyes grow dark, like those of Ahijah, the fibres lose their flexibility, the eyes wrinkle, and at length we see distant objects more distinctly than those which are near; and when the space which is between the retina and crystalline comes to be so blocked up, as that the rays of light can no more centre in this thin tunicle, the person then becomes blind.

Note; (1.) The ministers of God must not be courtiers, but deliver their message to the great, however disagreeable, with boldness and freedom. (2.) Disguises may pass upon men whose dim sight cannot see through the veil; but no covering can hide the hypocrite from the eye of God. (3.) They who hope to recommend themselves to God by their formal duties and services, like Jeroboam's wife with her present, will find a terrible disappointment, when, among hypocrites, their portion shall be allotted in the outer darkness.

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:4". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-kings-14.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Or, stood still, or were grown stiff; the nerves, by which the eyes and eye-lids are moved, being contracted and withered.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4.Ahijah could not see — “Upon the outer world, made foul by man’s abominations, he has closed his eyes, and sees and lives by the light that shines within.” — Kitto. And vainly will Jeroboam or his wife attempt, in the presence of such a divinely-illumined seer, to practice guile.

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-14.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Kings 14:4. But Ahijah could not see — He not only lived obscure and neglected in Shiloh, but was blind through age: yet he was still blessed with the visions of the Almighty; which require not bodily eyes; but are rather favoured by the want of them, the eyes of the mind being then most intent and least diverted. His eyes were set, &c. — Hebrew, קמו משׁיבו, kamu misheibo, stood for his hoariness — No longer performed their office, by reason of his great age. Perhaps the fibres and muscles by which the eyes and eye-lids are moved, were contracted and withered, the optic nerves become effete, or film or cataract was grown over his eyes.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:4". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-kings-14.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Dim. Hebrew, "swelled," &c. (Calmet) --- Septuagint inform us that the prophet was 60 years old. (Haydock)

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Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:4". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

were set. Compare 1 Samuel 4:15. One of the nine afflicted with blindness. See note on Genesis 19:11.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-14.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) Were set.—The same word is rendered “were dim” in 1 Samuel 4:15. The metaphor is evidently drawn from the solid opaque look of the iris, when affected by cataract or some similar disease.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-kings-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Jeroboam's wife did so, and arose, and went to Shiloh, and came to the house of Ahijah. But Ahijah could not see; for his eyes were set by reason of his age.
Shiloh
11:29; Joshua 18:1; 1 Samuel 4:3,4; Jeremiah 7:12-14
for his eyes
Genesis 27:1; 48:10; Deuteronomy 34:7; 1 Samuel 3:2; 4:15; Psalms 90:10; Ecclesiastes 12:3
were set by reason of his age
Heb. stood for his hoariness.
Reciprocal: Ezekiel 14:2 - General

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-14.html.