Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 3:5

In Gibeon the Lord appeared to Solomon in a dream at night; and God said, "Ask what you wish Me to give you."
New American Standard

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Children;   Communion;   Dream;   Gibeon;   God;   Prayer;   Solomon;   Scofield Reference Index - Bible Prayers;   Thompson Chain Reference - Appearances;   Ask;   Divine;   Dreams;   God;   Prayer;   Solomon;   Tests, Spiritual;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Dreams;   Night;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Dream;   Solomon;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Kings, First and Second, Theology of;   Prayer;   Sleep;   Theophany;   Wisdom;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Dream;   Gibeon;   Prayer;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Dream;   Ecclesiastes, the Book of;   Kings, the Books of;   Solomon;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Gibeon;   Intercession;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Night;   Oracles;   Pilgrimage;   Prayer;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Dreams;   Israel;   Magic, Divination, and Sorcery;   Solomon;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Dream (2);   Worldliness (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Gibeon ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Dream;   Gibeon;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Palm;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Appear;   Augury;   Divide;   Dream;   Intercession;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Dreams;   Heart;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for August 30;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The Lord appeared to Solomon in a dream - This was the night after he had offered the sacrifices, (see 2 Chronicles 1:7;), and probably after he had earnestly prayed for wisdom; see Wis. 7:7: Wherefore I prayed, and understanding was given me: I called upon God, and the spirit of wisdom came to me. If this were the case, the dream might have been the consequence of his earnest prayer for wisdom: the images of those things which occupy the mind during the day are most likely to recur during the night; and this, indeed, is the origin of the greater part of our dreams. But this appears to have been supernatural.

Gregory Nyssen, speaking of different kinds of dreams, observes that our organs and brain are not unlike a musical instrument; while the strings of such instruments have their proper degree of tension, they give, when touched, a harmonious sound, but as soon as they are relaxed or screwed down, they give no sound at all. During our waking hours, our senses, touched by our reason, produce the most harmonious concert; but as soon as we are asleep, the instrument is no longer capable of emitting any sound, unless it happen that the remembrance of what passed during the day returns and presents itself to the mind while we are asleep, and so forms a dream; just as the strings of an instrument continue to emit feeble sounds for some time after the musician has ceased to strike them. - See Greg. Nyss. De opificio hominis, cap. xii., p. 77. Oper. vol. i., edit. Morell., Par. 1638.

This may account, in some measure, for common dreams: but even suppose we should not allow that Solomon had been the day before earnestly requesting the gift of wisdom from God, yet we might grant that such a dream as this might be produced by the immediate influence of God upon the soul. And if Solomon received his wisdom by immediate inspiration from heaven, this was the kind of dream that he had; a dream by which that wisdom was actually communicated. But probably we need not carry this matter so much into miracle: God might be the author of his extraordinary wisdom, as he was the author of his extraordinary riches. Some say, "He lay down as ignorant as other men, and yet arose in the morning wiser than all the children of men." I think this is as credible as that he lay down with a scanty revenue, and in the morning, when he arose, found his treasury full. In short, God's especial blessing brought him riches through the medium of his own care and industry; as the inspiration of the Almighty gave him understanding, while he gave his heart to seek and search out by his wisdom, concerning all things under the sun, Ecclesiastes 1:13. God gave him the seeds of an extraordinary understanding, and, by much study and research, they grew up under the Divine blessing, and produced a plentiful harvest; but, alas! they did not continue to grow.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-kings-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The Lord appeared unto Solomon in a dream - Compare the marginal references and Genesis 15:1; Genesis 28:12; Genesis 37:5.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-kings-3.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

In Gibeon the Lord appeared to Solomon in a dream by night,.... This was not a common natural dream, but an extraordinary, divine, and supernatural one, a prophetic dream, a night vision, such as God used to speak in to his prophets; in which he had the full use of his reasoning powers, was under divine impressions, and in a spiritual frame of mind, and in the exercise of grace; it was not a mere dream that the Lord did appear to him, but he really did appear to him while sleeping and dreaming, by some display of his glory in some way or another:

and God said, ask what I shall give thee; he did not hereby dream that God said to him, but he really did say this; bid him ask what he would and it should be given him; he knew what he designed to give, but he would have it asked of him, as he will be inquired of by all his people to do that for them which he has intended and provided for them; and it is encouragement enough for them to ask, since he has promised to give.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-3.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

In Gibeon the Lord appeared to Solomon in a dream — It was probably at the close of this season, when his mind had been elevated into a high state of religious fervor by the protracted services. Solomon felt an intense desire, and he had offered an earnest petition, for the gift of wisdom. In sleep his thoughts ran upon the subject of his prayer, and he dreamed that God appeared to him and gave him the option of every thing in the world - that he asked wisdom, and that God granted his request (1 Kings 3:9-12). His dream was but an imaginary repetition of his former desire, but God‘s grant of it was real.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-kings-3.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

(5) ¶ In Gibeon the LORD appeared to Solomon in a dream by night: and God said, Ask what I shall give thee.

The Old Testament scriptures hold forth to us many examples of this kind, of the Lord's appearing to his servants in dreams and visions of the night. But, Reader, do you suppose that the chosen people of the Lord were more favoured on this account than they are now? Since the Son of God came down and tabernacled among us, was it to make our privileges less? If so, might we not say, " Lord! thou appearedst to Solomon and others in days of old, and didst bid them ask of thee blessings. Bring us back to these darker dispensations again!" - Reader, what say you to this? Could you use such language? And yet doth not, in fact, everyone in reality say this, and even worse, who doth not by faith keep up a constant communion, through Jesus, with our covenant God in him, with full assurance, according to Jesus's own promise, that whatsoever we ask the Father in his name, he will give it. John 16:23. Did we but believe, heartily and cordially believe, the record that God hath given of his dear Son, we should, as heartily and cordially believe also, that all that Jesus hath promised is yea and amen in, him. So far, therefore, is it from our privileges being lessened since redemption-work was finished by Jesus, that they are increased beyond all conception of increase. And, instead of the Lord now appearing to his people in visions and dreams of the night, he manifests himself to them by faith in the clearest tokens of noonday. If a man love me, (saith Jesus) he will keep my words; and my Father will love him, and we will come and make our abode with him. And so of the Spirit of truth, the promise is the same, though the world cannot receive him, because it seeth him not, neither knoweth him; but ye know him, for he dwelleth with you, and shall be in you. Oh! precious, precious consideration, in proof of the indwelling residence of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, in the hearts of the Lord's people! See John 14:23 and John 14:17.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/1-kings-3.html. 1828.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

WHAT IS YOUR IDEAL?

‘And God said: Ask what I shall give thee.’

1 Kings 3:5

Our ideal means that in which we most thoroughly believe as good and worth having, that which we consider to be the true object of our life. If it be low and poor, we may become lords, or we may become millionaires, but our lives will be low and poor also; if it be noble and lofty, we may be paupers like Luther, or lepers like Father Damien, but our lives will be lofty and noble too.

I. What is your ideal?—It is too probable that the question takes many men and women by surprise. Ideal? We have none. What are we aiming at? Why, nothing at all. Yes, that is the curse of it. So many have no object. Men and women often drift hither and thither through life, never turning an eye to the guiding reins which to them have become useless. Do we not know scores of such moral ciphers?—petty in all their aims, not to be trusted at any time, without depth, without worth, without stability. We do not go to them when we need advice, we do not look to them when we crave for sympathy; as for asking them to be interested in any generous and unselfish aim, or to subscribe for any kind or worthy purpose, we never dream of it. If they are not often swept away into some unknown abyss of crime by some sudden hurricane of temptation, it is only because the devil, secure of these Laodiceans already, and not thinking much of them, though they think so much of themselves, does not deem them worth any expenditure of his energy.

But, if we have an ideal and aim, how infinitely important it is that it should be a worthy one! Many men have some ideal that they admire of persons or conditions. Very strange are the ideals of some men. To one class, the successful jockey seems to be the supreme of men, or the successful prize-fighter; and the personal effects of these heroes sell at fancy prices, so small are human aspirations. To others, the man of fashion seems to be the one to be admired, or the sleek man of business who has made money, and has his suburban villa and drives to his counting-house in his neatly-appointed brougham. These are the little gods of little men. And to what strange results such ideals lead!

Perhaps, however, men more often idealise conditions than they make heroes of persons; they set before them something which they desire and, because the object of their desire is often ignoble or delusive, they end in degradation, disappointment, or despair. It is a very fatal thing to have an inferior or a mistaken end in view. It is like steering straight upon a rock. And it is really marvellous how generation after generation, in spite of all experience, men go on being deceived. The Mohammedan legend about Christ is full of insight, but he compared the man who desired only earthly things to one who drinks sea water, and becomes more thirsty the more he drinks, and dies mad. And the strange thing is that the devil scarcely tries to lie to his votaries; he does not deceive—he tempts; he knows that that will be enough. Before the silly fish in the dim waters he dangles the gilded bait; he knows the victim will rush at it and swallow it. Then he will be able, in the. picture of St. James, to drag him out to gasp and lie torn and wounded on the shore.

One of the vilest ideals is that of wealth. The greed of gold is the meanest, and its ideals are attainable by anybody. Any fool, if he chooses only to creep and crawl enough, can get rich if he likes. And riches have made millions mean, and millions dishonest, and millions God-forgetting; but what man who ever lived have they made happy? Human souls are not low enough, after all, to be made happy by accumulation, as the beetle is, though they may spend their life at it as the beetle does. He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be honest, and many a man who is making, or has made, a fortune by dishonest bargains, by grinding the faces of the poor, by cheating the ignorant and the confiding, by trades which ruin the bodies and souls of men, by false weights and deceitful balances, which are an abomination to the Lord, has sold his eternal jewel for the dross, not one atom of which he can take away with him. ‘Who is that purpureal personage who has such a splendid dress?’ asks the Latin epigrammatist. The answer is, ‘Take the plaister off his forehead, and underneath you will read the three letters F U R, Fur [thief], branded there.’ Many a respected person in society, who has made money by base means, deserves just as much to have those very letters branded on his forehead, knowing very well that they are branded indelibly on his soul.

II. When God intends to fill the soul, it has been said, He first makes it empty; when He wishes to enrich a soul He first makes it poor; when He wishes to exalt a soul He first makes it sensible of its own want and nothingness. But as for earthly successes, they are vain in two ways: vain because they are often unattainable; vain because, when attained, they are of their very nature disappointing. God disillusionises us by refusing our desire, or by granting our desire and sending leanness withal into our souls. You all want happiness; earthly things do not and cannot give it, and never have done. Satiety and sloth are poor counterfeits, but these mock the poor worldling and vex the feverish.

There is one man, and one only, of whom the ideal is perfect, attainable, satisfying, ennobling, eternal; it is the ideal of Him by whose name every one of you is called—the Man Christ Jesus; it is the ideal of holiness to which He excited us, and the example which He set, ‘that we might follow in His steps.’

Dean Farrar.

Illustrations

(1) ‘Youth is meant to be enthusiastic, and to feed its aspirations on noble ideas, and if, instead of that, it does as too many do, especially in countries where wealth abounds, namely, regards life as a garden of delights, or sometimes as a sty where young men may wallow in “pleasures,” then farewell to all hopes of high achievements, or of an honourable career. The ideals will fade fast enough; but alas for the life which had none to begin with!’

(2) ‘Put first things first. One of the most important lessons of life is to discern the relative value of the objects within our reach. The child will take the handful of glass beads, and leave the heap of diamonds in the rough. It is the terrible mistake of men that, perplexed by earth’s cross-lights, they put evil for good and good for evil; they make earth rather than heaven their centre, time rather than eternity their measurement.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/1-kings-3.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 3:5 In Gibeon the LORD appeared to Solomon in a dream by night: and God said, Ask what I shall give thee.

Ver. 5. In Gibeon the Lord appeared, &c.] Solomen worshippeth God by day: God appeareth to him by night. Well may we look to enjoy God, when we have served him. The night cannot but be happy whose day hath been holy. (a)

Ask what I shall give thee.] And saith not God as much in effect to every faithful petitioner? [Matthew 7:7 James 1:5 Isaiah 45:11]

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-3.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

1 Kings 3:5

Solomon's prayer was acceptable to God (1) because every true and faithful prayer is so acceptable, and (2) because of all prayers He loveth best those that are wholly unselfish, those in which all thoughts of self are absorbed and annihilated in thoughts of Him and of our fellow-men.

I. Even of things earthly God says to each of us, "Ask what I shall give thee." Our lives may be very much what we choose to make them. Asking God for gifts at the hands of time or opportunity does not mean mere asking; he who asks must, if his prayer is to be listened to, be sincere in his petition, and if he be sincere, will naturally and necessarily take the means which God appoints. Were it not so—if vice could with a wish yawn into being the rewards of virtue, if sluggishness could at a touch appropriate to itself the gifts of toil—then prayer would corrupt the world. Action, effort, perseverance—these are the touchstones that test the pure gold of sincerity.

II. Though this be true of earthly things, it is ten times more indisputably true of the better and the heavenly. Dost thou love uprightness? Ask it, will it, and thou shalt be upright. Dost thou love purity? Ask it, will it, and thou shalt be pure. "Ask what I shall give thee." God said it to Solomon in the dim visions of the night; He says it to us by the voice of His eternal Son. "Every one that asketh receiveth, and he that seeketh findeth, and to him that knocketh it shall be opened."

F. W. Farrar, In the Days of thy Youth, p. 159.


I. Not wealth, not pleasure, not fame, not victory, not length of days, but an understanding heart, was the choice of Solomon's boyhood.

The prayer for wisdom is always pleasing to God. (1) Even intellectual wisdom—how far higher is it, how far worthier of man as God made him, than any alternative of fashion or vanity of wit or vice. Fear not to ask of God an understanding heart, even in studies which name not His name. (2) But the speech which pleased the Lord was a prayer rather for practical wisdom. The gift which Solomon's prayer drew down was the gift of justice. When he seated himself in the gate to hear the causes which Israel brought to him, intellect was nothing; judgment, the power to discriminate between good and bad—this was his work. This therefore was his prayer.

II. The bitter and painful thing to remember in the history before us is the wreck and ruin of that prayer which in itself was so beautiful and so acceptable. (1) It may have been that Solomon's largeness of heart slipped into latitudinarianism. (2) That which cankered Solomon's wisdom was the entrance of sinful lust.

III. We may hope that even out of this wreck the lost life found a way to arise. We read the Book of Ecclesiastes as the record of that hope. Let us hope that the night's prayer at Gibeon was being answered, though in dim and broken reflection, in the latest utterances of the Preacher, son of David, king of Jerusalem.

C. J. Vaughan, Sermon Preached at St. Olave's School, 1872.

References: 1 Kings 3:5.—Clergyman's Magazine, vol. xiii., p. 19; J. Vaughan, Children's Sermons, 5th series, p. 37; Bishop Thorold, Good Words, 1878, p. 20. 1 Kings 3:7.—Outline Sermons for Children, p. 45

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/1-kings-3.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Kings 3:5. The Lord appeared to Solomon in a dream Sleep is like a state of death to the soul; wherein the senses are locked up, and the understanding and will deprived of the free exercise of their functions. And yet this is no impediment to God in communicating his will to mankind: for, no doubt, he has power not only to awaken our intellectual faculties, but to advance them above their ordinary measure of perception, even while the body is asleep. See Job 33:14. In a word, we cannot but allow, that God can approach the soul in many different ways, when the body is in a state of rest and inactivity; can move and actuate it just as he pleases; and when he is inclined to make a discovery of any thing, can set such a lively representation of it before the understanding, as shall prevent a man's doubting the reality of the vision. See Calmet.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-kings-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Quest. How could Solomon pray in his dream, or that prayer be acceptable to God, as this was, 1 Kings 3:10?

Answ. The dreams of men are not such insignificant things as many imagine. That good dreams are oftentimes praiseworthy, and evil dreams blameworthy, is not only the opinion of the Jews and Christians, but of divers of the wiser and better heathens; and the reason hereof is evident, because men’s dreams are commonly the images of their minds and tempers, and do only reflect and represent, though but faintly and imperfectly, those very things which are most imprinted upon their hearts by their waking meditations and daily conversation; and therefore it is not unreasonable, that either the sinful dreams of evil-minded men should be imputed to them, and punished in them, or the virtuous dreams of good men be imputed to and rewarded in them: which was Solomon’s case; for his heart having been daily and constantly employed in passionate longings and prayers for the wisdom which here he begs, it was a natural and likely thing that his heart should, as it did, work that way even in his dreams. Although, to speak truly and strictly, Solomon’s prayer made in his dream would have been no way pleasing to God, nor profitable to himself, if it had not been the result of his daily and most serious practice; and though God signified his mind in a dream, yet it was Solomon’s waking prayers (which were shadowed by this dark representation) which God accepted and requited; and this acceptance of God was signified to him in an extraordinary manner, and by a Divine dream, which was one of those ways whereby God oft used to communicate his will to his prophets and people. So the whole business lies thus: Solomon dreamed that God bid him ask what he would, 1 Kings 3:5, and that he did ask wisdom, 1 Kings 3:6, &c., and that God accepted his desire, 1 Kings 3:10, and gave him that gracious answer, 1 Kings 3:11. &c. And all this was done in a dream, but with this difference; Solomon’s prayer was but imaginary, but God’s answer was real, though conveyed in a dream. And when he awoke, he knew by Divine inspiration that this was a dream sent from God to assure him that he would give him wisdom, and riches, and honour, and this with respect unto his frequent, constant, and fervent waking desires, which his dream of his prayers did sufficiently intimate. See Poole "1 Kings 3:6".

God said, i.e. he dreamed that God said so.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5.In a dream by night — This was one mode of Divine revelation. See marginal reference. In such cases the soul was raised to a state of Divine ecstacy and illumination, and held conscious intercourse with God or angels; but when the natural, waking consciousness returned, the person knew it was a dream. See 1 Kings 3:15.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-3.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Kings 3:5. The Lord appeared to Solomon in a dream — As he had done to Jacob at Bethel, Genesis 28:13; and to others on different occasions, Genesis 20:3; Genesis 26:24. Sleep is like a state of death to the soul; wherein the senses are locked up, and the understanding and will deprived of the free exercise of their functions. And yet this is no impediment to God in communicating his will to mankind; for no doubt he has power, not only to awaken our intellectual faculties, but to advance them above their ordinary measure of perception, even while the body is asleep. Solomon had prayed the day before with great fervency, and desired of God the gift of wisdom: see Wisdom of Solomon 7:7. In the night-time God appeared unto him in a dream, and bade him ask whatever he would. Solomon, having his mind still full of the desire of wisdom, asked and obtained it: so that the prayer or desire he uttered in his dream was but the consequence of the option he had made the day before, when he was awake. In a word, though we should allow that the soul of man, when the body is asleep, is in a state of rest and inactivity; yet we cannot but think that God can approach it many different ways; can move and actuate it just as he pleases; and, when he is inclined to make a discovery of any thing, can set such a lively representation of it before the understanding, as shall make a man not doubt of the reality of the vision. See Calmet and Dodd.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-kings-3.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

In a prophetic dream, or ecstasy. His mind had been so filled with the desire of wisdom, that the same thoughts recurred to him while he slept; and, as he had entertained them voluntarily before, he acquired fresh merit even during that time; as a man, who indulges sensual affections, becomes responsible for the accidents of the night. (St. Thomas Aquinas, [Summa Theologiae] 1. 2. q. 113. a. 2. and 2. 2. 9. 154. a. 5.) (St. Augustine, de Gen. ad lit. xii. 15.) (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

dream. One of the twenty in Scripture. See note on Genesis 20:3. God. Hebrew. Elohim. App-4.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

In Gibeon the LORD appeared to Solomon in a dream by night: and God said, Ask what I shall give thee.

In Gibeon the Lord appeared to Solomon in a dream. It was probably at the close of this season, when his mind had been elevated into a high state of religious fervour by the protracted services. Solomon felt an intense desire, and he had offered an earnest petition, for the gift of wisdom. In sleep his thoughts ran upon the subject of his prayer, and he dreamed that God appeared to him, and gave him the option of everything in the world, that he asked wisdom, and that God granted his request. His dream was but imaginary repetition of his former desire; but God's grant of it was real.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-kings-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) The Lord appeared.—This direct communication to Solomon by a dream—standing in contrast with the indirect knowledge of the Lord’s will by David through the prophets Nathan and Gad (2 Samuel 7:2-17; 2 Samuel 12:1-14; 2 Samuel 24:11-14), and by “enquiring of the Lord” through the priest (1 Samuel 23:9-12; 1 Samuel 30:7; 2 Samuel 2:1)—is perhaps the first indication of some temporary abeyance of the prophetic office, and (as appears still more clearly from the history of the consecration of the Temple), of a loss of leadership in the priesthood. At the same time it is to be noted that the vision of the Lord through dreams, being of a lower type than the waking vision, is mostly recorded as given to those outside the Covenant, as Abimelech (Genesis 20:3-7), Laban (Genesis 31:24), Pharaoh and his servants (Genesis 40:5; Genesis 41:1-8), the Midianite (Judges 7:13), and Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 2:1; Daniel 4:10-18); as belonging to the early stages of revelation, to Abraham (Genesis 15:12), Jacob (Genesis 28:12-15), and Joseph (Genesis 37:5-10); and as marking the time of cessation of the regular succession of the prophets during the Captivity (Daniel 2:19; Daniel 7:1).

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-kings-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

In Gibeon the LORD appeared to Solomon in a dream by night: and God said, Ask what I shall give thee.
the Lord
9:2
in a dream
Genesis 28:12,13; Numbers 12:6; Job 33:14,15; Matthew 1:20; 2:13,19
Ask what
2 Chronicles 1:7-12; Matthew 7:7,8; Mark 10:36,38-51; 11:24; John 14:13,14; 15:16; James 1:5,6; 1 John 5:14,15
Reciprocal: Genesis 31:10 - a dream;  Genesis 31:24 - dream;  Genesis 37:5 - dreamed;  Joshua 10:41 - Gibeon;  Joshua 18:25 - Gibeon;  1 Kings 11:9 - which had appeared;  1 Chronicles 14:4 - Solomon;  Nehemiah 2:4 - For what;  Esther 5:3 - What;  Psalm 72:2 - He shall;  Proverbs 4:8 - GeneralProverbs 30:7 - have;  Zechariah 1:8 - by night;  Matthew 20:21 - What;  Luke 18:41 - What;  1 Corinthians 12:8 - is given

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-3.html.