Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Samuel 18:30

Then the commanders of the Philistines went out to battle, and it happened as often as they went out, that David behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul. So his name was highly esteemed.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jealousy;   Philistines;   Prudence;   Thompson Chain Reference - Good;   Name;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Philistia, philistines;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Prayer;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - David;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Lords of the Philistines;   Prince;   Set;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Philis'tines;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Lords of the Philistines;   Samuel, Books of;   Set;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Then the princes of the Philistines went forth - Probably to avenge themselves on David and the Israelites: but of this war we know no more than that David was more skillful and successful in it than any of the other officers of Saul. His military skill was greater, and his success was proportionate to his skill and courage; hence it is said, he behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-samuel-18.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

ANOTHER SUMMARY COVERING A PERIOD OF TIME

"Then the princes of the Philistines came out to battle, and as often as they came out David had more success than all the servants of Saul; so his name was highly esteemed."

"The princes of the Philistines." There is a great deal of ambiguity in much of what is found in certain passages; and, in this instance, it is not clear whether the Philistine princes were leaders of armies into battle, or if they came out, after the manner of Goliath, seeking single combat. The New English Bible understands it to mean that, "they came out seeking single combat." Willis designated this understanding of the passage as "plausible,"[10] but to this writer it appears far more likely that they came as leaders of military detachments.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/1-samuel-18.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then the princes of the Philistines went forth,.... Out of their cities in troops, to revenge and spoil the land of Israel, being enraged at their defeat when Goliath their champion was slain, and at the injury and dishonour done them by David very lately in slaying two hundred of them, and taking off their foreskins; and, as the Jews sayF2Midrash Schemuel apud Abarbinel. in loc. , having heard of the marriage of David, and understanding the Israelites had a law, that a newly married man might not go to the war the first year, took this opportunity of invading and spoiling them; whereas David understood that law better than they, and knew it referred not to a voluntary war, but to that which was the command of God against the seven nations; and even in that case, as some think, it did not oblige such persons to remain at home, but left it to their choice to do as they pleased:

and it came to pass after they went forth; and were met and opposed by the Israelites, by the troops of Saul, under different commanders:

that David behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul; showed himself to be more expert in the art of war, and formed designs with great wisdom and prudence, and which he as wisely executed, as well as with great courage and valour, to the annoyance and defeat of the enemy, and to the advantage, defence, and safety of the people of Israel; or he was more "prosperous" than they, as the Targum, and so others interpret it; he was more successful in his attacks on the Philistines, and in his skirmishes with them:

so that his name was much set by; he was in high esteem with the people; his name was "precious"F3וייקר "et in pretio esset vel erat", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator. to them, as the word signifies; they made mention of it, as, Ben Gersom interprets it, with great honour and glory; so that Saul failed much, and was greatly disappointed in the scheme he had formed against him,

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-samuel-18.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Then the princes of the Philistines went forth: and it came to pass, after they went forth, [that] o David behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul; so that his name was much set by.

(o) That is, David had better success against the Philistines than Saul's men.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/1-samuel-18.html. 1599-1645.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

I would call upon the Reader, while calling upon my own soul, in the contemplation of this chapter, to pass by all other considerations, to pause over the view of the love of Jonathan to David; to remark its wonderful properties, to stand amazed at the extensiveness of creature love in this man; and then to ask my heart, whether there is not cause to blush in the view of it, when I compare his love to David to my love to Him, who is David's Lord? Was Jonathan's soul so instantly captivated, so strongly rivetted, and so engaged by covenant to David, as to love him as his own soul; to strip himself of his garments and of his princely robe, in order to cloath David; while I who have so long known the Lord Jesus; have been so often fed, so constantly cloathed, so ever lastingly protected, so graciously loved by him, feel such coldness, such deadness, and such little drawings of my heart towards him!

Oh! precious Jesus! thy love indeed is better than wine, thy favour than life itself. Thou hast shown it by ways infinitely surpassing the love of Jonathan to David. Thou hast not only cloathed the souls of thy people, with thy robe and garment of salvation, but thou hast made over thine whole soul to their welfare. All the blessings of grace flow from thy boundless, matchless love. And the various ways by which thou hast made the rich discoveries of thy love, all show its wonderful properties. The covenant thou didst make for them in the everlasting counsel of peace, makes known thy love, for thou art thyself the whole of the Covenant. Yes! clearest Lord! thou hast proved it by all thy suretyship engagements; by all thy gracious undertakings; by all thy great accomplishments; by all thou hast done, and art doing, and wilt do for thy people. Oh! dearest, blessed Jesus! add this one mercy to all thou hast wrought, as great a miracle as any; melt my cold icy heart into a love for thee, who hast so loved me, and knit my whole soul unto thee, that I may fear and love thy name. Then will my song correspond with that of David, and I shall say as he did; I will love thee, O Lord my strength. The Lord is my rock, and my fortress, and my Deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust; my buckler, the horn also of my salvation, and my high tower.

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Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/1-samuel-18.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then the princes of the Philistines went forth: and it came to pass, after they went forth, that David behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul; so that his name was much set by.

Went forth — To war against the Israelites, being provoked by their former losses, and especially by that act of David's.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-samuel-18.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Samuel 18:30 Then the princes of the Philistines went forth: and it came to pass, after they went forth, [that] David behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul; so that his name was much set by.

Ver. 30. So that his name was much set by.] Heb., Was precious. Glory fled from Saul who followed it; but followed David who fled from it.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-samuel-18.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Went forth, to wit, to war against the Israelites, being provoked both by their former losses, and especially by that act of David’s, related above, 1 Samuel 18:27.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-samuel-18.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

30.The Philistines went forth — To battle against the armies of Israel.

David behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul — Showed more prudence, skill, and prowess in all the tactics of war.

Much set by — Exceedingly honoured.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-samuel-18.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Samuel 18:30. The princes of the Philistines went forth — To fight with the Israelites: who had highly incensed them by David’s late action, as well as by former losses. David behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul, &c. — By discovering, it is likely, the designs of the Philistines, and preventing them. For we do not read that they came to a battle.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-samuel-18.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Forth, probably to revenge the recent insult. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-samuel-18.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

after = whenever; or, as often as.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-samuel-18.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(30) Went forth.—Probably to avenge the last raid of David (recounted in 1 Samuel 18:27). Wordsworth, quoting from the Rabbis, suggests that they were emboldened to make this attack, supposing that their successful foe would, according to the Hebrew Law, claim exemption from warfare for a year after marriage (Deuteronomy 24:5).

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-samuel-18.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then the princes of the Philistines went forth: and it came to pass, after they went forth, that David behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul; so that his name was much set by.
the princes
Of this war we know no more than that David, whose military skill was greater, was more successful in it, than all the other officers of Saul.
went forth
2 Samuel 11:1
behaved himself
5; Psalms 119:99; Daniel 1:20; Luke 21:15; Ephesians 5:15
set by
Heb. precious.
2:30; 26:21; 2 Kings 1:13; Psalms 116:15; 1 Peter 2:4,7 Reciprocal: 1 Kings 2:3 - prosper;  Psalm 119:98 - through;  Proverbs 12:8 - commended;  Proverbs 27:21 - so;  Ecclesiastes 4:4 - every;  Hebrews 11:32 - David

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 18:30". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-samuel-18.html.