Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 16:2

"Inasmuch as I exalted you from the dust and made you leader over My people Israel, and you have walked in the way of Jeroboam and have made My people Israel sin, provoking Me to anger with their sins,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Anger;   Baasha;   Government;   Ingratitude;   Jeroboam;   Promotion;   Prophecy;   Thompson Chain Reference - Anger;   God;   God's;   Wrath-Anger;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Jews, the;   Sin;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Hanani;   Jehu;   Zimri;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Baasha;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Issachar;   Samaria;   Zimri;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Jehu;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Baasha ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Nimshi;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Baasha;   Jehu;   Kings;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Ba'asha;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   Babylonish Captivity, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Baasha;   Prince;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Made thee prince over my people - That is, in the course of my providence, I suffered thee to become king; for it is impossible that God should make a rebel, a traitor, and a murderer, king over his people, or over any people. God is ever represented in Scripture as doing those things which, in the course of his providence, he permits to be done.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-kings-16.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Forasmuch as I exalted thee out of the dust,.... From a very low estate, and mean family:

and made thee prince over my people Israel; as they were of right, and ought to have been; and though Baasha got the kingdom by treachery and murder, yet the translation of the kingdom to him was according to the appointment of God, and by his overruling providence; and even his act of killing Nadab was a fulfilment of a prophecy of his; and had he done it in obedience to the will of God, and in vengeance for his sin, would not have been blameworthy, since then he would have been an executioner of the, justice of God:

and thou hast walked in the way of Jeroboam, and hast made my people Israel to sin, to provoke me to anger with their sins; committing and encouraging the same idolatrous practices, so very provoking to God.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-16.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

a Forasmuch as I exalted thee out of the dust, and made thee prince over my people Israel; and thou hast walked in the way of Jeroboam, and hast made my people Israel to sin, to provoke me to anger with their sins;

(a) Thus spoke Jehu to Baasha in the Name of the Lord.
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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/1-kings-16.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Forasmuch as I exalted thee — The doom he pronounced on Baasha was exactly the same as denounced against Jeroboam and his posterity. Though he had waded through slaughter to his throne, he owed his elevation to the appointment or permission of Him “by whom kings reign.”

over my people Israel — With all their errors and lapses into idolatry, they were not wholly abandoned by God. He still showed His interest in them by sending prophets and working miracles in their favor, and possessed a multitude of faithful worshippers in the kingdom of Israel.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-kings-16.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Forasmuch as I exalted thee out of the dust, and made thee prince over my people Israel; and thou hast walked in the way of Jeroboam, and hast made my people Israel to sin, to provoke me to anger with their sins;

I made thee — Though that invading the kingdom was from himself, and his own wicked heart; yet the translation of the kingdom from Nadab to Baasha simply considered, was from God, who by his providence disposed of all occasions, and of the hearts of the soldiers and people, so that Baasha should have opportunity of executing God's judgment upon Nadab; nay, the very act of Baasha, the killing his master Nadab, was an act of divine justice. And if Baasha had done this in obedience to God's command, and with a single design, to execute God's vengeance threatened against him, it had been no more a sin, than Jehu's act in killing his master king Jehoram, upon the same account, 2 Kings 9:24. But Baasha did this, merely to gratify his own pride, or covetousness, or malice, verse7.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-kings-16.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 16:2 Forasmuch as I exalted thee out of the dust, and made thee prince over my people Israel; and thou hast walked in the way of Jeroboam, and hast made my people Israel to sin, to provoke me to anger with their sins;

Ver. 2. Forasmuch as I exalted thee.] See 1 Kings 14:7. Ingentia beneficia, flagitia, supplicia, say the Centurists.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-16.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Kings 16:2. Forasmuch as I exalted thee It may be asked, how Baasha's exaltation to the kingdom of Israel can be ascribed to God, when it is manifest that he gained it by his own treachery and cruelty? To which it may be replied, that though the manner of invading the kingdom was from himself and his own wicked heart, yet the translation of the kingdom from Nadab to Baasha, simply considered, was from God, who by his decree and Providence ordered it, and so disposed of all occasions, and of the hearts of all the soldiers and the people, that Baasha should have opportunity to execute his judgments upon Nadab, and such success thereupon, as should procure him an immediate and quiet possession of the kingdom. So that his accession to the kingdom was from the divine decree, though the form and manner of his accession was from himself, from his own ambition and covetousness; and, as it was wicked and cruel, is therefore charged upon him, 1 Kings 16:7 as a wilful murder.

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-kings-16.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Out of the dust; out of a low and mean estate. See 1 Samuel 2:8 Psalms 113:7.

Quest: How is Baasha’s exaltation to the kingdom ascribed to God, when he got it by treachery and cruelty? Answ. Though that way or manner of invading the kingdom was from himself, and his own wicked heart; yet the translation of the kingdom from Nadab to Baasha, simply considered, was from God, who by his decree and providence ordered it, and disposed of all occasions, and of the hearts of all the soldiers and people, so that Baasha should have opportunity of executing God’s judgment upon Nadab; and such success thereupon, that he should get a present and quiet possession of the kingdom. Nay, the very act of Baasha, to wit, the killing of his master Nadab, was an act of Divine justice, foretold and appointed by God, 1 Kings 14:10. And if Baasha had done this in obedience to God’s command, and with a single design to execute God’s vengeance threatened against him, it had been no more a sin than Jehu’s act in killing his master king Jehoram, upon the same account, 2Ki 9. But that Baasha did this merely to gratify his own pride, or covetousness, or malice, this was not from God, but from himself, and therefore is charged upon him as murder here, 1 Kings 16:7.

To provoke me to anger: See Poole "1 Kings 14:9".

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-16.html. 1685.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Kings 16:2. Forasmuch as I exalted thee out of the dust — Probably from a mean family in the tribe of Issachar. Perhaps he was but a common soldier, or some very inferior officer in the army which besieged Gibbethon; but, being bold and daring, he formed a conspiracy against Nadab. The message which this prophet brought to Baasha is much the same with that which Ahijah sent to Jeroboam by his wife. 1st, He reminds him of the great things God had done for him: 2d, He charges him with high crimes and misdemeanours; and, 3d, He fore-tels the same destruction to come upon his family which he himself had been employed to bring on the family of Jeroboam. And made thee prince over my people Israel — But it may be asked, how Baasha’s exaltation to the kingdom can he ascribed to God, when it is manifest he obtained it by his own treachery and cruelty? To this Mr. Poole replies, that “though the manner of invading the kingdom was from himself and his own wicked heart, yet, the translation of the kingdom from Nadab to Baasha, simply considered, was from God, who by his decree and providence ordered it, and disposed of all occasions, and of the hearts of all the soldiers, and the people so, that Baasha should have the opportunity of executing God’s judgment upon Nadab, and such success thereon, as should procure him a present and quiet possession of the kingdom.” So that his accession to the kingdom was from the divine decree; but the form and manner of his accession was from himself, from his own ambition and covetousness, which induced him to kill Nadab; and as it was wicked and cruel, it is therefore charged upon him as a wilful murder, 1 Kings 16:7.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-kings-16.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

I have. All power comes from God, though he frequently disapproves of the means by which people obtain it. (Haydock) --- Baasa was a traitorous usurper. --- My people. Many had abandoned the Lord: (Haydock) yet he still regards Israel as his people, sending prophets to reclaim them, and preserving many from bending the knee before Baal.

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Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-16.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

prince: or captain = one raised up. Hebrew. nagid.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-16.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Forasmuch as I exalted thee out of the dust, and made thee prince over my people Israel; and thou hast walked in the way of Jeroboam, and hast made my people Israel to sin, to provoke me to anger with their sins;

Forasmuch as I exalted thee. The doom he pronounced on Baasha was exactly the same as denounced against Jeroboam and his posterity. Though he had waded through slaughter to his throne, he owed his elevation to the appointment or permission of Him "by whom kings reign."

Over my people Israel. With all their errors and lapses into idolatry, they were not wholly abandoned by God. He still showed His interest in them, by seeding prophets and working miracles in their favour, and possessed a multitude of faithful worshippers in the kingdom of Israel.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-kings-16.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) Forasmuch as I exalted thee . . .—The prophecy—closely resembling that of Ahijah against Jeroboam—clearly shows that Baasha had a probation, which he neglected; and it seems to be implied in 1 Kings 16:7 that his guilt was enhanced by perseverance in the very sins for which, by his hand, so terrible a vengeance had been inflicted.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-kings-16.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Forasmuch as I exalted thee out of the dust, and made thee prince over my people Israel; and thou hast walked in the way of Jeroboam, and hast made my people Israel to sin, to provoke me to anger with their sins;
I exalted thee
14:7; 1 Samuel 2:8,27,28; 15:17-19; 2 Samuel 12:7-11; Psalms 113:7,8; Luke 1:52
thou has walked
13:33,34; 15:34
has made my people
14:16; 15:26; Exodus 32:21; 1 Samuel 2:24; 26:19; Matthew 5:19
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 16:7 - the hand;  1 Kings 16:26 - he walked;  2 Kings 9:6 - over the people

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 16:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-16.html.